diabetestalk.net

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

People With Diabetes Can Eat Eggs

Many people with diabetes are concerned about eating eggs because they believe they are too high in cholesterol. It was once believed that eating dietary cholesterol could increase cholesterol in the blood, but this logic is no longer thought to be true. In fact, studies have shown that dietary cholesterol, like the cholesterol found in eggs, is not linked to high levels of cholesterol in the blood.
Dietary Cholesterol Not Linked to High Blood Cholesterol
While it is not uncommon for a person with type 2 diabetes to have other conditions like high cholesterol, dietary cholesterol consumption itself has not been linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels.
As for an overall relationship between egg consumption and type 2 diabetes, a June 2010 study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no such relationship. Some experts recommend limiting eggs to no more than three yolks per week. This recommendation is mainly due to the saturated fat content found in the yolk rather than the cholesterol.
It's the Added Saturated That Will Get You
Excess intake of saturated fat (found in fried foods, process meats like sausage and bacon and sweets such as cookies, cake, and candy) can raise your blood cholesterol. And while two eggs have less saturated fat than a small hamburger, if you cook your eggs in butter, top them with full fat cheese or pair them with bacon or sausage, you are bound to eat too much saturated.
In fact, some study results have shown a link between egg intake and high cholesterol or diabetes may be skewed based on the presence of other high-fat breakfast Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
9 Diabetes-Friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

9 Diabetes-Friendly Grocery Shopping Tips

Walking into a grocery store unprepared can be a challenge for anyone. Throw type 2 diabetes into the mix, and shopping for food can be downright overwhelming. But by following some simple tips, you can master your grocery shopping and learn how to stock your fridge with foods for a healthy diabetes diet.
Your first tip? In general, you want to focus on fresh foods in their original form — fruits, vegetables, fish, and lean protein. “I recommend that people with diabetes eat foods with the shortest lists of ingredients possible,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, an endocrinologist at Mount Sinai St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City.
Next, use these nine strategies to get the most nutrients for your money every time you go grocery shopping.
Map out your week’s menu in advance. “A must-do before you head to the grocery store is to plan your menu for the week,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. “After you plan what you’ll make, take inventory of what you have in stock and write out your grocery list.” She suggests designating one day a week to do your planning and shopping. “Planning ahead makes it less stressful and much easier to follow a healthy eating plan,” she explains.
Don’t shop on an empty stomach. It’s not just an old wives’ tale. “When we’re hungry, we tend to crave the most calorically dense foods as a survival mechanism,” Dr. Dodell says. “And if a person with type 2 diabetes has low blood sugar, he or sh Continue reading

Perioperative Diabetes mellitus management

Perioperative Diabetes mellitus management

1. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS SPEAKER Dr. DHARMRAJ SINGH MODERATOR Dr. SHASHI PRAKASH
2. INTRODUCTION  Patients with diabetes have higher incidence of morbidity and mortality.  Poor peri-operative glycaemic control increases the risk of adverse outcomes.  Treatment of post-operative hyperglycaemia reduces the risk of adverse outcomes.
3. CRITERIA FOR DIAGNOSIS OF DIABETES 1. Symtoms of diabetes plus random plasma glucose level >200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) 2. Hemoglobin A1C ≥ 6.5 % 3. Fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) 4. Two-hour plasma glucose level ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) American Diabetes Association
4. METABOLIC SYNDROME At least three of the following  Fasting plasma glucose ≥ 110 mg/dl  Abdominal obesity (waist girth > 40 [in men], 35 [in women])  Serum triglycerides ≥ 150mg/dl  Serum HDL cholesterol < 40 mg/dl (men), <50 (women)  BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg  Insulin-resistant syndrome is a constellation of clinical & biochemical characteristics frequently seen in pt with or at risk of type 2 diabetes.
5. THE METABOLIC RESPONSE TO SURGERY AND THE EFFECT OF DIABETES Metabolic effects of starvation: 1. Period of starvation induces a catabolic state. 2. It will stimulate secretion of counter-regulatory hormones . 3. It can be attenuated in patients with diabetes by infusion of insulin and glucose (approximately 180g/day). Metabolic effects of major surgery. It causes neuroendocrine stress response with release of counter- regulatory hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, cortisol and growth hormone) and of Continue reading

Glycemic Load: The Key to a Smarter Diabetes Diet

Glycemic Load: The Key to a Smarter Diabetes Diet

Once you’ve mastered counting carbs, just a little more math will let you fine-tune your diabetes diet plan. Figuring out the glycemic load of a food can help you craft a menu that won’t put your blood sugar on a roller coaster.
Understanding Glycemic Index vs. Glycemic Load
Beyond carbohydrate counting, you might already be looking at the glycemic index (GI) number, which tells you how quickly your blood sugar might spike after eating a certain type of food. The GI of carb-based foods is a measurement of how quickly blood sugar rises after eating in comparison to a slice of white bread, which has a GI of 100. In general, the lower the GI number, the less dramatically the food will affect blood sugar. Low-GI foods are generally 55 or less.
However, calculating the glycemic load (GL) can provide an even more accurate picture of what that food will do to your blood sugar. “Glycemic load accounts for carbohydrates in food and how much each gram of it will raise your blood sugar level,” says Krista Wennerstrom, RD, food and nutrition services director at Thorek Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
To find a food’s GL, multiply its GI by the number of carbohydrate grams in a serving, and then divide by 100. A low GL is between 1 and 10; a moderate GL is 11 to 19; and a high GL is 20 or higher. For those with diabetes, you want your diet to have GL values as low as possible.
As an example, an average cake-type doughnut has a GI of 76 and 23 carbohydrate grams. Multiply 76 by 23 and then divide by 100, and you get 17.48, which is close to the top of the moderate range for glyce Continue reading

Diabetes Skin Care – What You Need to Know and What You Can Do

Diabetes Skin Care – What You Need to Know and What You Can Do

Taking care of our skin is always important, but in diabetes skin care requires more consideration. The skin, our body’s largest organ, is a vital physical barrier between the outside world and everything inside us. Although it seems like a pretty simple thing, there are many blood vessels, nerves and various other structures within it. These all affect the integrity of our skin, and influences how well it does its job.
It’s in Your Blood
One primary cause of medical complications in diabetes is high blood glucose levels, especially if levels are consistently high over a prolonged period of time. High levels of circulating glucose can lead to damage to the body’s blood vessels. Since all organs in the body rely on blood perfusion from these vessels, any damage to them can lead to problems for the respective organs.
People with diabetes may thus be at risk of various complications if their blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled. These may include eye problems (such as retinopathy), kidney damage (nephropathy) and, of course, skin issues. The cells of our skin need good blood flow to maintain its integrity.
Other factors, like high blood pressure and high cholesterol, may also increase the risk of blood vessel damage. For people with diabetes, it’s important for blood pressure and cholesterol to also be monitored regularly. If you have concerns about these, you should talk to your doctor about appropriate monitoring and management.
Nerves Know the Problems
Nerves in the skin detect things like heat and pain to let us know when there are problems or danger Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Skimmed Milk: Study Finds People Who Eat More Full-Fat Dairy Less Likely to Develop Diabetes

    As people raised on two-percent milk or on the downright heavenly whole kind know, skim is little more than water mixed with a splash of milk extract. (If you grew up drinking skim, anything richer might taste gross to you. Sorry for your misfortune.) But then there are the legions of dieters who reluctantly choke down skim because it saves them 40 calories per cup compared to good, old two-percen ...

  • Pasta: To Eat, or Not to Eat?

    One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing ...

  • GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert

    GPs need to tell people they can get rid of type 2 diabetes through weight loss – nutrition expert September 14, 2017 8.54am EDT Every working day, GPs in the UK diagnose almost 1,000 people with type 2 diabetes. It is one of the commonest and most expensive diseases. What most people don’t know is that with a bit of hard work, it is possible to become non-diabetic again. Formerly limited to o ...

  • Can an online game really improve blood sugar control for people with diabetes?

    Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling When it comes to serious health problems, you might think a game would be unlikely to help. But a recent study of people with diabetes could change your mind. Researchers publishing in the September 2017 issue of Diabetes Care describe a study in which people with diabetes joined a competitive online game aimed at educating participants about ways to improve bloo ...

  • 31 Healthy Ways People With Diabetes Can Enjoy Carbs

    Photo by cookieandkate.com Whether you've just been diagnosed with diabetes or you've been managing it like a pro for years, chances are you always need new recipes to add to your repertoire. Or maybe you have a family member/friend/date who has diabetes, and want to cook dinner for them. Fear not. You don't have to cook special, "diabetic" meals. Or, despite popular myths, obsessively avoid carbs ...

  • Antibiotic abuse is on track to kill more people than cancer and diabetes. Can food help?

    England’s Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies recently made headlines around the world when she again warned of an impending “post-antibiotic apocalypse.” Sounding no less disastrous, the World Health Organization has said that we’re “heading towards a post-antibiotic era, in which many common infections will no longer have a cure and [will] once again kill unabated.” How have we a ...

  • More People Need To Know That Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed, Say Experts

    Not enough people know that Type 2 diabetes may be reversed through weight loss, experts have suggested. Researchers from the University of Glasgow and University of Newcastle said both patients and doctors may not realise the condition can be reversed and called for greater awareness of ‘diabetes remission’. “If diabetes patients are able to lose a large amount of weight they will return to ...

  • 2 Things People With Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn From The Cancer & AIDS Community

    2 Things People With Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn From The Cancer & AIDS Community Cancer is scary. Diabetes is scary. Chronic illness in general is scary. But each condition holds a different social connotation which is why Cancer & AIDS receive more funding, research, and general support from the government and the media than diabetes. Diabetes is such a large, yet largely ignored, problem that ...

  • Can people with diabetes still run?

    If you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes and don't know where to start, don't discount running as a great way to manage your health and fitness. Its a little known fact that four million people in the UK currently have diabetes; more than all types of cancer and dementia combined. While people with the condition can lead a perfectly normal life, if not managed properly it can lead to ser ...

Related Articles