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Psoriasis Severity Linked To Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Psoriasis Severity Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Psoriasis Severity Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

PHILADELPHIA – People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found people with psoriasis that covers 10 percent of their body or more are 64 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, independent of traditional risk factors such as body weight. Applying the study’s findings to the number of people who have psoriasis worldwide would equate to 125,650 new cases of diabetes attributable to psoriasis per year. They published their findings this month in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Psoriasis is a disease of the immune system in which inflammation causes skin cells to multiply faster than normal. They cause raised, red patches covered by silvery scales when they reach the surface of the skin and die. It occurs most commonly on the scalp, knees, elbows, hands, and feet, but can also appear on the lower back, face, genitals, nails, and other places. The American Academy of Dermatology estimates psoriasis affects about 7.5 million Americans.
“The type of inflammation seen in psoriasis is known to promote insulin resistance, and psoriasis and diabetes share similar genetic mutations suggesting a biological basis for the connection between the two conditions we found in our study,” said the study’s senior author Joel M. Gelfand, MD MSCE, a professor of Dermatology and Epidemiology at Penn. “We know psoriasis is link Continue reading

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The Best Nuts for Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, and More

The Best Nuts for Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, and More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas.
Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart
The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association.
Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.”
What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinica Continue reading

Top 4 Snack Bars for Diabetes

Top 4 Snack Bars for Diabetes

Snack bars may be convenient, but they also can match up nutritionally to a standard candy bar. With excess sugar, fat, and added ingredients, it's important to read labels and know what kind of bars you are getting.
No Idle Snack Bar Eating
Make sure you eat them for a reason. For example, pre-workout fuel to prevent low blood sugar, or to tide hunger between meals when you are on-the-go. But, remember that not all bars are created equal—some don't stack up nutritionally to others.
I asked my patients and peer Certified Diabetes Educators to tell me their favorite snack bars based on flavor and blood sugar results. Before I reveal the "best picks," here are some basic guidelines and things to think about before buying a snack bar.
General Guidelines to Choosing a Healthy Snack Bar
There is no real science behind this, rather just trial and error and professional opinion. I tell my patients to aim to keep the counts close to this:
Sugar content less than 10 grams (the lower the better)
Carbohydrates less than 30 grams (depending on what you are eating it for)
Protein at least 5 grams (this will help you to feel full and reduce the likelihood of blood sugar crashes)
Fiber at least 3 grams
Calories less than 250
If you need a bar that is gluten free, vegan, or nut free make sure you read ingredients carefully
Keeping snacks to about 250 calories or less can help to prevent weight gain and keep metabolism revved up.
When Should You Eat a Snack Bar?
If you are running late to work and need a quick breakfast, a snack bar can be a good choice. To complete the meal, pair it with Continue reading

Why Cinnamon for Diabetes Treatment is Among Most Simple, Effective Solutions

Why Cinnamon for Diabetes Treatment is Among Most Simple, Effective Solutions

Cinnamon is indeed a powerful, health-boosting food. It’s been used for centuries in holistic medicines—for everything from the common cold to stomach disturbances. But more recent research shows that cinnamon health benefits aren’t merely restricted to protecting against the cold – cinnamon for diabetes treatment may actually be one of the most simple and effective of diabetes solutions.
Why Everyone Should Consider Using Cinnamon for Protection Against Diabetes
For a study, which was published in the Journal of Diabetic Medicine, a group of adults diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were split into two different groups. The first group was given your run-of-the-mill insulin controlling pharmaceuticals, while the other group was given two grams of cinnamon every day. What the researchers found 12 weeks later was remarkable, to say the least.
The group who was given drugs from Big Pharma didn’t measure up to the cinnamon group. Those on the daily regimen of cinnamon experienced lower fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels than the other group and showed reduced body fat overall.
A British review of eight different studies also showed why everyone should be using cinnamon for diabetes, finding that every study agreed on cinnamon’s effectiveness in reducing fasting blood sugar levels and reducing blood sugar after a meal.
Another study, this one from the United States, found that 22 subjects monitored for blood sugar and body fat experienced positive results in both areas when supplementing with cinnamon. Cinnamon actually showed benefits in reducing overall body fat and Continue reading

Consumer Driven Innovation for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes Patients

Consumer Driven Innovation for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes Patients

Imagine if your life suddenly depended on monitoring your body’s reaction every time you had a snack, skipped a meal, or ate a piece of candy. This is a reality for approximately 1.25 million people in the USA who have been diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D).
People with T1D experience unhealthy fluctuations in blood glucose levels due to the destruction of beta cells in the pancreas by the person’s own immune system. Beta cells produce insulin, which is a hormone that allows your body to break down, use, or store glucose, while maintaining a healthy blood sugar level throughout the day. Presently, there is no cure for T1D so patients must be constantly vigilant about maintaining their blood glucose levels within a healthy range in order to avoid potentially deadly consequences.
Currently, continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) are the most effective way to manage T1D. However, consumers have already become frustrated with the limitations of commercially available CGMs, and are developing at-home modifications to overcome them. This in turn, is influencing the direction of research and development in the biomedical devices industry, as multiple companies compete to create a CGM that appeals to the largest consumer population.
Thus, consumer-driven innovation in CGM data access, CGM-insulin pump integration, and glucose sensor lifespan has led to rapid growth in the field of diabetes management devices.
Coping with the Highs and Lows
Patients with T1D need to monitor their blood glucose levels to ensure they don’t become hyperglycemic (high blood glucose levels), or hypo Continue reading

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