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Probiotics Have Adjunctive Role In Diabetes Care

Probiotics Have Adjunctive Role in Diabetes Care

Probiotics Have Adjunctive Role in Diabetes Care

Nearly a decade ago, microbiome researchers began publishing reports suggesting that bacteria in the intestines play a role in glucose metabolism. Recent studies support that thesis, and provide a basis for use of probiotics as adjunctive treatments for people with type 2 diabetes.
The notion that microflora can affect insulin sensitivity has its roots in a landmark study by Nadja Larsen and colleagues at the University of Copenhagen. The Danish team showed that people with T2D have striking compositional changes in their intestinal flora compared to non-diabetic subjects.
Moreover, they found that the ratio of Bacteroidetes (“bad” bacteria) to Firmicutes (“good” bacteria) significantly correlated with reduced glucose tolerance (Larsen N, et al. PLoS One. 2010 Feb 5;5(2):e9085).
Since then, many groups have explored the use of probiotic supplements to alter the microbial ecosystem to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. A number of these studies are turning up positive findings.
Small, Meaningful Changes
In a study published in late 2016, 46 patients with type 2 diabetes who were already on insulin therapy were randomly assigned to receive low-dose or high-dose Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 supplements, or a placebo for 12 weeks. The low-dose probiotic regimen provided 108 colony-forming units (CFU) per day; the high-dose preparation contained 1010 CFU. The patients took the probiotics in addition to standard insulin treatments.
At the end of the study, those on the highest dose of L.reuteri had increases in insulin sensitivity index (ISI) scores, a Continue reading

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Diabetes-Friendly Soups & Stews

Diabetes-Friendly Soups & Stews

Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan.
Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan.
Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan.
Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Continue reading

Eating chilli and smoking cannabis ‘could help cure diabetes and colitis – by calming the gut’

Eating chilli and smoking cannabis ‘could help cure diabetes and colitis – by calming the gut’

WHAT do chilli spice and cannabis have in common?
On the face of it, very little. But, scientists hope both could help develop new treatments for type 1 diabetes and the gut disease colitis.
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When eaten, both interact with the same receptor in our stomachs, new findings suggest.
And the result is they help calm the gut, scientists at the University of Connecticut found.
Mice fed both chilli peppers and the class B drug showed less inflammation in their guts.
And, the researchers even found they were able to reverse type 1 diabetes in some mice, by feeding them the fiery pepper.
The chilli was found to bind itself to a receptor called TRPV1, which is found in the gut, oesophagus and pancreas.
When it bound itself to the receptor it created a compound called anandamide, which is chemically similar to cannabinoids found in marijuana.
It was this compound that caused the immune system of the mice to calm down, by reducing inflammation, and the same happened when they were fed anandamide directly.
Reducing inflammation in the pancreas could help in the treatment of diabetes because the pancreas is responsible for maintaining insulin and glucose levels in the body.
A person with diabetes has too much glucose in their system and the pancreas is unable to regulate it.
The brain also creates anandamides when receptors in the brain react to people getting high, but scientists have not known why those receptors exist in the past.
Pramod Srivastava, professor of immunology and medicine at the university, said: "This allows you to imagine ways the immune system and the brain Continue reading

Leading Diabetes Groups Publish Consensus Statement on

Leading Diabetes Groups Publish Consensus Statement on "Beyond A1C" Measures to Guide FDA, Researchers

The Beyond A1C movement seeks regulatory and clinical are frameworks that recognize the day-to-day measures that matter to patients, such as how often they experience hypoglycemia.
After 2 years of work, a consortium of leading diabetes groups published a statement Tuesday that they hope will guide the FDA when it evaluates how drugs and devices affect the everyday health of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D).
The statement, appearing in the journal Diabetes Care, defines stages of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, and diabetic ketoacidosisis (DKA). It is a milestone in the “Beyond A1C” movement, an effort by diabetes clinicians and advocates to get regulators—and payers—to recognize management tools based on criteria other than their ability to control glycated hemoglobin (A1C).
Organized by JDRF, the Steering Committee for the Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes Program issued the statement, “Standardizing Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures Beyond HbA1C for Type 1 Diabetes.” The committee includes members of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and T1D Exchange.
The statement acknowledges what people living with T1D tell clinicians and researchers—while A1C is a useful measure, it fails to capture the day-to-day experience of living with a disease that some describe as a blood sugar roller coaster. JDRF said in a stat Continue reading

Is your skin warning you that you have diabetes?

Is your skin warning you that you have diabetes?

When your body is in trouble, sometimes the warning signs are right in your face —literally. Skin complications can be the first indication of diabetes. If your skin starts flashing warning signs like the examples below, your body’s largest organ may be trying to tell you something.
Although skin complications are often a package deal with a diabetes diagnosis, you can still prevent them from occurring and recurring. Diagnosing skin issues with a board-certified dermatologist is your first step toward conquering them.
These are common skin complications linked to diabetes:
Itchy, dry skin
When your body can’t make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin well, sugars accumulate in blood. This high blood glucose is recognized by your body as dangerous, so it attempts to remove the excess by increasing urination. Loss of fluid puts your body into a rationed state, causing your skin to become dry. Dry skin triggers many related surface-symptoms, such as itchiness, cracking and redness.
Bacterial infections
One sign your diabetes isn’t being managed is frequent bacterial infections. High blood glucose levels make you more prone to infection. Research shows that more than 80 percent of diabetes-related hospitalizations due to infections are from bacterial infections. Most bacterial infections require a prescription for treatment.
Fungal infections
Bacterial infections aren’t the only infections to watch for if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is also linked to an increase in fungal infections from organisms such as tinea and candida. Most commonly, th Continue reading

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