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Our Diabetes Story: My 11 Year Old Son Went Into Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Was Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Our Diabetes Story: My 11 Year old Son Went Into Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Was Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

Our Diabetes Story: My 11 Year old Son Went Into Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Was Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

We had a really scary time this week — my 11-year-old son ended up in the Pediatric ICU at the local children’s hospital for two days due to Diabetic Ketoacidosis and we found out he has Type 1 Diabetes. I’m sharing our story because I missed obvious signs. Maybe another parent or caregiver might miss signs too. Maybe this will save a kid from going into Diabetic Ketoacidosis. While Type 1 Diabetes is not curable; maybe if I had put things together, we could have prevented a 2 day stay in the Pediatric Intensive Care unit. Our Diabetes Story: My 11 Year old Son Went Into Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Has Type 1 Diabetes
According to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: “Knowing the warning signs for type 1 diabetes could help save a life! Type 1 diabetes can often go undiagnosed in its early stages because the symptoms can be mistaken for more common illnesses, like the flu. Take notice if you or your loved one experiences the following:
Extreme thirst
Frequent urination
Drowsiness and lethargy
Sugar in urine
Sudden vision changes
Increased appetite
Sudden weight loss
Fruity, sweet, or wine-like odor on breath
Heavy, labored breathing
Stupor or unconsciousness
Call your doctor immediately if one or more of these symptoms occurs in you or your loved one. It is extremely important to receive medical attention—misdiagnosis or leaving your condition untreated can have tragic consequences, including death.”
This is how we wound up at the hospital:
Last Friday night B vomited (food) late at night. I didn’t think anything of it because he had eaten ice cream with h Continue reading

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Arthritis on a Diabetes Blog

Arthritis on a Diabetes Blog

When it comes to living with both Type 1 diabetes and arthritis, I don’t experience the amount of pain and disability that burdens some of my favorite people in the DOC. Rick Phillips who deals with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis shared his story on my blog a couple of years ago. Rick tirelessly advocates for people with diabetes, but he often admits that arthritis negatively impacts his life much more than diabetes. Molly Schreiber has had Type 1 diabetes for 28 years. Her rheumatoid arthritis is a formidable opponent and she deals with the worst that RA can dish out. In general I am doing okay when it comes to living with arthritis. Except when I’m not….
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I am good at diabetes.
I am bad at arthritis.
I have had a tough summer. Although I was diagnosed diagnosed with inflammatory spondyloarthropathy over 10 years ago, my problems are peripheral. My hands hurt and my thumb joints are shot. In May I woke up with horrible heel and foot pain which continues to get worse despite following doctor’s orders.
I don’t write about arthritis very often because I am a diabetes blogger. Type 1 diabetes is a constant in my life and I do little without taking diabetes into account. After 40+ years of T1, I have no major D-complications. At the same time diabetes is a “needy condition” that requires constant affirmation and is entrenched in my psyche. More than once I have mentioned that I deal with other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in addition to diabetes. I once wrote about a skin problem called annulare granuloma and mentioned that I fe Continue reading

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I recently switched from using syringes to inject insulin to using an insulin pen, and it seems like I need to inject more insulin with the pen to counter the same blood glucose level. The length of the needle seems to be the same, the pen is primed, and yet the pen injection has less of a blood-glucose-lowering effect. What could be going on here?
A. The insulin contained in vials and pens is identical. So if you’re using your pen correctly, there should be no change in the effectiveness of the insulin on your blood glucose levels. It’s not unusual for people to be educated on how to use an insulin pen and to believe they are injecting with proper technique but to make one or more minor mistakes that affect the amount of insulin being injected. I recommend that you make an appointment with your diabetes educator or health-care provider and have that person observe you injecting a dose of insulin to see what, if anything, might be going wrong.
Here are a few examples of common errors that can occur when administering insulin with a pen:
A person may dial in the correct dose, put the needle into the skin correctly, but instead of pushing the button at the end of the pen to inject the insulin, dial the dose back to zero. This would result in no insulin being injected. Once the dose is dialed, the button has to be pushed in all the way — you should hear a series of clicks as you push — and then the pen must be held against the skin, needle inserted, for 6–10 seconds.
Some people know that they need to push the button to deliver the insulin, but they don’t push i Continue reading

Diabetes mellitus cured - George's experience

Diabetes mellitus cured - George's experience

7 Long Wheat Mash Diet Regimen (LWMDR)
7.3 Duration required for diabetes cure
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Diabetes is considered a syndrome rather than a disease by modern medicine. It remains a companion to the grave - once diabetic always diabetic is the order of the day. Due to different reasons the Beta cells of Pancreas get impaired and adversely affects the quality or quantity or both of Insulin being produced in the body - partially in case of Type 2 & totally in case of Type 1 Diabetes. Due to the insufficiency or inefficiency of insulin produced by pancreas, blood sugar levels go up degrading strength & health of human body by starving all cells. Damaging vulnerable organs like Kidney & Heart makes diabetes fatal; whereas impairment of Retina of eye, cerebral haemorrhage/stroke, gangrene of foot/lower-leg etc make rest of life miserable.
Diabetes is seen to be progressive, degenerative & incurable. This is because the cause (impairment of pancreas) is never treated; only its effect (blood sugar increase) is looked into and taken care of.
The author hence left the beaten track when he was diagnosed diabetic & took a drastically different approach i Continue reading

Long-Acting Insulins Useful Tools in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Long-Acting Insulins Useful Tools in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers have augmented insulin's effectiveness with several rapid and long-acting analogues and new delivery systems such as insulin pens and insulin pumps. Biosynthetic preparations with various pharmacokinetic profiles somewhat mimic the steady insulin release from a normal pancreas. Long-acting insulins create unprecedented prescribing flexibility, as prescribers can tailor patients' regimens to their individual activity levels, eating habits, and responses to insulin.
Insulin is a necessity for patients who have type 1 diabetes (T1D). For many people who have type 2 diabetes (T2D), insulin can improve glycemic control significantly. Still, many clinicians are reluctant to initiate injectable glucose-lowering therapies in T2D. They often perceive, rationally or irrationally, that patients will have difficulty understanding complex regimens. Many clinicians also report that they are less proficient than they would like with insulin, creating discomfort with diabetes management.1 And they perceive that multidose insulin regimens may be associated with increased episodes of hypoglycemia, though they are not.2 However, today's long-acting insulins such as insulin detemir, insulin glargine (IGlar), and insulin degludec (IDeg) offer convenience that increases adherence significantly (Table 13-7). They also tend to have fewer adverse effects, which can simplify patients' regimens and improve control.3-7
Designing a Regimen
For most patients, designing an optimal insulin regimen is a continuing process that may require formulation changes, dose-related fine tuning, and intro Continue reading

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