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Research Shows The Important Role Of Gut Bacteria In Preventing And Treating Type 1 Diabetes

Research shows the important role of gut bacteria in preventing and treating type 1 diabetes

Research shows the important role of gut bacteria in preventing and treating type 1 diabetes

Scientists have discovered new evidence of the importance of gut bacteria in terms of averting and treating conditions such as type 1 diabetes.
It is already known, namely that certain common variants of HLA/MHC genes protect against a range of autoimmune diseases, particularly type 1 diabetes. Yet how these genes and the tiny cell proteins they regulate yield their immune modulating effects has remained shrouded in mystery.
Now, a study in mice led by scientists at Harvard Medical School reveals that at least one of these genes has a protective influence that is powerfully shaped by the trillions of intestinal bacteria collectively known as the gut microbiota.
In the study, researchers worked with mice bred to spontaneously develop diabetes, the classic animal model for studying the disease. However, this particular group was also bred to carry a protective gene variant shown in earlier studies to ward off type 1 diabetes despite the animals’ heavy predisposition to the disease.
When treated with antibiotics in the first six weeks of life, mice went on to develop pancreatic inflammation, a precursor to type 1 diabetes, despite carrying the guardian gene. Treatment with antibiotics later in life, between six and 10 weeks after birth, did not lead to loss of protection against diabetes.
The observation suggests a period during which the new born gut is seeded by various germs, the researchers say. Interfering with that process by administering antibiotics appears to disrupt the balance of the gut microbiota, which in turn leads to loss of genetic protection, the researcher Continue reading

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Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes


Traveling makes diabetes management harder. Diabetes doesnt take a vacation just because you do. Here are some guidelines on traveling safely from experts and bloggers. (Many of these tips have to do with insulin, but not all.)
Get your supplies together. The travel insurance company Insurancewith says , Its often advised for [people with diabetes] to carry a pack in their hand luggage, with everything theyd need for the journey. This would include injection pens, insulin, sensors, pumps, and spare pump batteries. Insulin and blood sugar monitoring equipment and emergency snacks should always be readily available. If you check them in, you may not have them when you need them. Or they may end up lost.
Our blogger Amy Mercer found out about keeping supplies handy on a trip to the Bahamas. Changing planes in Atlanta, she wanted to eat, but she had no syringe for her insulin. She had used the one in her carrying case and forgotten to bring others in her carry-on luggage. Her sugar climbed to over 300 before the plane landed and she could get her insulin syringes back.
Insurancewith says bring twice as many supplies as you need. Double up on all of it. Your trip could run long, supplies could be damaged, or you could need more than usual because of the demands of traveling.
You should also consider bringing a back-up pump and monitoring equipment.
Kathleen Stanley, a certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian in Lexington, Kentucky, says If you take insulin with syringes, think about how youll carry and dispose of your syringes or pen needles.
Padded insulin t Continue reading

Basics of Diabetes Mellitus.

Basics of Diabetes Mellitus.

Diabetes Mellitus is defined as the impaired response of the human body to insulin. This results in increased levels of glucose in the blood that causes different complications. The increased levels of glucose in the blood are called hyperglycemia. , in other words, s Diabetes Mellitus is the name of hyperglycemia and resulting complications that is due to an impaired response of the body to insulin.
Types of Diabetes Mellitus:
There are two types of DM:
Insulin Dependent Diabetes or Type 1 Diabetes:
In this type, insulin is not produced properly by the body. This causes decreased uptake of glucose by the cells from the blood. As a result, the level of glucose in the blood rises causing hyperglycemia. As insulin is deficient in this type of diabetes, the patient must receive insulin regularly to keep the glucose levels in the blood within normal ranges. That is why this type is called Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.
Insulin Independent Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes:
In this type, Insulin is produced in a proper amount by the body but the receptors on the cell where insulin binds, are defective or less in number. That is why the body is resistant to insulin. The end result is again decreased uptake of glucose into the cell from the blood which results in hyperglycemia. As the insulin is sufficient for this type that is why it is called Insulin Independent Diabetes Mellitus.
What is insulin?
Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that binds to their receptors on the body cells and causes entry of glucose from the blood into the cells. This glucose is then utilized b Continue reading

Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels

Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels


Diabetes Alert: Biotin and Chromium Help Control Glucose Levels
Diabetes affects people worldwide and can be incredibly difficult to manage. The significant impact that this condition has on the body can lead to severe fatigue, pain in the extremities, and fluctuations in weight. Because these symptoms can be debilitating, combatting them and the condition that causes them can be frustrating. One of the greatest challenges that comes with a diabetic condition is regulating blood sugar levels. This is further exaggerated for those who are obese. Thankfully, as more information becomes available regarding diabetes, better means of treatment are becoming known.
A great deal of research has been put into understanding and treating diabetes but many who suffer from this condition still have trouble managing proper blood sugar levels. Eating right, properly medicating, and being mindful of ones insulin and glucose levels are important in combatting diabetes. Even if someone is successfully doing these, they may feel as though they need more assistance. Fortunately, there are elements available that further aid in keeping blood glucose balanced. Studies have found that biotin and chromium provide notable benefits for those looking to combat diabetes.
Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, belongs in the powerful family of B complex vitamins . This group is known for aiding various bodily functions that promote better health. Biotin is of particular interest for diabetics because of the role it plays in regulating blood sugar levels, the metabolization of fatty acids, and glucose p Continue reading

Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring


Sensing the Big Picture With Continuous Glucose Monitoring
by By Laura Hieronymus, DNP, MSEd, RN, MLDE, BC-ADM, CDE, FAADE, and Angela Hepner, MEd, RD, LD, MLDE, CDE, CDTC
When you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose is a crucial part of your treatment plan. Knowing your blood glucose values can help you avoid short-term problems such as hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). Ongoing optimal blood glucose control can help you prevent or delay long-term diabetes complications such as diabetes-related eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage.
Blood glucose monitors (often called meters) are such mainstays of diabetes care that most insurers, including Medicare, cover their cost. Certain conditions typically limit how often you can get a new meter and the amount of supplies that are covered on a daily basis. In some cases, this may restrict the frequency of your monitoring. To help make the most out of the supplies you have, work with your diabetes care team to determine the optimal times of day to check your blood glucose.
In less than two decades, the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for people with diabetes has gained popularity worldwide. This is largely due to improvement in the technology, the reliability of the information, and ease of use. A CGM system uses a tiny sensor less than one inch long inserted just below the skin. An electrode measures your blood glucose levels within the tissue fluid rather than directly from your blood. A transmitter attached to the sensor sends blood glucose information to a w Continue reading

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