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Osteoporosis And Diabetes: Pros And Cons To Antidiabetic Regimens

Osteoporosis and Diabetes: Pros and Cons to Antidiabetic Regimens

Osteoporosis and Diabetes: Pros and Cons to Antidiabetic Regimens


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Osteoporosis and Diabetes: Pros and Cons to Antidiabetic Regimens
Study aims to distinguish different antidiabetic drugs and their effect on osteoporosis in people with diabetes.
Osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes have recently been the focus of study in recent years. Osteoporosis is a bone condition defined by low bone mass, increased fragility, decreased bone quality, and an increased fracture risk. Research has shown that people with tyope 2 diabetes are at risk for developing osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence of fractures increases with age and therefore osteoporosis is most likely seen in individuals 50 years or older. The increase in fractures poses an increased mortality rate among patients with osteoporosis. This mortality rate is increased when people with type 2 diabetes develop osteoporosis.
There are many risk factors of osteoporosis and bone fractures. According to the World Health Organization, individuals with low bone mass and increased fragility are most susceptible to fractures and osteoporosis. The Nord-Trondelag Health Survey from Norway showed a dramatic increase in hip fractures among type 1 females. As such, the longer an individual is diagnosed with diabetes, the lower his or her bone mineral density (BMD) becomes. In addition, it has been reported that women with type 1 diabetes are more prone to developing fractures and ultimately osteoporosis when compared to females without diabetes. It is suggested that insulin plays a role in diabet Continue reading

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How to Manage Work Stress If You Have Diabetes | Everyday Health

How to Manage Work Stress If You Have Diabetes | Everyday Health


Positive coping strategies for high-stress work situations are crucial for people with diabetes, as stress can cause dangerous blood sugar swings.
When Sheryl Hill goes into work at the St. Louis Park, Minnesota,nonprofit where she is a co-founder and theexecutive director, she attends countless meetings, sifts through a sea of paperwork, and plows into a seemingly bottomless inbox. But with prediabetes, Hill, 61, also makes sure she carves out time to de-stress so her blood sugar stays under control.
Im a strong advocate for meditation over medication just one letter is the difference in being healthier, Hill says.
Research suggests Hill is right to prioritize stress management at work, especially because she has prediabetes. A study published in September 2014 in Psychosomatic Medicine found that work-related stress and job strain are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes in men and women. In the observational research, which involved about 5,340 healthy working participants, those people who reported high job strain had a 45 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who reported low strain after a follow-up period of about 13 years.
The way we perceive stress also matters. A study published in September 2012 in Health Psychology found that people who said they believed stress negatively affected their health and also experienced high levels of stress had a greater risk of early death than people who experienced high levels of stress without this belief.
For people with diabetes, managing the physical and psychological reaction to stress is cru Continue reading

Is Diabetes Causing My GERD?

Is Diabetes Causing My GERD?


Because gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD is related to both neuropathy or nerve damage and obesity, people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing this condition. Learn more.
GERD often accompanies both type 1 and type 2 diabetes as it is related to both neuropathy and obesity.
While many people experience occasional heartburn or mild acid reflux, when these symptoms occur at least twice a week or interfere with everyday life, you may be diagnosed with Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
GERD causes symptoms or injury to the esophagus by frequent acid reflux—the backwash of stomach acid and bile salts that flood the esophagus.
“It’s primarily due to the dysfunction of the muscles and nerves that control normal esophageal functions and normal gastric emptying,” says James C. Reynolds, MD, AGAF, FACP, FACG , a gastroenterologist, and professor of medicine at Penn Medicine. “But the good news is that GERD is treatable and can be cured.”
Because GERD is related to both neuropathy or nerve damage and obesity, people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing acid reflux disease. According to one 2013 study, “the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in diabetes could be as high as 41%.”
“For people with type 1, the mechanism is entirely related to nerve damage caused by years of inadequate glycemic control,” says Dr. Reynolds. “Type 1 has clearly shown to be a risk factor for developing problems in the gastrointestinal tract, including constipation, diarrhea, gastroparesis and GERD, all of which can be improved Continue reading

White Rice, Brown Rice, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women

White Rice, Brown Rice, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women


White Rice, Brown Rice, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women
Dr. Qi Sun , MD, ScD, Dr. Donna Spiegelman , ScD, Dr. Rob M. van Dam , PhD, Dr. Michelle D. Holmes , MD, DrPH, Ms. Vasanti S. Malik , MSc, Dr. Walter C. Willett , MD, DrPH, and Dr. Frank B. Hu , MD, PhD
Departments of Nutrition (Ms. Malik and Drs. Sun, van Dam, Willett, and Hu), Epidemiology (Ms. Malik and Drs. Spiegelman, van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), and Biostatistics (Dr. Spiegelman.), Harvard School of Public Health; the Channing Laboratory (Drs. van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School; all at Boston, MA 02115
Corresponding author: Qi Sun, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115. Tel: 617 432 7490 Fax: 617 432 2435, [email protected]
The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Arch Intern Med
This article has been corrected. See the correction in volume 170 onpage1479.
See other articles in PMC that cite the published article.
Because of a different degree of processing and nutrient contents, brown rice and white rice may have different effects on risk of type 2 diabetes.
To prospectively examine white rice and brown rice consumptions in relation to type 2 diabetes risk in US men and women aged 2687 yr.
The Health Professionals Follow-up Study (19862006) and the Nurses Health Study I (19842006) and II (19912005).
We prospectively ascertained diet, lifestyle practices, and disease status among 39,765 men and 157,463 women in t Continue reading

13 Hikers with Diabetes Take On the North Coast Trail

13 Hikers with Diabetes Take On the North Coast Trail

Every endurance athlete has someone they think about to help push through tough times. Here is a story about one child who's face appears when everything is going wrong...
The first time it hit me that people do not understand life with type 1 diabetes was when I had to tell a mother that her newly diagnosed son has this disease for the rest of his life.
Being younger at the time, I had settled into my relatively new condition that many confuse for one of poor diet and lack of exercise. People hear “mumble, mumble, diabetes,” and scrunch their face trying to put the pieces together how this seemingly fit guy has a disease associated with overweight and elderly individuals.
The reason it feels like putting a key in the wrong hole is because I did nothing wrong to get this condition – it happens by fate. What a lottery to win.
A nurse walks in while I am speaking to the diabetes doctor and asks if I would like to meet a child who was diagnosed moments ago. My smile and general optimistic view on life makes me a nice spokesperson to say, “Welcome to the club.”
There was a certain anticapatory silence in the room. Doctors must get used to this.
What I was told before heading into the room was the child had been brought in for something completely unrelated. You walk in for one thing and come out with a chronic condition, bummer.
Looking at the eyelids of the mom fighting off tears like the levee on a river, I tell her, “Do not worry, we can achieve anything.” She stares back, wanting a cure to the common cold, and asks, “So how do I have to treat this until it g Continue reading

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