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Pump May Beat Shots For Type 1 Diabetes

Pump May Beat Shots for Type 1 Diabetes

Pump May Beat Shots for Type 1 Diabetes


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TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In young people with type 1 diabetes , insulin pump therapy may offer better blood sugar control and fewer complications than daily injections of the vital hormone, new German research suggests.
" Insulin pumps work, and they work even somewhat better than multiple daily injections overall," said Dr. Robert Rapaport, chief of the division of pediatric endocrinology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.
Dr. Siham Accacha, a pediatric endocrinologist at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, N.Y., explained why that might be so.
"If the pump is really taken care of, you can micromanage your diabetes ," she said. "You can stop the pump if your blood glucose is coming down, or you can give a bit more insulin if it's going up."
Both Rapaport and Accacha prefer pump use, but if patients would rather do multiple daily injections, the doctors said that excellent control can also be maintained with shots. It's really a matter of patient preference, they noted.
One issue with the pump is price. The start-up cost for a pump can be as much as $5,000, according to Accacha. And there are monthly costs for supplies as well. Insurers, especially Medicaid, sometimes hesitate to pay, both experts said. But studies like this latest one help provide more evidence about the importance of pump therapy.
"Pumps are more expensive, but I don't think expense should guide quality of Continue reading

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Zumbathon charity event to raise money for American Diabetes Association

Zumbathon charity event to raise money for American Diabetes Association


Zumbathon charity event to raise money for American Diabetes Association
The inaugural Zumbathon Charity Event for the American Diabetes Association in 2016. LAUREN HALLIGAN [email protected]
Capital Region Zumba instructors Holly Rose, Melissa Mace, Concetta Snyder, Brianne Bixby, Drew Howard, Liz Fisher, Ashley Walden, Anna Rivelo, Lisa Wheeler Camp, Amy Murray and event organizer Mayumi Kato at the inaugural Zumbathon Charity Event for the American Diabetes Association in 2016. LAUREN HALLIGAN [email protected]
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y.>> All are invited to dance for a cause at the upcoming second annual Zumbathon Charity Event for the American Diabetes Association.
The fundraising event will take place at 2 p.m. on April 9 at the Saratoga Springs High School gymnasium. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m.
More than 10 local Zumba instructors will dance with people from across the region to raise money to further the mission of the American Diabetes Association: to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all those affected by diabetes.
This annual event comes ahead of the June 4 Saratoga Springs Tour de Cure, a major one-day cycling fundraiser created to benefit the American Diabetes Association.
All funds raised at the April event will go directly to the American Diabetes Association as part of the Saratoga Springs Tour de Cure in June.
This local Zumbathon was started last year by Zumba instructor Mayumi Kato of the Saratoga Regional YMCA.
Kato has been riding the Tour de Cure to raise money for American Diabetes Association as Continue reading

Student, professor talk life with Type One Diabetes

Student, professor talk life with Type One Diabetes


Student, professor talk life with Type One Diabetes
For Amy Trauger, daily injections are just one of the many life-altering impacts Type One Diabetes has on her life, and the lives of around 1.25 million Americans, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.
Type One Diabetes, which is most commonly diagnosed in children, teenagers and young adults, is an autoimmune disease which causes the immune system to attack insulin-producing cells.
Scientists are unsure why T1D occurs, but research shows it is likely a result of the genetic predisposition of a person being triggered by environmental factors.
Trauger, an associate geography professor at the University of Georgia, was diagnosed at the age of four in 1980, a time when life for someone with T1D looked drastically different than it looks today.
In the 1980s, Trauger said an at-home blood glucose meter was a lot less efficient than blood glucose meters today. Although she had an at home meter, she said having one at all was not common for diabetics at the time.
We had a blood glucose meter that we had to plug into the wall and let it warm up, Trauger said. It was really hard to even get a home glucose monitor because people didnt think it was something you would do at home. Most people were just doing urine ketone tests to see if their sugar was too high, which is a little too late to be managing it.
Riley Jenkins, who was also diagnosed as a child at the age of 11, grew up having access to very different technologies than Trauger had when she was diagnosed.
All the new technologies just help so much Continue reading

Pancreatic Cancer Sign: Rapid Deterioration of Diabetes Control

Pancreatic Cancer Sign: Rapid Deterioration of Diabetes Control


Home / Specialties / Oncology / Pancreatic Cancer Sign: Rapid Deterioration of Diabetes Control
Pancreatic Cancer Sign: Rapid Deterioration of Diabetes Control
At diagnosis and shortly thereafter, if their control deteriorates rapidly it could be a sign of asymptomatic pancreatic cancer.
550,000 diabetes patients participated in a study where they found that patients who received glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, or incretin mimetics, were at significantly increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
However, the researchers observed that the increased risk diminished rapidly after diagnosis of diabetes. Given that they also found that the risk for pancreatic cancer was markedly increased after starting insulin therapy, they suggested that reverse causation may be in play, with asymptomatic pancreatic cancer initially causing diabetes before progressing to a symptomatic stage.
Medical professionals should be aware that their diabetes patients should be aware that the onset of diabetes or rapidly deteriorating diabetes control could be the first sign of hidden pancreatic cancer, and steps should be taken to investigate it. As of today there is currently no good, noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic pancreatic cancer.
The researchers added that they hope the results will encourage the search for blood markers indicating the presence of pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic cancer are not diagnosed at a curable stage.
Dr. Auther added that, this study opens up the possibility of combining the diagnosis of an associated disease, Continue reading

Are Apples Good for Diabetics?

Are Apples Good for Diabetics?


Apples may help mitigate the risk of complications related to diabetes
Apples have all the vital nutrients and antioxidants
Apples and all other fruits are widely known as part of a healthy diet. But for a diabetic, choosing a fruit is not that simple as you may be concerned with its impact on blood sugar levels . Many fruits have natural sugars considered as carbohydrates. If you are counting carbs, be sure to consider how much you are consuming.
Like other fruits, apples also have natural sugar which is transformed into glucose. But eating too much carbohydrate can cause high blood sugar levels. According to American Diabetes Association (ADA), high fiber apples should be added in a diabetic meal plan as long as they work in your target of carbohydrate intake.
The popular saying an apple a day keeps the doctor away is made for a good reason. Apple is rich in vitamin C and fiber. These nutrients are found mostly in the fruits skin. Make sure not to leave that part. Apples are also rich in small amounts of calcium, vitamin A and iron.
Since they are rich in fiber, consistent consumption of apple may lead to promote your digestion system and to keep waste flushing out of the body. Fresh apples are cholesterol -free, fat-free, rich in fiber, and are sodium-free. Apples also have polyphenols and other natural antioxidants. These are found in both meat and skin of the apple. So, you are not going to miss them. These antioxidants are very vital for your body as they can help
Must Read: Is Avocado Good or Bad for Diabetics?
A tennis ball-sized, small or one-half large a Continue reading

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