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Preventing Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

Preventing Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

Preventing Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

When was the last time you had a chat with your doctor about your liver? Can’t remember? Maybe never? Well, it’s probably time to do so. Most people who have diabetes think very little about the connection between liver disease and Type 2 diabetes. But statistics show that at least 50% of those with Type 2 will develop fatty liver disease, and some research shows that figure may even be as high as 70%.
What is fatty liver disease?
To be more exact, fatty liver disease is technically called “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,” or NAFLD, for short. As the name implies, it’s characterized by a buildup of fat in the liver that’s unrelated to drinking alcohol. The extent of fat buildup can determine the extent of liver damage, ranging from a small accumulation of fat (called steatosis) to a large amount that causes inflammation (called steatohepatitis). Without treatment, NAFLD can progress to cirrhosis (chronic scarring and damage), liver failure, and possibly liver cancer.
What causes NAFLD?
NAFLD is becoming increasingly common; in fact, it’s the most common type of liver disease in the developed world. It’s also a very complex condition. There’s no one specific cause, but it appears that this disease is linked to:
• Being overweight or obese
• Having insulin resistance (a condition whereby the body doesn’t use its own insulin properly)
• Having high blood sugar levels (prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes)
• Having high levels of fat, called triglycerides, in the blood
• Having sleep apnea
• Having PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome)
In addition, NAFLD Continue reading

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Sex and Diabetes

Sex and Diabetes

When my neighbor Leon was diagnosed with diabetes, he had one fear. “Sex is very important to me,” he said. “And to my wife, Carol. Will I still be able to have sex with diabetes?”
Leon has a legitimate concern. According to some estimates, up to 75% of men and 50% of women with diabetes develop sexual problems at some point. But the answer is yes. Leon and Carol may have to make some changes, but they can have good sex with diabetes. You can too.
Diabetes’ effect on sex
Poorly controlled diabetes can hurt your love life in several ways.
• High blood sugars can block blood vessels and damage nerves in the genital organs. These complications can prevent or weaken erections and ejaculation in men. They can dry up lubrication, cause painful intercourse, or prevent orgasm in women.
• Hormonal changes such as low testosterone levels can take away sexual desire. Men with diabetes are twice as likely to have a low testosterone level as men without diabetes.
• Diabetes-related symptoms, such as fatigue, numbness, or pain, may make sex difficult or less pleasurable.
• The psychological effects of diabetes may stop people’s sexuality. “Such things as feeling unattractive, blaming yourself for diabetes, and depression may damage both sexual desire and function. So can stress over health, money problems, and family issues,” I noted after hearing a talk by sexologist Dr. Mitchell Tepper.
• The effects of medications, especially drugs for high blood pressure and depression, can interfere with sexual function and desire.
• Low blood glucose can also interfere w Continue reading

Insulin: Potential Negative Consequences of Early Routine Use in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin: Potential Negative Consequences of Early Routine Use in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The lack of adequate insulin secretion characterizes all hyperglycemic states. When insulin action is normal, as in type 1 diabetes, there is a near total loss of insulin secretory function. In type 2 diabetes, the abnormalities in insulin secretion are multiple. One of the initial defects is a loss of the early phase of meal-stimulated insulin secretion. This is followed by an inability of the β-cell to increase insulin secretion sufficient to overcome hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive decrease in both β-cell mass and secretory function so that, in most individuals, absolute insulin deficiency occurs in the late stages of the disease.
It would seem logical that the ideal treatment for type 2 diabetes should be early and continuing insulin therapy. Unfortunately, there are several characteristics of insulin treatment and insulin action in type 2 diabetes that limit the usefulness of insulin treatment and that suggest that chronic insulin therapy is best used in the later stages of diabetes when there is an absolute deficiency of insulin.
In normal physiology, β-cell insulin secretion is coupled immediately with changes in the plasma glucose level (1). The secretory response is rapid (within a minute or two), and because the half-life of insulin is ~5 min, there is little lag time in the glucose regulatory system. Endogenously secreted insulin goes via the portal vein to the liver, where 30–80% of it is either metabolized or used (2). The portal vein-to-peripheral arterial insulin ratio is ~2:1. The administrati Continue reading

There’s a Third Type of Diabetes—and Doctors Are Misdiagnosing It as Type 2

There’s a Third Type of Diabetes—and Doctors Are Misdiagnosing It as Type 2

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There are many surprising facts about type 2 diabetes, including the fact that sometimes it’s actually something else. Say hello to a new form of diabetes. It’s called type 3c diabetes and may be commonly mistaken for type 2 diabetes, the form of the disease most closely linked to obesity, a new study suggests.
As a result, many people with type 3c diabetes may not be getting the care they need to keep the eventual consequences of diabetes, such as eye, nerve, and kidney damage, at bay, the researchers warn in Diabetes Care.
Type 3c diabetes follows disease of the pancreas and is also called pancreatogenic diabetes, explains study author Simon de Lusignan, BSc, MB BS, MSc, MD(Res), professor of primary care and clinical informatics, the chair in health care management, and head of the department of clinical and cxperimental medicine at University of Surrey in Guildford, UK. “After pancreas disease, it is possible to develop diabetes. The people who do should be labeled type 3c. This is often not thought about, and they are instead labeled as type 2.”
Some 88 percent of people who had type 3c diabetes in the study were misdiagnosed as having type 2 over a 10-year period. Put another way: Just 3 percent of the people in the study were correctly identified as having type 3c diabetes.
The pancreas is intricately involved in all forms of diabetes. Located behind the lower part of the stomach, this organ is charged with producing insulin, the hormone that helps the body use glucose (blood sugar) in foods for energy. It plays a crucial role in Continue reading

Can You Get Diabetes from Eating Too Much Fruit?

Can You Get Diabetes from Eating Too Much Fruit?

Diabetes is complicated and as such, you should try to avoid getting the disease to the maximum possible extent. In question today, are the otherwise healthy source of nutrients for diabetics, that is fruits. It is surprising that researchers could even question whether eating too much of fruit can be bad for people who suffer from diabetes. However, when you deeply analyze the various causes and factors that could expose you to a greater risk of developing the condition, you will understand the logic behind such a thought process. In this article, we have tried to understand the analyze the same.
So, come and join us for the article “Can You Get Diabetes from Eating Too Much Fruit?”
How Can Eating Too Much Fruit Lead to Diabetes?
The main type of sugar that is present in the fruits we eat is the fructose. The other forms of sugar such as glucose metabolizes in the blood, while fructose does so in the liver. So, when you eat too much of fruit, too much of fructose accumulates in the liver. When the sugar is more than the required quantity, your liver breaks down the same into triglycerides. The increase in the levels of triglycerides, as we know, is one of the many reasons that could expose you to a greater risk of getting diabetes as triglycerides are often stored as fat in different body cells. When you eat too much fruit, you often find it difficult to lose weight, particularly your belly fat. This, as we know, is a major contributor to diabetes, particularly type 2.
Relation Between Eating Too Much Fruit and Type 2 Diabetes
As you know, type 2 diabetes is a complex Continue reading

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