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Preventing Diabetes: Small Changes Have Big Payoff

Preventing Diabetes: Small Changes Have Big Payoff

Preventing Diabetes: Small Changes Have Big Payoff

If it's hard to imagine how small differences in lifestyle can make a big difference in your health, consider this story of identical twins Tim and Paul Daly. They shared almost everything in childhood, including the same eating habits, the same love of basketball and the same genes — some of which predispose them to diabetes.
Back in 1996, one of the twins was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.
"When you first get diagnosed, it's like a punch in the stomach," says Paul Daly, who is now 60.
Or it's a wake-up call — if you're the identical twin. Since the disease runs in families, it seemed almost a certainty that Tim would develop it, too.
"Because we know that Type 2 is genetic disease, and since he has an identical twin, he has a risk that's about 95 percent," says diabetes expert Dr. David Nathan of Massachusetts General Hospital.
But 14 years later, Tim still does not have diabetes. And he doesn't take any medicine to keep his blood sugar down. Instead, he has been able to make small changes to his eating habits and exercise to keep diabetes at bay. He isn't alone — a large national study conducted at 27 sites around the country, including Massachusetts General Hospital, found that small lifestyle changes are far more successful at warding off diabetes than a drug.
Overweight And At Risk
Both Daly brothers had gained weight in middle age. It's just that one gained more than the other. In 1996, when he was diagnosed with diabetes, Paul weighed 220 pounds — too much for his 5-foot-10-inch frame. Looking back, Paul says he hadn't stuck with much regular exercise.
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How to reverse diabetes and lose 93 pounds without hunger

How to reverse diabetes and lose 93 pounds without hunger

What an amazing transformation. Peter struggled for a long time with his weight – he had to give up every possible diet because of always feeling hungry. Instead he got type 2 diabetes, at the age of just 32. And the advice he got just made it worse.
Finally in desperation he searched for other options on google. He found this site and others. Here’s what happened:
The Email
Hello Andreas,
First of all I would like to thank you for all you are doing. The information you and others share were life saving for me.
My name is Peter Szombati and I live in Transylvania, Romania and this is my story. I was a normal-weight child and had normal weight until my early 20s’ (about 185 lbs, 85 kg). Then I started to work at a place were I had to sit a lot and started to ignore homemade food and opted for fast food and soft drinks.
From 185 lbs (85 kg) in my early 20s’, I went to 309 lbs (140 kg) at 25. It didn’t get any better even though I have tried every possible diet. I always lost some weight but put it all back on in the next months because I was always hungry.
Eventually, when I turned 32, my blood results showed I was a type 2 diabetic. I was always tired, was sweating a lot, was always thirsty etc. My doctor gave me a “type 2 diabetic” guide book. I still have it today, even though it is rubbish. The first picture you see when you open the book is that stupid food pyramide.
Anyway, I started to live like the food pyramide says (no more coca cola, but orange juice, whole grain breads, low-fat stuff) and my diabetes got worse, I got fatter and more tired than I was Continue reading

WellDoc partners with American Diabetes Educators Association to add more educational content

WellDoc partners with American Diabetes Educators Association to add more educational content

WellDoc announced today a partnership with the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), a professional membership organization of over 14,000 diabetes educators. WellDoc will incorporate educational content from AADE into its FDA-cleared, reimburseable BlueStar system for diabetes management.
"We were able to build a curriculum that will be able to be delivered in a contextually guided way for our users built off the AADE materials," WellDoc Chief Marketing Officer Tara Charvat told MobiHealthNews. "It’s a beautiful add-on and it’s really a great way for patients to get a more guided curriculum to help them with the self-management of their condition about and beyond the realtime feedback and the other coaching methods that we’ve built on that platform."
WellDoc's BlueStar analyzes patient data, compares the data to past trends, and sends analytics to the patient’s healthcare team. The program is supported by motivational messages, behavioral coaching, and educational content, delivered right to the patient's mobile device. BlueStar is known for being the first reimbursable digital therapeutic.
Through the partnership, BlueStar users will have information delivered to them based on AADE's seven primary areas of self-management: Healthy Eating, Being Active, Monitoring, Taking Medication, Problem Solving, Reducing Risks and Healthy Coping. Educational materials will be re-worked for a digital format, with "bite-sized" lessons being delivered to patients at the moments when they'll have the most impact.
“Digital health is a strong complement to in-person c Continue reading

Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise: Can A Short, Daily Workout Make a Difference?

Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise: Can A Short, Daily Workout Make a Difference?

The scientifically-proven 7-minute workout has been shown to have impressive benefits but can it be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes?
Thinking about trying the popular 7-minute workout? This series of high-intensity exercises performed in succession with short periods of rest in between has been shown to produce impressive benefits when performed 6 days per week. These benefits include reduced body mass index (BMI), improved oxygen uptake, smaller hip and waist circumference and improved sensitivity to insulin. 1
The workout includes 9 to 12 exercises that use the body’s big muscles at a high-intensity pace. Exercises are done at the rate of 15 to 20 repetitions per 30-second interval, with a rest period of fewer than 15 seconds between exercises to maximize metabolic impact. Below, personal trainer Katie Teasdale (who also has type 1 diabetes) demonstrates how to complete each exercise within the 7-minute workout whilst maintaining proper form and technique:
Research has shown that even a very short workout can achieve a reduction in waist circumference and can be a “great solution for people to get started and plan on continuing exercising.”2
All of which sounds great but what about people with type 2 diabetes?
While physical exercise is vital in the prevention and management of diabetes3, the intensity of the workout may initially prove daunting for some. What's more, people with type 2 diabetes may need longer resistance and additional aerobic training than can be achieved from a 7-minute session, says Nicholas Beltz, PhD, assistant professor of sports phys Continue reading

A Sedentary Lifestyle and Diabetes

A Sedentary Lifestyle and Diabetes

What happens when you are sedentary and don't get a good daily dose of physical activity? You raise your risk of obesity and developing type 2 diabetes. Once you have type 2 diabetes, you are at increased risk for heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye complications, and foot and skin problems.
The World Health Organization says a sedentary lifestyle is one of the 10 leading causes of death and disability.
It accounts for 300,000 premature deaths each year in the United States alone. These deaths are mainly from cardiovascular disease -- something for which people with diabetes and prediabetes are at a much higher risk than others.
Overview
One way to maintain a healthy weight or to lose weight is through exercise. The CDC and the American College of Sports Medicine recommend that people engage in moderate to intense physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day, at least five days a week. Yet less than half of Americans get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to a CDC survey. Even worse? A whopping 25% get no physical activity at all.
Kids aren’t faring well, either. Increased time spent with television, computers, video games, cell phones and homework means less time moving around and playing outside. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, since 1976, the number of overweight children in the United States has tripled.
In practical terms, this means that today more than 1 in 6 children between the ages of 12 to 19 are overweight and at risk for health problems.
The Role of Exercise
Keeping one’s weight in proportion to height i Continue reading

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