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Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Last year my cholesterol shot up despite living nowhere near a decent barbeque joint. I was totally stressed. I wasn't overweight. But I was pretty sedentary. My doctor prescribed a high dose of Lipitor, a powerful statin.
For women of a certain age, statins are supposedly the best thing since Lycra for keeping wayward bodies in check. Statins interfere with the synthesis of low-density lipoprotein, the "bad" cholesterol. LDL is a prime suspect in heart disease, the top killer of women.
The statin cut my cholesterol like buttah.
But statins can also increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, muscle and/or liver damage. Heart trouble and diabetes run in my family. Was I trading a heart attack for diabetes?
"We give statins to people with diabetes," was all my doc said.
That didn't answer my question. I knew from an unrelated test that I did not currently have coronary artery disease, so I decided to investigate the statin situation.
In 2012 the Food and Drug Administration slapped a black box warning on statins, saying that they could raise blood glucose levels in people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes. That meant an increase of anywhere from 9 to 27 percent in relative risk – in absolute terms about 0.3 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people who are treated for a year with high-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 50 percent or more) and 0.1 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people treated with moderate-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 30 to 50 percent.)
Because doctors disagree on who should get statins, in 2013 the American Colleg Continue reading

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How to Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How to Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report finds that a staggering 30 million people—roughly 1 in 10 Americans—have type 2 diabetes. Most concerning: nearly a quarter of them don’t even realize it.
Just as worrisome is the prevalence of prediabetes: The new report reveals that 84 million adults, or roughly one-third of the U.S. population, have the elevated blood sugar levels that put them at high risk for developing full-blown diabetes.
"We’re not seeing the rate of diabetes and prediabetes growth continue to escalate in the way it has in previous years," says Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. "Still the numbers of cases of undiagnosed prediabetes, in particular, are astounding. It’s evidence that more needs to be done to reach those at risk for type 2 diabetes.”
Type 2 diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the leading cause of disability. It is more common, though less severe, than type 1 diabetes. In both cases, the body doesn't produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels properly, which can lead to serious medical issues such as heart and kidney disease.
Here are some ways to reduce your risk of developing diabetes—and if you already have it, to prevent it from progressing.
Know Your Risk
A fundamental step in prevention, says Albright, is paying close attention and understanding your risk factors, including being 45 or older, overweight, and physically inactive; having a family history of diabetes or conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or poly Continue reading

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

News you can use about diabetes
Living with diabetes is about so much more than well, diabetes. It's about the ups, like small daily accomplishments and achieving your goals, and the downs. It can be complicated, but it may help to keep in mind that you can find inspiration, information, and motivation here. In these featured articles, you'll discover ideas to take the pressure off and help you deal with everything from making travel easier to making dining out more enjoyable. Since stress can really take its toll on your blood sugar, you can read how to tackle that, too.
More articles are added each month. So browse them all, get inspired, and check back in with us often. If you'd like, you can sign up for more TeamingUp to get regular updates. Continue reading

Treat your diabetes naturally with CoQ10

Treat your diabetes naturally with CoQ10

(NaturalNews) Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is the most common cause of injury and death in people with diabetes. Preliminary studies suggest, however, that this debilitating condition may be treatable by boosting your body's levels of a substance that it is already producing: Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10.
Approximately 50 percent of all type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients - nearly 2 percent of the world's population - experience some form of diabetic neuropathy. There are currently no treatments that are capable of preventing the disorder or halting its progression.
But in a recent study published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease, researchers from the University of Miami found that supplementation with CoQ10 was able to decrease neuropathy-induced pain in diabetic mice.
The researchers induced diabetes in 56 obese mice and left another 20 mice unharmed to serve as a control group. They then supplemented the diets of the diabetic mice with CoQ10 and observed both behavioral and physiological markers of pain, as well as biological markers of CoQ10 activity. The researchers found that while CoQ10 had no influence on the diabetes itself, it reduced pain and inflammation in the mice, actually preventing the development of diabetic neuropathic pain.
"Dorsal root ganglia, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord tissues from diabetic mice demonstrated increased lipid peroxidation that was reduced by CoQ10 treatment," the researchers wrote. "CoQ10 administration was also noted to reduce the pro-inflammatory factors in the peripheral and central nervous system."
The diabetic mice also lost we Continue reading

How to Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How to Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Expert Reviewed
In the past 30 years, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes has skyrocketed to such an extent that it is now viewed as an epidemic in the western world. From being a once fairly mild and rare ailment of the elderly to becoming a chronic disease, this type of diabetes affects people of every age, race, and background, and is now a major modern cause of premature death in many countries around the world. Someone dies from Type 2 Diabetes every 10 seconds worldwide.[1] Happily, there is a great way to prevent Type 2 Diabetes: establish and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Continue reading

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