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Preventing, Reversing And Managing Diabetes Naturally

Preventing, Reversing and Managing Diabetes Naturally

Preventing, Reversing and Managing Diabetes Naturally

More health practitioners today are recognizing both the mind-body connection, as well as energetic and metaphysical insights into preventing and reversing illnesses. As a result, those facing diabetes and other health challenges are accessing contemporary resources such as Louise L. Hay’s explanation of the emotional roots of disease in You Can Heal Your Life, and the medical science and natural methods explained by health researcher and author Gary Null, Ph.D., in No More Diabetes: A Complete Guide to Preventing, Treating, and Overcoming Diabetes.
Applying a “both” rather than an “either” approach illuminates the importance of recognizing the ways our thoughts, emotions and lifestyle choices can impact chronic illness and long-term health.
Two Perspectives
Hay suggests that this metabolic disorder may be rooted in a feeling of being deprived of life’s sweetness and longing for what might have been, accompanied by a great need to control deep sorrow. Such chronic unease can show up as Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes; Type 2, or non-insulin-dependent diabetes; latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), a slowly progressing variation of Type 1; or gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy.
Eavesdropping on our repetitive inner mind chatter and observing its impact on outer experiences can reveal faulty thinking that disrupts the mind-body connection. Hay, a firm believer in the power of affirmations to send a message to the subconscious mind, recommends them to aid healing. For diabetes, she suggests, “This moment is filled with joy. I now ch Continue reading

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Senior Diabetes Prevention: 7 Tips to Reduce Your Risk

Senior Diabetes Prevention: 7 Tips to Reduce Your Risk

Over 25% of seniors age 65 and older are living with diabetes, some not even knowing they have the disease. Having diabetes can lead to serious complications over time, including heart disease, kidney damage and vision loss – but in many cases, the damage is preventable.
Types of Diabetes
For National Diabetes Month, we’d like to highlight what seniors can do to prevent diabetes or lower their risk if they have it.
To start, we need to clarify that there are two main types of diabetes:
Type 1 Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is the least common of the two types and it isn’t preventable. Typically appearing while someone’s still relatively young, Type 1 diabetes is neither curable or preventable, but it is manageable if you cultivate the right healthy habits – like being careful with their diet and taking insulin for the rest of their lives. In fact, today’s seniors are the first generation where a large number of people with Type 1 diabetes have been able to live into their senior years with minimal complications.
Type 2 Diabetes
The more common form of diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, is preventable. Getting it is largely related to lifestyle and it usually shows up a bit later in life, in people middle aged and older. Lifestyle changes can make a difference in preventing Type 2 diabetes before it occurs, as well as being able to reverse the effects of it after it’s been diagnosed.
What You Can Do to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
One of the main goals of National Diabetes Month is to help people understand the lifestyle changes they can make proactively to avoid a diagnosis of T Continue reading

Pregnant and Pumping

Pregnant and Pumping

Great Expectations
A healthy pregnancy with diabetes is a challenge, but consider this: Less than 100 years ago, before the discovery of insulin, many young women with Type 1 diabetes didn’t even live to reach childbearing age. And less than 30 years ago, physicians routinely told young women with Type 1 diabetes that pregnancy was far too dangerous for both mother and child. Today, thanks to advances in diabetes treatment, plus improvements in medical care for infants, there has never been a better time for you to have a healthy baby. Insulin pump therapy is one of the options available to women today for managing diabetes during pregnancy.
Challenges of pregnancy
Pregnancy with diabetes presents a variety of challenges for you and your diabetes management team far beyond the routine morning sickness, fatigue, and strange food cravings experienced by many women who are expecting. The length of time you’ve had diabetes as well as the course of your disease influences the seriousness of medical risks during your pregnancy. For example, if you have mild retinopathy, it may progress during pregnancy. Your kidney status could worsen. Women with diabetes are at higher risk for frequent and severe hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) during pregnancy because glucose crosses the placenta to provide nutrition for the growing baby. The pregnancy state also tends to allow diabetic ketoacidosis — a dangerous condition usually accompanied by very high blood glucose — to develop quickly. Having a thorough medical evaluation prior to pregnancy is extremely important for determining y Continue reading

Possible new view of diabetes

Possible new view of diabetes

It's hard to change entrenched ideas in science.
Protein is the genetic material.
Genes are continuous and immobile.
The genome consists of 120,000 genes; no, 80,000; no, 60,000; no, 20,325.
What we know about the natural world changes as we learn more. That's why there's no such thing as scientific "proof," just evidence, hypotheses, and, rarely, enough findings to support a theory. Science is evidence-based, from observations and experiments. We don't "believe" in evolution or climate change as if it is a religion. Yet presenting evidence that challenges a long-held idea can be difficult for a researcher.
Bryon Petersen, PhD, director of the Pediatric Stem Cell Research and Hepatic Disorders Child Health Research Institute at the University of Florida is in the uncomfortable position of challenging dogma, knows that well. His findings suggest that type 1 diabetes (T1D) might not directly be autoimmune in origin, and that tracking blood glucose might not be the only way to manage the disease.
His team has just published a paper in the journal Laboratory Investigation, "Suppression of islet homeostasis protein thwarts diabetes mellitus progression," that puts a little-known molecule on the radar: islet homeostasis protein, aka IHoP.
People with type 1 diabetes make too much IHoP. Plus, experiments in mice and humans show that decreasing IHoP restores blood glucose control and increases the number of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Perhaps most importantly, excess IHoP is in the blood of patients, making it a possible new biomarker for T1D.
Anatomy of a pancrea Continue reading

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Paula’s story
Paula came to see mcomplaining that her urine smelt funny. She had been referred to through a friend who had diabetes, and who thought that I might be able to help Paula understand why her pee smelled funny.
“My friend told me my urine smells like diabetes,” said Paula. “She said she had that same fruity smell when she got diagnosed.”
Paula said her urine smelled like, “Sugar Smacks,” of all things. I suspected that Paula may have Type 2 Diabetes, but we needed to run some lab tests in order to confirm this suspicion
We tested her urine using a urinalysis. She had high levels of glucose in her urine. After the urinalysis, we ran a random blood sugar, which detected her levels at 798 mg/dL. With the results at hand, Paula was diagnosed with diabetes. She had to start on insulin seemingly right off the bat, as other oral medications wouldn’t control her diabetes. She had weight to lose, and goals to reach. While she’s a work in progress,her urine no longer smells like Sugar Smacks.
What exactly is urine made of ?
Urine is a clear, yellow liquid produced by the body to handle the wastes from normal body metabolism. When nitrogenous by-products build up in the blood from cellular metabolism, it must be cleared from the bloodstream.
In our bodies, some of our toxic waste from metabolism is excreted through perspiration as urea. The rest is handled by an intricate filter system that makes up the human urinary system.
The kidneys work through processes of filtering waste, reabsorption, and tubular secretion. They make urine through this complex filt Continue reading

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