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Rosacea Is Linked To The Liver And Type 2 Diabetes And Can Be Reversed Naturally

Rosacea Is Linked to the Liver And Type 2 Diabetes And Can Be Reversed Naturally

Rosacea Is Linked to the Liver And Type 2 Diabetes And Can Be Reversed Naturally


Rosacea Is Linked to the Liver And Type 2 Diabetes And Can Be Reversed Naturally
Studies have shown that the liver is responsible for many conditions such as type 2 diabetes and are also the cause of skin conditions such as rosacea, psoriasis and more. The good news is these conditions can be reversed with these natural treatments.
Whether you know it or not, you wear your diet on your face. We all do. What you eat is generally reflected on your skin. Its reflected in how dry your skin is, how red your skin is and how oily your skin is. You can buy creams, oils and other topical treatments, but the skin is always an inside job, dictated your liver.
Causes of rosacea have been a mystery until recently. Rosacea is caused by the liver. Therefore, its no wonder that science has linked rosacea with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which are also liver conditions. Rosacea is a type of eczema (there are many varieties) that are caused by a liver overloaded with toxins. Symptoms of rosacea may include:
Facial redness. Persistent redness on the nose, cheeks and chin. The small blood vessels on your nose and cheeks can swell when you eat certain foods like chocolate, wine, tomato sauce, and dairy products.
Swollen red bumps. Many people who have rosacea also develop pimples on their face that can look like acne. These bumps sometimes contain pus. Your skin may also feel hot and tender.
Eye problems. About half of the people who have rosacea also experience eye dryness, irritation and swollen, reddened eyelids. Rarely, rosacea's eye symptoms precede the skin symptoms.
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American Diabetes Association® Announces $9.75 million to Six Leading Researchers for the 2017 Pathway to Stop Diabetes® Research Grants

American Diabetes Association® Announces $9.75 million to Six Leading Researchers for the 2017 Pathway to Stop Diabetes® Research Grants

ARLINGTON, Va., Feb. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Today, the American Diabetes Association (Association) announced $9.75 million to six recipients of the 2017 Pathway to Stop Diabetes (Pathway) research grants, providing $1.625 million to each scientist over a five- to seven-year grant term to spur breakthroughs in clinical science, technology, diabetes care and potential cures. Pathway grants are awarded in three categories: 1) Pathway Initiator, for postdoctoral fellows who are transitioning from training to research; 2) Pathway Accelerator, for diabetes researchers early in their independent careers; and 3) Pathway Visionary, for scientists established in another field who are interested in applying their expertise to diabetes research for the first time.
"Pathway to Stop Diabetes is a unique program in the fight against diabetes. The Pathway program provides exceptional researchers with multiyear grants that allow them to follow the science where it leads them," said C. Ronald Kahn, MD, chair of the Association's Mentor Advisory Group, which advises the Association on Pathway, senior investigator and past president of the Joslin Diabetes Center, and the Mary K. Iacocca Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. "We are excited to build upon the already remarkable portfolio of individuals and research from our previous Pathway awardees. The substantial level of research support and flexibility enabled by Pathway provide opportunities to locate the hidden clues that can lead to innovative advancements that could improve outcomes for millions of people with dia Continue reading

Genteel Gentle Lancing Device for Diabetes Offers Painless Blood Glucose Testing + Discount Offer

Genteel Gentle Lancing Device for Diabetes Offers Painless Blood Glucose Testing + Discount Offer


This is Diabetes Awareness Month and as Ive mentioned, its been tough since my oldest son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. My job as a parent is to make things as smooth as possible and when I heard about Genteels Gentle Lancing Device , which is billed as a no-pain way to draw blood with vacuum and depth control, I was intrigued. Would it really work? Multiple finger pricks and taking insulin 4x a day hasnt been fun for my son. Even though we recently got a Dexcom Monitor, I was shocked at how many times a day we still need to draw blood. Plus, if his Dexcom Monitor tells us hes really low or really high, I have to double check with a blood draw, besides calibrating the Dexcom 2x a day). With Genteel, could we make that painless? For the answer, read on.G
enteel Gentle Lancing Device Review for Kids and Adults with Diabetes
This is the description on how the Genteel Gentle Lancing Device works: With its patented Butterfly Touch Technology, the Genteel Lancing Device gets test blood from anywhere on the body without pain. Using vacuum, vibration, and depth control, the perfect drop of blood can be drawn, even from the shallowest test site. The lancet only reaches blood capillaries and avoids hitting pain nerves altogether.
Finger pricking has been painful with the lancing device that came with our monitor. Plus I had to constantly had to squeeze his poor fingers to draw blood. Sometimes there wasnt enough blood to go on the test strip, so I would have to prick his finger again. Frankly, it was almost worse than taking the insulin injections and my sons poor fingers Continue reading

How to Follow a Vegan Diet With Diabetes

How to Follow a Vegan Diet With Diabetes

The same day now-58-year-old Nara Schuler was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2010, her doctor told her she’d have to start medication immediately — and stay on it for the rest of her life. But Schuler refused to accept this treatment recommendation. “I have to at least try to do something for myself,” she recalls thinking.
With some research, Schuler learned about the potential benefits of a vegan diet for people with type 2 diabetes, and she began cutting meat and dairy, as well as packaged, processed, and fast food from her diet.
Her new eating plan consisted mainly of nonstarchy vegetables, plus some fruit, beans, nuts, and seeds. And, to her delight, her diabetes improved.
Within three months, her A1C, a measure of average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months, returned to normal. “I could see that the blood sugar was lowering every single day,” Schuler says. Within seven months, she had shed 90 pounds, helping to increase her insulin sensitivity.
“I felt so empowered — it was amazing,” Schuler says. “It gave me a feeling of accomplishment that’s indescribable.”
The Pros of a Vegan Diet for Diabetes
“There’s a lot of new evidence showing up telling us the benefits of following a plant-based diet,” says Marina Chaparro, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics who has type 1 diabetes.
A review published in June 2016 in the journal PLoS Medicine suggested that following a plant-based diet rich in high-quality plant foods may decrease the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And a vegan diet may also Continue reading

My Way-Too-Sweet Sixteen: A Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Story

My Way-Too-Sweet Sixteen: A Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Story


My Way-Too-Sweet Sixteen: A Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Story
My Way-Too-Sweet Sixteen: A Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Story
The theory in my family is that my pancreas had been dying a slow death for fifteen years. A cows milk-related allergy (so the family lore unfurled) had spelled doom for this most delicate of organs before I could even walk. But lets give credit where credits due: my pancreas took its time destroying itself, waiting until my sixteenth birthday before giving up the ghost.
While the research is far from conclusive, some past studies havesuggested that beta-lactoglobulin, a protein found in cows milk, may contribute to later development of Type 1 diabetes. As a baby, I broke out in severe red rashes when given cows milk. Concerned, my rural-Wisconsin-dwelling parents bought goats named Friday and Crusoe and fed me their milk instead. This might have helped, who knowsmaybe the damage was already done. Or perhaps this family legend has nothing to do with my disease. The reality is that tracing the factors behind ones development of Type 1 diabetes remains elusive, and may be linked to a number of factors, whether environmental, genetic, or virus-related.
Whatever the explanation for my development of Type 1 at the age of sixteen might be, the stark truth is that the months leading up to my diagnosis were near impossible. Not that I noticed.
Developing Type 1 is a funny thingits encroachment is so subtle, so nefarious, that you barely recognize that anything has changed. I likely went undiagnosed for months, and my symptoms were simply absorbed into a new Continue reading

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