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Researchers Identify Gene Variants Linked To Both Type 2 Diabetes And CHD Risk

Researchers identify gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and CHD risk

Researchers identify gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and CHD risk

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a global epidemic affecting more than 380 million people worldwide; yet there are knowledge gaps in understanding the etiology of type-2 diabetes. T2D is also a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), but the biological pathways that explain the connection have remained somewhat murky. Now, in a large analysis of genetic data, published on August 28, 2017 in Nature Genetics, a team, led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has first looked into what causes T2D and second clarified how T2D and CHD – the two diseases that are the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, are linked.
Examining genome sequence information for more than 250,000 people, the researchers first uncovered 16 new diabetes genetic risk factors, and one new CHD genetic risk factor; hence providing novel insights about the mechanisms of the two diseases. They then showed that most of the sites on the genome known to be associated with higher diabetes risk are also associated with higher CHD risk. For eight of these sites, the researchers were able to identify a specific gene variant that influences risk for both diseases. The shared genetic risk factors affect biological pathways including immunity, cell proliferation, and heart development.
The findings add to the basic scientific understanding of both these major diseases and point to potential targets for future drugs.
"Identifying these gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and CHD risk in principle opens up opportunities to lower the ri Continue reading

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4 Must-Do Gym Exercises to Help Prevent Diabetes

4 Must-Do Gym Exercises to Help Prevent Diabetes

Are you at risk for diabetes? Diabetes is reaching an all-time high. In fact, over 29 million people have diabetes. What’s even more concerning (despite that shocking number) is that 86 million people have prediabetes, meaning they have higher than normal blood sugars and are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years if they don’t make changes. The majority of Type 2 diabetes is related to excess weight, so what you eat plays a critical role. But exercise also plays an important part in burning off excess weight and improving our overall health.
So if you’ve been told you have prediabetes, besides changing the way you eat, you likely need to change the way you exercise. All those changes can be confusing, so here are four gym exercises you should consider doing:
1. Skip the treadmill and hop on the elliptical.
I am a big supporter of walking — walking up/down stairs, walking from the parking lot to entrances, walking during the morning or evening. I even have worn a pedometer for many months. But for many people at risk for diabetes, walking may not be enough. So the inevitable question: Should I use the treadmill, elliptical or exercise bikes? They all have pros/cons, and it’s mostly pros. For instance, exercise bikes are low impact and fairly safe. Basically anyone can jump on, and start using it. But overall, stationary bikes don’t burn that many calories and it mostly works lower body muscles. The treadmill — whether walking or running — involves a wider variety of muscles, including core muscles in the back and abs to stabilize your body. Trea Continue reading

Keto Diet better than high carb for Type 2 diabetes

Keto Diet better than high carb for Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a common condition characterized by high levels of blood sugar, usually due to insulin resistance.
The treatment of type 2 diabetes involves medication, but lifestyle strategies are very important as well.
These include increased exercise, weight loss and diet management.
Although low-carb diets have become popular for managing type 2 diabetes, few high-quality studies have investigated their long-term effects on blood sugar control and risk factors for heart disease.
ARTICLE REVIEWED
A team of Australian researchers set out to compare the long-term health effects of a low-carb diet and a high-carb diet, focusing on differences in blood sugar control and risk factors for heart disease.
Tay et al. Comparison of Low- and High-Carbohydrate Diets for Type 2 Diabetes Management: A Randomized Trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2015.
STUDY DESIGN
This was a randomized trial that spanned one year, or 52 weeks total.
A total of 115 obese and overweight adults with type 2 diabetes participated. Their age ranged from 35 to 68 years.
The participants were randomly assigned to one of two diets that contained an equal amount of calories:
Low-carb diet (LC): Carbs, protein and fat comprised 14%, 28% and 58% of calories, respectively. The total carb content was under 50 grams per day.
High-carb diet (HC): Carbs, protein and fat comprised 53%, 17% and 30% of calories, respectively.
Both diets restricted calories in order to produce weight loss. Calories were restricted by 30%, which amounted to 500–1000 calories, depending on the individual.
The fat content o Continue reading

Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: How I Was Misdiagnosed With Type 2

Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: How I Was Misdiagnosed With Type 2

Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: How I Was Misdiagnosed With Type 2
Jenna Steinhauer
My name is Jenna and I live in beautiful Southern California with my two kitties. I’m the very proud auntie of a spunky 5-year-old niece and wild almost 3-year-old nephew. I don’t have any children of my own yet, so, I am obsessed with spoiling and loving these two little humans that mean so much to me.
I have two sisters; one older, who is the mother of those sweet kids I told you about, and a twin sister, who has Cerebral Palsy and lives with my parents. I’m in love with all things makeup and fashion and I have a slight addiction to iced coffee; only iced though, I hate hot liquids!
I also feel it’s necessary to lay some ground work here and note an important component to my story: my mother is a type 1 diabetic and was diagnosed as a teenager. I would say that prior to my diagnosis, I had a good working knowledge of what type 1 diabetes was; at least what it was in my mother’s life.
I knew how hypoglycemic symptoms presented in her and understood what needed to be done in order to correct them. However, because she has always managed her disease on her own, I was not completely aware of the intricacies of this disease and the risks and side effects associated with it.
To be honest, I never truly understood the seriousness of it because I didn’t have the scientific knowledge behind it. It was something that was always a part of her life and it was our normal. My mother had been diagnosed with the disease long before I came along and she always knew how to take good care of herself Continue reading

High fructose corn syrup linked to diabetes

High fructose corn syrup linked to diabetes

A new study by USC and University of Oxford researchers indicated that large amounts of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in national food supplies across the world may be one explanation for the rising global epidemic of Type 2 diabetes and resulting higher health care costs.
According to the study, which was published in Global Public Health, countries that use HFCS in their food supply had a 20 percent higher prevalence of diabetes than countries that did not use it. The analysis also revealed that the HFCS association with the “significantly increased prevalence of diabetes” occurred independent of total sugar intake and obesity levels.
“HFCS appears to pose a serious public health problem on a global scale,” said principal study author Michael Goran, professor of preventive medicine, director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center and co-director of the Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. “The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates HFCS consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar.”
The paper reported that out of 42 countries studied, the United States has the highest per-capita consumption of HFCS at a rate of 25 kilograms, or 55 pounds, per year. The second highest is Hungary, with an annual rate of 16 kilograms, or 47 pounds, per capita. Argentina, Belgium , Bulgaria, Canada, Japan, Korea, Mexico and Slovakia are also relatively high HFCS consumers. Egypt, Finland, Germany, Greece, Poland, Portugal and Serbia are Continue reading

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