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People Who Drink 3 To 4 Times Per Week Less Likely To Develop Diabetes Than Those Who Never Drink: Study

People who drink 3 to 4 times per week less likely to develop diabetes than those who never drink: study

People who drink 3 to 4 times per week less likely to develop diabetes than those who never drink: study

Frequent alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes in both men and women, according to a new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes), with alcohol consumption over 3-4 week days giving the lowest risks of diabetes.
Previous studies have consistently suggested that light to moderate alcohol consumption - in terms of amount consumed - is associated with a lower risk of diabetes compared with abstention in men and women, whilst heavy consumption is associated with a risk greater than or equal to that of abstainers. However previous studies examining the role of drinking patterns (number of days drinking per week rather than volume) in relation to diabetes risk have given inconsistent findings, and studies on the effects of particular types of beverage are likewise inconclusive.
The present study, by Professor Janne Tolstrup and colleagues from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark, examined the effects of drinking frequency on diabetes risk, and also considered association with specific beverage types.
The study used data from the Danish Health Examination Survey (DAHNES) from 2007-2008, in which Danish citizens aged 18 and over completed a self-reporting questionnaire including items on lifestyle and health. Those who already had diagnosed diabetes were excluded, as were women who were pregnant or had recently given birth (likely to result in a change in drinking habits). The study comprised 70,551 DAHNES participants who had given details of alcohol con Continue reading

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Israeli researchers discover shrub that can treat diabetes

Israeli researchers discover shrub that can treat diabetes

Israeli researchers have found that a plant that grows in Israel, as well as in other parts of the Middle East, is effective in treating diabetes.
Dr. Jonathan Gorelick of the Judea Research and Development Center will present the results of his study of Chiliadenus iphionoides (sharp varthemia), an aromatic shrub that grows in Israel and throughout the Middle East, at the 25th Judea and Samaria Research Studies Conference in Ariel University on Thursday.
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Dr. Gorelick and his team, who published the results of their study of sharp varthemia in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology in October 2011, found that consumption of the yellow-flowering plant increased sugar absorption in skeletal muscle and fat cells and reduced blood sugar levels in animals.
According to Dr. Gorelick, while many plants have traditionally been used to treat diabetes, only few have been successful as marketable medications. His research team is working on isolating the active ingredient in sharp varthemia so that it may be made into an accessible treatment for diabetes patients.
The Judea Research and Development Center, which is located on Moshav Carmel in the Hebron Hills regional council in the West Bank, focuses on stimulating industrial research and development of products, technologies, patents and inventions for commercial applications. It is sponsored academically by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Continue reading

Top 15 Super Foods To Curb Diabetes

Top 15 Super Foods To Curb Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder that can bring on other ailments. It can affect the entire system as well as every other organ in the body including the heart, eyes, kidney and more. It is necessary for diabetic people to know how they can control their ailment. It has been seen that, if one pays close attention to the diet that one follows, it can make a big difference in controlling the ailment and other complications that can arise from it. The main factor which leads to the onset of type 2 diabetes is mainly a poor diet being followed and a sedentary lifestyle.
Top 15 Super Foods To Help Curb Diabetes
1. Beans
Beans contain many vital minerals and dietary fibers that make them ideal for those suffering from diabetes. As diabetic people need to feel full for longer periods of time, such fiber rich food is good for such people.
Different kinds of beans to choose from:
• Kidney
• Navy
• White
• Pinto
• Lima
• Soy
• Black
Benefits
• Beans are a good source of dietary fiber
• They are rich in magnesium, potassium and protein
Beans can be eaten in different ways. They can be had in the cooked form as well as in salads or in the boiled form in soups.
2. Green And Leafy Vegetables
It is known that green and leafy vegetables contain many useful nutrients that make them ideal for the diet of a diabetic person.
Benefits
• Such vegetables are low in calories and easy carbohydrates
• There is insoluble fiber as well as calcium, magnesium and vitamin C
• Such vegetable lower the risk of type 2 diabetes
It is recommended that one consumes two or three servings per day o Continue reading

Indigenous great-grandmother reverses type 2 diabetes and loses 45kg with exercise, healthy eating

Indigenous great-grandmother reverses type 2 diabetes and loses 45kg with exercise, healthy eating

When Ngarrindjeri great-grandmother Maxine Risk-Sumner was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, she began a journey that saw her lose 45 kilograms and turn her life around.
Ms Risk-Sumner told 891 ABC Adelaide's Mornings program she learned she was sick after being hospitalised with a "mystery" illness.
"The doctor soon discovered my blood sugar was high and he said to me, 'did you know you were diabetic?'," she said.
Ms Risk-Sumner was referred to her GP who confirmed she had type 2 diabetes.
When she asked her doctor how she could get rid of it, he replied, "your people find it very hard".
"When somebody categorises me and diagnoses me not as a patient but as an Aboriginal — because I am black — that makes me more determined to override what [was] said," Ms Risk-Sumner said.
Her doctor prescribed medication and referred her to a diabetic educator and nutritionist.
"I thought, 'how can these people help me? All of my family has type 2 diabetes'," she said.
Over the next 12 months, Ms Risk-Sumner learnt how she could change her lifestyle to better her health.
She described the experience as "absolutely amazing".
Ms Risk-Sumner said at the time of her diagnosis she was obese.
"I reckon I wore size 20 clothes," she said.
"Now I wear [size] nine kid's jeans."
With the help of her diabetes educator, Ms Risk-Sumner changed her whole perception of food and what she had been eating.
Aggressive approaches to intensive lifestyle and dietary change, and the right medical care and education, can really make a difference.
"Food is just as addictive as alcohol and drugs," she sai Continue reading

Drinking with Diabetes: Dangers and Guidelines

Drinking with Diabetes: Dangers and Guidelines

As we all know, diabetes involves following a careful diet plan, and that might mean having to cut back on some of your favorite indulgences.
Wine and other alcoholic beverages are just a few of the treats that diabetics should enjoy sparingly – something that is often overlooked during a Q&A with the doctor.
Dangers of Drinking Alcohol with Diabetes
Because the body processes alcohol in the same way it processes fats, drinking can cause your blood sugar to rise. However, excess alcohol can actually have the reverse effect, causing your blood sugar to drop to dangerously low levels. Additionally, some insulin or other medications can be negatively affected by alcohol.
But don’t throw out the bottles just yet; if you are very careful with your alcohol intake, you should be OK having a drink on a special occasion.
Alcohol Consumption Guidelines for Diabetics
Medical professionals encourage diabetics to follow these consumption guidelines:
Do not drink more than two alcoholic beverages within 24 hours. (One alcoholic drink = 5-ounce glass of wine, 1.5-ounce "shot" of liquor or 12-ounce beer).
If you are following a calorie-controlled meal plan, one drink of alcohol should be counted as two fat exchanges.
Drink alcohol only with food.
Drink slowly.
Avoid "sugary" mixed drinks, sweet wines and cordials.
Mix liquor with water or diet soft drinks.
Most of us enjoy a drink every now and then, and your diabetes shouldn’t deprive you – so long as you handle your alcohol intake carefully and responsibly.
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its al Continue reading

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