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Reach Your Goals With Our Proven Program

Reach your goals with our proven program

Reach your goals with our proven program

Participants who
followed our type 2 menu
lost 3x more weight
than those receiving
usual care
Participants also
achieved a lower HbA1c
of 6.6% as compared to 7.5%
for usual care while showing
greater improvements in HDL
(good) cholesterol and
triglyceride levels
72% of participants
reduced or eliminated
their use of insulin
A recent review of 10 commercial weight loss programs by researchers at Johns Hopkins published in the June issue of Obesity Reviews Journal‡, found that only those individuals with type 2 diabetes following the Jenny Craig program reduced hemoglobin A1c -- a three-month average of blood sugar concentrations -- more than weight loss counseling at 12 months.
Jenny Craig was recommended as one option due to its strong evidence to support diabetes benefits.
Take the guesswork out of diabetes meal planning with our easy to follow, calorie + carbohydrate controlled type 2 menu that gives you the right balance of nutrients to lose weight, yet has a variety of delicious flavors to keep you excited about what you’re eating.
Your dedicated personal consultant designs strategies to help you reach your weight loss goals and hit your diabetes targets, while giving you weekly one-on-one support, either in person or over the phone.
In an independent study Jenny Craig participants following the lower carbohydrate menu for diabetes lost 3x more weight than those receiving usual care, achieved a lower HbA1c of 6.6% as compared to 7.5% for usual care, while showing greater improvements in HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides.† Continue reading

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Diabetes pill might replace injection to control blood sugar

Diabetes pill might replace injection to control blood sugar

An injectable class of diabetes medication — called glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1 — might one day be available in pill form, research suggests.
Based on the results of a global phase 2 clinical trial, the study authors reported a significant drop in blood sugar levels for people on the oral medication, and no significant increase in low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) compared to a placebo over six months.
The findings also showed that people taking the highest dose of the pill lost a large amount of weight — about 15 pounds — compared to a weight loss of fewer than 3 pounds for people on the inactive placebo pill.
The research was funded by Novo Nordisk, the company that makes the drug, called oral semaglutide.
"Semaglutide could transform diabetes treatment," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y.
"Glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists are agents that are highly recommended according to diabetes guidelines, but rarely used because they require injection. Most patients prefer a pill," Courgi explained.
Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, agreed that these new findings were exciting.
"This medication looks pretty good. The high dose matched the [injection] version. There was low hypoglycemia. It controls blood glucose. There was weight loss and it's not an injection. This is the same molecule that's been shown [as an injection] to decrease cardiovascular mortality," Zonszein said.
"It has all the ingredients for an excellent medication. If this Continue reading

Add These To Your Atta (Flour) To Make It Diabetes-Friendly

Add These To Your Atta (Flour) To Make It Diabetes-Friendly

Expert-reviewed by Ashwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience.
Fact-checked by Aditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics.
In diabetes, you indeed are what you eat. This is all the more critical when it comes to choosing to right kind of atta (or flour).
As with everything else they eat, diabetics must choose a flour that can be digested slowly, is high in fibre, low in carbs and calories to maintain blood sugar levels. Considering all this topped with the wide variety of “diabetes-friendly” attas (flours) available in the market today – one might think it is easier never to eat anything made with flour again!
But wait, help is at hand! Because today, we have the full scoop for you on which varieties and types of flours are best suited for people with diabetes.
The perfect recipe for diabetes-friendly flour
According to Dr. Jyoti Sawant, Dietitian at Delhi-based Obino, “The best flour for people with diabetes would be to eat standalone or a good mix of multigrain flour. Mix whole grains, such as finger millets (ragi or nachni), millets (bajra), barley (jau), soya beans, sorghum (jowar), amaranth grains (ramdana/rajgira), and chickpea flour (Bengal gram or kabuli chana) and your perfect diabetes-friendly flour is ready. All of these ingredients have a rich nutritional profile and are high in dietary fibre with complex carbohydrate content.Making multigrain flour an excellent choice for controlling blood sugar spikes and managing weight.”
How to make diabetes-friendly flour at home
Indian brea Continue reading

This Protein Could Be Spreading Type 2 Diabetes Like Mad Cow Disease

This Protein Could Be Spreading Type 2 Diabetes Like Mad Cow Disease

A type of misbehaving protein might be behind some cases of type 2 diabetes, indicating the condition could potentially be contracted through blood transfusions and organ transplants, or passed to children before birth.
While a lot more research needs to be done to determine if the risks to the general public are in any way significant, the find has established a new area of study in how the disease develops and spreads inside individuals.
Led by researchers from the University of Texas, the study used mice to test whether clumps of a misfolded protein called amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) taken from a pancreas can spread and produce diabetes-like symptoms when transferred between individuals.
Unlike its sister disease type 1 diabetes, type 2 – or diabetes mellitus – is a condition that forms over time, reducing a person's ability to produce or respond to insulin.
The disease is far more common that type 1, affecting just under half a billion people worldwide, but its exact causes are still vague. Researchers have identified genetic and environmental factors, but there is still a lot to learn about how many people develop the condition.
Toxic clumps of misfolded proteins similar to those in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease have previously been associated with type 2 diabetes. But finding a link isn't the same thing as identifying a cause, so researchers have now taken a closer look at the amyloid proteins in the pancreas to trace their pathology.
Proteins such as IAPP can twist into forms that are more likely to clump as a result of mutations, which has al Continue reading

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes?
If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes?
Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes.
Susan’s story
Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year.
She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse.
The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt.
When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes?
I suggest reading the following articles:
We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found.
Polyphag Continue reading

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