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Overlooked Cheap And Healthy Foods

Overlooked Cheap and Healthy Foods

Overlooked Cheap and Healthy Foods

A proper diet is one of the major ways to manage diabetes and healthy foods often get a bad reputation for being expensive. With some planning, there are plenty of diabetes-friendly options that can fit into your budget. Consider these cheaper healthy food options that are often overlooked for people with diabetes.
Preparing for the Grocery Store
The first step to a better eating plan is to prepare for the grocery store before you get there. Determine your budget and make a list of what you need. Check your cabinets and only fill in things you do not already have. Stick to the list to avoid being lured into buying unnecessary extras. Coupons can help you save money on quality foods. Find them in local publications, magazines, and online. Read the circulars for the local grocery stores to find the best deals. Join shoppers clubs at grocery stores and mass merchants to score additional discounts. Never shop when you feel hungry as this may cause you to splurge. Learn the store layout. Often the healthiest options are located on the outside aisles or perimeter of the store. Avoid visiting the aisles filled with packaged cakes, cookies, and other processed temptations. Inquire if the store has discount days you might be able to take advantage of, such as deals for seniors or veterans. Check in the front of the store since they often place “two for one product” at the entrance. If the store has a delivery service, you can shop online and have exactly what you need to be delivered to your door. This minimizes the chances of being tempted by advertisements at the store. It is Continue reading

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Diabetes cholesterol risk warning

Diabetes cholesterol risk warning

The majority of people with diabetes are not controlling cholesterol levels effectively - putting them at increased risk of heart disease, a charity warns.
Diabetes UK says 90% of people with the disease are having annual checks which will show up problems.
But it says the most recent national diabetes audit found many are not then addressing high cholesterol.
Chief executive Barbara Young said it meant the health of thousands was being put at unnecessary risk.
'Easy to control'
About 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes. The majority - about 90% - have Type 2 diabetes, where the body makes too little insulin or where it fails to make it properly. In those with Type 1 diabetes, the body cannot produce any insulin at all.
The audit includes data on 1.9 million people in England with diabetes.
It is an issue that is putting the health of hundreds of thousands of people at risk. Barbara Young, Diabetes UK
People with both types of the condition have a higher risk of heart disease than the rest of the population.
Cardiovascular disease is linked to 44% of deaths in people with Type 1 and 52% with Type 2.
Diabetes UK says that because of the existence of statins - cholesterol-lowering drugs - it is relatively easy to control high cholesterol.
People with Type 2 diabetes also have twice the risk of stroke within the first five years of diagnosis compared with the general population.
Barbara Young said the findings were worrying, adding: "It is not clear why the high number of people having their annual cholesterol check is not translating into better cholesterol control, bu Continue reading

Type 1 diabetes as common in adults as children, but many adults misdiagnosed

Type 1 diabetes as common in adults as children, but many adults misdiagnosed

Type 1 diabetes is not predominantly a 'disease of childhood' as previously believed, but is similarly prevalent in adults, new research published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology shows.
Research by the University of Exeter Medical School using UK Biobank found that adults are as likely to develop type 1 diabetes as children, with more than 40 per cent of type 1 diabetes cases occurring after the age of 30.
But many of those with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30 are thought to have type 2 diabetes at first, and not initially treated with insulin to control blood sugar levels. Previous published research by the University of Exeter Medical school found that, on average, it took a year for those with type 1 diabetes who had been misdiagnosed with type 2 to be put on insulin (1).
Among the adults with type 1 diabetes to have been misdiagnosed is Theresa May, the Prime Minister, who was initially told by doctors she had type 2 diabetes and given tablets which did not control her blood sugar.
Distinguishing between type 1 or type 2 diabetes matters as it affects the treatment needed. In type 1 diabetes immune cells destroy the body's insulin producing beta cells and people need to be injected insulin to control blood sugar levels. With Type 2 diabetes there is still insulin produced so it can be treated initially with diet and tablet therapy.
Type 1 diabetes has been typically viewed as a disease of childhood and adolescence as it accounts for more than 85 per cent of diabetes in under 20s. (2)
But type 1 cases are harder to recognise and correctly diagnose in adults be Continue reading

'It puts holes in the retina': Thousands at risk of blindness due to diabetes-linked eye disease

'It puts holes in the retina': Thousands at risk of blindness due to diabetes-linked eye disease

STEPHEN DUFFY WAS out shopping with his mother one Friday in May 2010 when the vision in his left eye became blurry.
“I said to her, ‘Where are you?’ That’s when I noticed it first.”
He went to the doctor, who said that he probably had an eye infection, and gave him antibiotics. But the problem was still there by Monday, so he went back to the doctor.
“He shone a torch in my eye and said that there was blood on the back of my eye and sent me to the Eye and Ear Hospital on Adelaide Road,” he told TheJournal.ie.
He was diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease that can be caused from diabetes type 1 or 2. The blood vessels behind his eye had burst, and the eye surgeon would have to weld them back together.
By Friday, a week after he first noticed a problem, he was going under laser eye surgery to try and save his sight at the age of 30. He was petrified.
“People absolutely take their eyesight for granted until there’s a problem. It gave me a new appreciation for people who have to deal with it.”
After months of monitoring his condition, Stephen then had to go under surgery again in December as his sight was still deteriorating and he wanted to save what was left of it.
Now he can see at four feet what someone with perfect eyesight can see at 24 feet.
“That’s something that needs to be put more out into the public domain – there are so many problems caused by diabetes – kidneys, heart, and lungs. Sight problems were something that I didn’t know a lot about – but it actually puts holes in the retina.”
According to Fighting Blindness, Continue reading

Drug that lowers blood sugar to combat type 2 diabetes ‘also helps fight obesity and heart disease’

Drug that lowers blood sugar to combat type 2 diabetes ‘also helps fight obesity and heart disease’

A DRUG used to treat diabetes has been hailed a game changer after experts found it not only slashes blood sugar levels but can also protect against heart and kidney disease.
The drug, taken once a day, lowers blood pressure and combats obesity, one of the main causes of type 2 diabetes, a new study shows.
Canagliflozin, sold under trade name Invokana, reduces the overall risk of heart disease by 14 per cent and slashed the risk of hospitalisation for heart failure by 33 per cent.
And researchers from The George Institute for Global Health, found it also had a "significant impact" on the progression of kidney disease.
Professor Bruce Neal described the findings as "exciting", adding they offer real hope to people with type 2 diabetes.
He said: "Coronary heart disease is the biggest killer by far for people with type 2 diabetes.
"Our findings suggest that not only does canagliflozin significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, it also has many other benefits too.
"We found it also reduced blood pressure and led to weight loss.
"Type 2 diabetes is growing rapidly all over the world and we need drugs that not only deal with glucose levels, but that also protect the many millions of people from the very real risks of stroke and heart attack."
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Invokana is known as a SGLT2 inhibitor and is a relatively new drug, that works to block the body's reabsorption of sugar or glucose.
It is already available to patients in the UK, prescribed by doctors to help manage type 2 diabetes.
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) stated in 2014 canagliflozin Continue reading

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