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Predictors Of Chronic Kidney Disease In Type 1 Diabetes

Predictors of Chronic Kidney Disease In Type 1 Diabetes

Predictors of Chronic Kidney Disease In Type 1 Diabetes

CKD risk not necessarily tied to albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes.
The International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas estimated that by 2040 approximately 642 million people worldwide will be afflicted with diabetes. The incidence of type 1 diabetes, especially in children, continues to grow at a rate of 3% annually worldwide. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 7-12% of all diabetes cases globally.
One of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes is related to kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease is the major precipitating factor to end-stage renal disease and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events, which remains the leading cause of death in patients with type 1 diabetes.
Retaining renal function in the diabetes patient population is a major goal for healthcare practitioners and regular evaluations of kidney function helps mitigate the risk of disease progression and gives practitioners the opportunity to intervene early. Increases in urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) is an early indicator of renal damage and may promote progression to macroalbuminuria and eventual decrease in glomerular filtration rate. However, recent studies have shown that a significant number of patients with type 1 diabetes are progressing to end-stage renal disease in the absence of albuminuria.
Researchers retrospectively analyzed over 2,600 patients with type 1 diabetes and normal renal function at baseline to evaluate predictors for the development of depressed renal function with or without albuminuria, or its single components, Continue reading

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Type 2 diabetes is a reversible condition

Type 2 diabetes is a reversible condition

A body of research putting people with Type 2 diabetes on a low calorie diet has confirmed the underlying causes of the condition and established that it is reversible.
Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University, UK has spent almost four decades studying the condition and will present an overview of his findings at the European Association For The Study Of Diabetes (EASD 2017) in Lisbon.
In the talk he will be highlighting how his research has revealed that for people with Type 2 diabetes:
Excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver
As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose
Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail
Losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start the normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2 diabetes
This reversal of diabetes remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the condition
“I think the real importance of this work is for the patients themselves,” Professor Taylor says. “Many have described to me how embarking on the low calorie diet has been the only option to prevent what they thought – or had been told – was an inevitable decline into further medication and further ill health because of their diabetes. By studying the underlying mechanisms we have been able to demonstrate the simplicity of type 2 diabetes.”
Get rid of the fat and reverse Type 2 diabetes
The body of research by Professor Roy Taylor now confirms his Twin Cycle Hypothesis – that Type 2 diabetes is caused by excess fat actual Continue reading

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease in Partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease in Partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company

“St. Luke’s University Health Network is proud to continue our mission of improving patient education and care by collaborating with Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly on this important initiative to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to learn more about their heart disease risk,” said Dr. Bankim Bhatt, St. Luke’s Chief of Endocrinology. “By providing relevant, educational resources about the connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease to our community, we hope to empower people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to speak with their healthcare providers and to take action.”
For Your SweetHeart launched in November 2016 following a survey that found more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, like heart attack, stroke or even death. Due to the complications associated with diabetes, such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure and obesity, cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, is a major complication and the leading cause of death associated with diabetes. Ten leading patient and professional advocacy organizations and a steering committee of eight leading medical experts (cardiologists, endocrinologists and primary care physicians) have also joined the For Your SweetHeart movement to further educate their communities about the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease.
St. Luke’s University Health Network – a non-profit, regional, fully integrated, nationally recognized network providing services at seven Continue reading

Incidence and Risk Factors of Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for the Emergency Department

Incidence and Risk Factors of Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for the Emergency Department

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most common endocrine diseases in children. A chronic autoimmune disease, about 65,000 children worldwide develop T1D each year. (1) It accounts for about 5% of all diabetes cases. There is no known way to prevent it, and the only effective treatment requires frequent blood glucose monitoring and the use of insulin to stay alive. (2)
The incidence of T1D in the United States, Europe, and Australia has been increasing for the last four decades. According to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the incidence among European children aged one to five years old is increasing at 5.4% annually—much higher than other age groups. Similar trends are reported in the United States. At the current rate, the number of T1D cases will double during this decade. (3) (Interestingly, allergic reactions, food allergies, and other autoimmune diseases are also on the rise.)
There are two striking trends connected to the T1D epidemic:
1. The disease is occurring much earlier in life.
2. The disease is striking in people previously considered to be at low or moderate genetic risk.
TID is caused by a combination of genetic and unknown environmental factors. Identifying the specific triggers is part of current research—what is causing these immunoregulation defects? The answer isn’t yet known, but the drastic increase worldwide rules out genetics alone as the cause.
Research has focused on several hypotheses regarding T1D epidemiology. Investigators have considered infection, early childhood diet, vitamin D, environmental pollutants, increased height v Continue reading

The Connection Between Insulin Resistance and the High-Carb, Low-Fat Diet

The Connection Between Insulin Resistance and the High-Carb, Low-Fat Diet

Dr. Tim Noakes, a well-respected scientist, researcher, physician and professor at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, is one of the world’s foremost experts on low-carb diets
Legal action was taken to strip him of his medical license for promoting the low-carb diet. It’s the first time in history that a diet has been put before a legal jury to decide whether or not it’s correct
A low-carb, high-fat diet is crucial for preventing or reversing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; treating type 2 diabetes with insulin is one of the worst mistakes you can make
By Dr. Mercola
Dr. Tim Noakes, a well-respected scientist, researcher, physician and professor at the Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, is one of the world's foremost experts on low-carb diets. In fact, he was instrumental in getting the low-carb diet revolution off the ground.
He's also an accomplished athlete. As a long-distance endurance runner with 70 marathons under his belt, he had long promoted high-carb diets, himself consuming 400 grams of carbs a day or more when preparing for a race. Eventually, he discovered this wasn't the best way to improve athletic endurance and health, and ended up writing a number of popular books on low-carb diets.
From High to Low Carb
Noakes graduated from medical school in 1974. At the time, he was also running, and this was when the high carbohydrate diet really started to become popularized. Following the advice of one of his professors at the cardiology unit where he worked, he changed to a high-carb die Continue reading

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