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Risk Of Diabetes Type 1 'can Be Tripled By Childhood Stress'

Risk of diabetes type 1 'can be tripled by childhood stress'

Risk of diabetes type 1 'can be tripled by childhood stress'

Stressful life events in childhood such as family break-up, death or illness, can triple the risk of developing type 1 diabetes, research suggests. In a study, researchers found that children who experienced an event associated with “major stress” were almost three times more likely to develop the condition than those who had not.
The Swedish study analysed more than 10,000 families with children aged between two and 14, who did not already have the condition. The aim was to pinpoint any family conflicts, unemployment problems, alteration of family structure, or intervention from social services. Subsequently, 58 children were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.
The causes of type 1 diabetes are unknown but it is usually preceded by the immune system attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin.
Based on the results, the researchers, from Linkoping University, said they thought the stressful events could contribute to beta cell stress due to increased insulin resistance as well as increased insulin demand due to the physiological stress response, such as elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol.
In the paper, published on Thursday in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), the authors write: “Consistent with several previous retrospective studies, this first prospective study concludes that the experience of a serious life event (reasonably indicating psychological stress) during the first 14 years of life may be a risk factor for developing type 1 diabetes.
“The current study examined serious li Continue reading

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Anxiety and Depression May Increase Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

Anxiety and Depression May Increase Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms of anxiety found to be independent of symptoms of depression
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) which affects >9% of the population, and depression, which affects >5% of the population, are the leading global causes of morbidity and mortality. Patients with T2D experience depression five-times higher than the general population. Due to the symptomatic similarities between anxiety and depression, they are often documented together. Mortality studies have shown a consistent association between depression and excess mortality, but the evidence relating anxiety and mortality risk remains inconsistent. Recent studies reflect a higher relative risk of mortality associated with depression than anxiety in the general population.
Studies have demonstrated that the mortality risk associated with depression varies according to the severity of disorder and sex. On one hand, major depression increases mortality risk in both men and women, but minor depression increases risk only in men. On the other hand, a study showed excess mortality with anxiety associated in men than women. However, studies rarely consider the presence of anxiety or depression as comorbid, thus the ability to attribute risk to either disorder is obscured. Due to greater risk of noncompliance, depression is a concern in T2D patients who self-manage their treatment. The purpose of the study was to examine the mortality risk associated with T2D and comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety between men and women in a large general population to determine whether they are differentially affected. The primary outcome of in Continue reading

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar and Is It Good for Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar and Is It Good for Diabetes?

In the past, coffee was believed to be bad for the overall health. But nowadays, there is growing evidence that the coffee might actually be beneficial and help protect from Parkinson’s disease, certain types of cancer, depression and liver disease.
One study came to the conclusion that if you increase the intake of coffee that might be beneficial, which was contrary to the previous belief.
In fact, increased intake of coffee can reduce the risk of the developing type 2 diabetes. This is great news for people who cannot go through the day or simply start the day without a cup of coffee.
However, people who have type 2 diabetes should be careful. Why? Because in this case, the coffee could have negative effects.
It does not matter if you have diabetes, or you cannot start your day without coffee, or maybe you are trying to reduce the risk of diabetes, you need to know about the effects coffee has when it comes to diabetes.
What Is Diabetes?
Diabetes is actually a disease i.e. group of disease that actually has an effect on the way your body processes the sugar i.e. blood glucose.
The blood glucose is crucial because it is the one that provides your tissues and muscles with energy and it fuels the brain.
In the case of diabetes, there is too much circulation of blood glucose in the body which can lead to some health concerns.
There are different factors that play a role when it comes to developing diabetes. The chronic types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2.
But, there are also other types such as gestational diabetes, which happens in time of pregnancy, but after birth, i Continue reading

Beyond Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

Beyond Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

You’ve probably heard of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. But did you know there are several other types as well? As we get into Diabetes Awareness Month, it’s a great time to learn about the various forms of this extraordinarily common disease—and how they might affect you and your loved ones.
What we refer to today as “diabetes” was originally named “diabetes mellitus”— a marriage of the greek verb diabeinein which means “to go through,” and the Latin noun mellitus, meaning “sweet.” Recently, we’ve gained a better understanding of how diabetes develops, which has caused a series of re-classifications. Here, we’ll provide an overview of some of these classifications and their defining characteristics.
Ultimately, diabetes is a disease in which sugar regulation goes awry. Every cell in our body uses sugar as an energy source; however, too much or too little sugar can be problematic. Our bodies control the amount of sugar in the blood via a series of different proteins. One of these proteins is a hormone known as insulin, which is made in the pancreas and circulates throughout the body. This hormone helps cells remove sugar from the bloodstream. Diabetes develops when this regulatory system is disrupted; the factors leading to this disruption are what differentiates the various forms of diabetes.
Type 1 diabetes (T1D)
About 5-10% of people with diabetes have what is referred to as Type 1 diabetes (T1D). This form of the disease was once known as “juvenile diabetes” because it was typically diagnosed if a person showed symptoms of diabetes during ch Continue reading

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Black Tea Improves Glucose Levels, May Help Prevent Diabetes

Although green tea has been getting most of the attention lately for its myriad health benefits, accumulating research shows that black tea offers advantages, too. The latest revelation: black tea’s ability to blunt increases in blood sugar. 1
A new study has found that black tea significantly reduces rises in blood glucose levels among both healthy and pre-diabetic adults, in this case after consuming a sugary drink. 1
“We demonstrated that black tea reduced incremental blood glucose after sucrose consumption at 60, 90 and 120 minutes compared with placebo,” wrote the authors of the study, which appears in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1
“The data confirm that polyphenols lower glycemic response and may be responsible for the lower rates of diabetes observed with tea and coffee consumption,” said Peter Clifton, M.D., PhD., professor of nutrition at the University of South Australia in Adelaide, who recently conducted a review of the role of dietary polyphenols (in tea, cinnamon, coffee, chocolate, pomegranate, red wine and olive oil, among others) in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, published in Nutrients. 2, 3
The Polyphenol Power of Tea
Indeed, the major bioactive compounds in black tea are polyphenols—naturally occurring antioxidants abundant in plant foods (and drinks) that are said to promote health and protect against a range of diseases. 4
Black, green and oolong teas are all made from the plant Camellia Sinensis. Green tea, which is minimally oxidized, contains simple flavonoids called catechins. During the proce Continue reading

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