diabetestalk.net

“Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts With Ignoring The Guidelines”

“Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts with Ignoring the Guidelines”

“Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts with Ignoring the Guidelines”

Here’s a great new TEDx-talk on how to reverse type 2 diabetes using LCHF diets. It was released a couple of days ago.
The presenter is Dr. Sarah Hallberg, the medical director and founder of the Indiana University – Arnett Health Medical Weight Loss Program. I didn’t know about her before, but suspect this is not the last we hear from her.
This talk starts out good, but it turns great as it goes on. Anybody with type 2 diabetes – or who treats type 2 diabetes – would benefit from seeing it.
The presentation been viewed over 12,000 times in just a few days. Hopefully it will be seen by ten times as many soon, end up on the main TED site – and be seen by millions.
More Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Can You Eat Eggs if You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs if You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat?
Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein.
The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar.
Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable.
Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks.
A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health.
Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes.
Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calori Continue reading

Four eggs a week 'can reduce risk of diabetes'

Four eggs a week 'can reduce risk of diabetes'

Eating four eggs a week can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than a third, according to a new study.
Scientists found that egg consumption was associated with a lower risk of the disease as well as with lower blood sugar levels.
The research, led by University of Eastern Finland, examined the eating habits of 2,332 men aged between 42 and 60.
It found that those who ate four eggs per week had a 37 per cent lower risk than men who only ate one egg per week.
The association persisted even when factors such as physical activity, body mass index, smoking and consumption of fruits and vegetables were taken into account.
The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, said that eggs contained many nutrients that could effect glucose metabolism and low-grade inflammation.
However, consumption of more than four eggs did not bring any significant additional benefits.
And researchers warned that those who already have type 2 diabetes should not increase their egg intake, as they appeared to increase heart disease in those who had already been diagnosed with the condition.
The scientists studied the eating and lifestyle habits of those who took part in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study between 1984 and 1989.
Two decades later, 432 men had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
Separate research has found that eating full-fat dairy products also slashed the risk of type 2 diabetes.
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden found that those who ate high fat dairy products had a 23 per cent lower risk of developing the disease.
But high fat m Continue reading

Eat EGGS to beat diabetes: Four a week can slash risk by 40 per cent

Eat EGGS to beat diabetes: Four a week can slash risk by 40 per cent

Researchers were stunned to learn that, although naturally high in cholesterol, eggs can cut the danger of developing Type 2 diabetes by almost 40 per cent.
The findings suggest eggs could play a crucial role in halting an epidemic of the condition which is sweeping Britain.
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland said they think the results may be due to nutrients in eggs that improve the way the body metabolises sugar and help to dampen down inflammation which leads to chronic illness.
Previous studies had shown eggs raise cholesterol levels in patients who already have diabetes, but there had been little research on whether they made it likelier for people to develop the condition in the first place.
The specific suggestion of a protective effect against diabetes is interesting and needs further study to explain why this might be the case
The Finnish scientists analysed the eating habits of 2,332 middle-aged men who signed up to a study in the l980s.
Over the next 20 years, 432 of the men developed Type 2 diabetes.
The scientists found that men who ate roughly four eggs a week were 38 per cent less likely to fall ill than those who rarely or never ate eggs. They had lower blood sugar levels without seeing a steep rise in cholesterol.
The researchers said that eating more than four eggs a week did not seem to increase protection and stressed that they did not look at how the eggs were cooked.
Boiling, scrambling and poaching are regarded as the healthiest options while frying eggs can increase cholesterol intake by 50 per cent.
Professor Jyrki Virtanen said: “Eg Continue reading

A hockey camp for kids suffering from diabetes

A hockey camp for kids suffering from diabetes

MONTREAL - The Montreal Canadiens and Sun Life Financial Inc. are proud to team up and provide children living with type 1 diabetes the opportunity to attend hockey camp. This unique initiative, which is part of the Montreal Canadiens Hockey School program presented by Le Dindon du Québec, will provide children impacted by this disease the opportunity to learn the game of hockey and how to best manage their disease on and off the ice.
According to the Canadian Paediatric Society, approximately 33,000 children between the ages of 5 and 18 are living with type 1 diabetes*. The camp, run in collaboration with Dskate, is specially designed to teach the children and their families about diabetes and bring sports and health professionals together under one roof.
"We are very grateful for Sun Life Financial's support, because without them, this special edition hockey camp would not have been possible", said Geneviève Paquette, Executive Director, Community Relations, Montreal Canadiens. "We want to encourage children from all walks of life to learn the game of hockey and develop their physical skills. Thanks to the expertise provided by Dskate and the collaboration with Sun Life Financial, we are able to provide children living with type 1 diabetes the tools and skills they need to best manage their disease."
"Since we announced our support of diabetes in 2012, we've focused on diabetes awareness, prevention, care and research, with over $17 million committed to date," said Robert Dumas, President, Sun Life Financial, Quebec. "We're proud to continue our long-standing partnershi Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles