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Pharmaceutical Giant Novo Nordisk To Invest £115m In A New UK Drug Research Centre In Post-Brexit 'vote Of Confidence'

Pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk to invest £115m in a new UK drug research centre in post-Brexit 'vote of confidence'

Pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk to invest £115m in a new UK drug research centre in post-Brexit 'vote of confidence'

Danish pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk is to invest about £115m over 10 years in a new research centre in Oxford, in a move described by the government as a “vote of confidence” in post-Brexit Britain.
About 100 scientists will work at the centre, investigating new approaches to treating type-2 diabetes.
David Gauke, chief secretary to the Treasury, said that the move was a “vote of confidence in the UK’s position as a world leader in science and research,” according to the BBC.
Novo Nordisk’s executive vice-president and chief science officer Mads Thomsen said Britain’s vote to leave the EU was “unfortunate” but should not affect the collaboration between Oxford and the company.
“Obviously we think the Brexit decision was unfortunate. That being said, Oxford University has been around for 800 years so the academic excellence and our company's ability to turn that into medicines hasn't really changed,” Mr Thomsen told the BBC.
John Bell, a medicine professor at Oxford, said the new set-up, which will allow for daily interactions between academic and industrial scientists, underlined the importance of sharing research and cutting-edge science across sectors.
The UK’s decision to leave the EU has raised concerns in the science sector over a potential gap in funding and sparked concerns amongst drugmakers over future regulation.
The European Medicines Agency, a body based in London and responsible for the scientific evaluation and safety monitoring of medicines, warned it is likely to leave after Brexit.
Mr Thomsen told the BBC: “We are very happy Continue reading

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Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet for Diabetes Type 2

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet for Diabetes Type 2

Ketogenic diet has taken us by the wind in the recent years. There are numerous resources available online for people who are considering going on one.
A ketogenic diet, in very simple terms, is a very low-carb diet. It has been claimed that going on a ketogenic diet is beneficial for people seeking to lose weight and to improve their health. This probably sounds very charming to a person with diabetes who is looking to lose excess weight and to improve their overall general health to avoid or prevent any diabetes related complications.
But, is it really worth all the hype it has generated?
For someone who has diabetes, a healthy and nutritional lifestyle is extremely important. Though lowering the consumption of carbs from your diet can aid you, is it actually recommended to restrict yourself to a very low carb diet if you have diabetes?
We can’t claim to know but we reached out to respected experts who have shared their thoughts on the diet and whether they recommend it to their patients.
Read on to find out whether or not you could benefit from going on a Ketogenic diet.
1. Gina Keatley, CDN
I would not recommend the ketogenic diet to any patients other than those suffering with epilepsy. The proper ratio of fat to protein to carbohydrate calories (80-15-5) is extremely difficult to maintain over any period of time. In many research studies over half of the participants drop out of studies before they have completed due to this difficulty and in other studies the researchers do not get institutional approval for such a strict limit of carbohydrates and use one with far Continue reading

Metformin: Can a Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer?

Metformin: Can a Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer?

In 1957, the first results from a clinical trial of the diabetes drug metformin in patients were published. Yet, it would take nearly 40 years for the drug to be approved in the United States as a treatment for type 2 diabetes.
Now researchers want to know whether this decades-old drug may have additional uses in another disease—cancer. Based on findings from a number of large epidemiologic studies and extensive laboratory research, metformin is being tested in clinical trials not only as a treatment for cancer, but as a way to prevent it in people at increased risk, including cancer survivors who have a higher risk of a second primary cancer.
Numerous early-stage clinical trials are currently under way to investigate metformin’s potential to prevent an array of cancers, including colorectal, prostate, endometrial, and breast cancer. Several of these trials are being funded by NCI’s Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials. And NCI is collaborating with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to study participants from the landmark clinical trial, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), to investigate metformin’s impact on cancer incidence.
Some of the early-phase prevention trials of metformin are enrolling participants who are at increased risk for cancer and who are obese, have elevated glucose or insulin levels, or have other conditions that put them at risk for diabetes.
“With the obesity epidemic, these studies are applicable to a substantial portion of the U.S. population and, increasingly, of the world population,” Continue reading

Diabetes Drug That Also Treats Obesity Could Make Billions

Diabetes Drug That Also Treats Obesity Could Make Billions

Being fat sucks. I’m not judging; I’ve been overweight all my life. Obesity puts you at risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and even some cancers.
Then of course there’s Type 2 diabetes. The mother of all obesity-related complications keeps your body from regulating the sugar it needs as fuel, and can lead to all kinds of health issues, like kidney damage, heart disease, and even limb amputation.
That could change, if pharmaceutical companies can convince doctors that a new-ish class of drugs can attack Type II diabetes and the fatness that begets it—without killing patients. Earlier this month, at the Endocrine Society’s annual conference in Boston, Danish pharma Novo Nordisk presented three years of data showing that their diabetes drug liraglutide helped obese and prediabetic patients lose weight without undue risk. Which is big, for a drug that’s been flagged for causing cancer.
In rats, that is. Liraglutide—or Saxenda, as it’s known commercially for weight-loss—carries a black box warning from the FDA for giving thyroid tumors to rodents. However, the specific tumor-causing cell biology is different enough in rats that many endocrinologists don’t consider it a significant risk to human patients.
Many, but not all. Weight loss drugs are historically pretty risky. Remember Fen-Phen? It was great at helping people get skinny—as long as those people were OK with developing chronic heart problems. Fen-Phen was pulled from the market in 1997, and its maker had to pay billions of dollars in legal fees.
Liraglutide, in Saxenda form, might Continue reading

Price controls on diabetes drugs, licenses for sales reps key features of pharmaceutical bill

Price controls on diabetes drugs, licenses for sales reps key features of pharmaceutical bill

Price controls on diabetes medication. Requiring pharmaceutical sales representatives to be licensed and annually report to the state on their activities. Mandating disclosure of any pharmaceutical-related contributions by nonprofits working in the health care sector.
These are just some of the changes proposed by Democratic Sen. Yvanna Cancela in an omnibus pharmaceutical bill introduced on Tuesday — changes she says are necessary in order to ensure patients have access to life-saving drugs and to bolster health care industry transparency. But pharmaceutical company lobbyists are already digging in their heels and saying it will reduce patients’ access to life-saving medicine and ignores the importance of private market competition.
A substantial portion of the bill, SB265, seeks to improve access to medically necessary diabetes drugs by implementing price controls, which pharmaceutical companies have long resisted. The legislation, which eight of Cancela’s Democratic colleagues have signed onto, would require the state Department of Health and Human Services to compile a list of “essential” drugs that treat diabetes, such as insulin and biguanides, and require drug manufacturers to reimburse purchasers — either the patient or the insurance company — when the manufacturer’s list price of the drug exceeds the highest price paid for the drug in certain countries or if it exceeds annual changes in the Consumer Price Index.
The goal, in Cancela’s view, is essentially to stabilize the cost of a drugs such as insulin that have existed for 95 years and yet have Continue reading

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