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One Drop Partners With Fitbit To Bring Diabetes Management Data Insights To Users Worldwide

One Drop Partners with Fitbit to Bring Diabetes Management Data Insights to Users Worldwide

One Drop Partners with Fitbit to Bring Diabetes Management Data Insights to Users Worldwide


One Drop Partners with Fitbit to Bring Diabetes Management Data Insights to Users Worldwide
One Drop users gain 24/7 access to Fitbit data in combination with One Drop health data to drive more comprehensive care management experience
One Drop to develop custom app for Fitbit Ionic providing diabetes-related health data on wrist for users of both Android and iOS devices
NEW YORK, Oct. 31, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- One Drop, a leading digital diabetes care and self-management platform, today announced a multi-part collaboration with Fitbit (NYSE: FIT ) that will use the power of Fitbit wearable data to bring enhanced data-driven care management tools to the diabetes community. The first initiative will be to integrate enhanced access to Fitbit data into the One Drop | Mobile app for diabetes management, providing One Drop users with at-a-glance access to Fitbit data, with the goal of helping users better understand the impact of physical activity on blood glucose management. Fitbit data will also be incorporated into One Drop reports, allowing physicians and One Drop | Experts, and One Drop | Professional users to utilize this data to make more personalized, informed care decisions.
One Drop | Experts is the only digital diabetes education program accredited by the American Diabetes Association (PRNewsfoto/One Drop)
One Drop wireless blood glucose monitoring system with unlimited test strips (PRNewsfoto/One Drop)
Starting in November, One Drop users will be able to sync Fitbit intraday data to their One Drop accounts. This will allow users of the free, cloud-based diabete Continue reading

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Saturated Fat for Diabetes

Saturated Fat for Diabetes


January 19, 2017 by David Mendosa
Did you think that saturated fat isnt good for your health? Actually it is both healthy and satisfying.
A new study by Norwegian researchers that The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published at the end of November 2016 debunks the urban myth that you need to minimize how much saturated fat you eat. The researchers at the University of Bergen found strikingly similar health effects of diets based either on carbohydrates or on fats.
In their randomized controlled trial, 38 men with abdominal obesity followed diets that were high in either carbohydrates or fat, of which about half was saturated. The men in the study had normal fasting glucose.
Only the abstract of the study is online, but the corresponding author, Simon N. Dankel, Ph.D., sent me a copy of the full text. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Science at the University of Bergen.
I would especially like to draw your attention to the rigorous design of our study, Dr. Dankel said in an email. We matched the food types as well as energy (within normal range), protein, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, making for a more clear-cut comparison of carbs vs. fat.
The very high intake of total and saturated fat did not increase the calculated risk of cardiovascular diseases, said Ottar K. Nygrd, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Clinical Science at the University of Bergan and cardiologist, in a press release from the university . He was a coauthor on the study.
Participants on the very high-fat diet also had substantial improveme Continue reading

The FreeStyle Libre, a device for monitoring blood sugar, is a pleasure to use.

The FreeStyle Libre, a device for monitoring blood sugar, is a pleasure to use.


Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by FreeStyle Libre.
In the years after I was diagnosed at 24 with Type 1 diabetes, I would sometimes cry when I stopped to study my hands. Back then, the skin of my fingertips was pockmarked by tiny craters, traces of the blood tests I performed seven or more times a day. Though they would heal in time, others would immediately take their place. Merely knowing they were there was dispiriting, a reminder that my disease would always leave its mark on my body in one way or another.
Successfully managing Type 1 diabetes requires almost relentless biomedical self-surveillance . You learn to count carbs, measure insulin doses, and track your glucose levels. Its the last of those thats the most frustrating for many who live with the disease, as the process has traditionally involved pricking your finger with a lancing device and then checking the capillary blood that springs forth. Typically, the process isnt that painful, but it can be messy, and the disposable single-use test strips it requires are often expensive, sometimes costing more than $1 each without insurance. (That may not sound like much, but it adds up if youre using them the recommended 48 times a day.) Perhaps more importantly, the information it reveals is limited, showing you where you stand in the moment but telling you nothing about whether your levels are rising, falling, or holding steady. That can be frustrating when you need it most, since it makes it hard to detect potentially dangerous rapid changes.
More recently, continuous glucose monitors (or CGMs) have begun t Continue reading

Vegetables in a Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, or Sauted Best?

Vegetables in a Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, or Sauted Best?


Vegetables in a Diabetes Diet: Is Steamed, Roasted, or Sauted Best?
Help prevent blood sugar spikes and get the most nutritional bang for your buck with this guide.
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When you're managing diabetes, there are pros and cons involved with each way of cooking veggies.
We all know vegetables are good for us, but when you have diabetes, it can be difficult to know whether certain types are better for your blood sugar, and how preparing a veggie may impact its nutritional value. For example, are roasted sweet potatoes as nutritious as steamed kale, or if you saut your spinach rather than steam it, have you lost some essential nutrients?
While all vegetables are healthy, it might be difficult to understand why some have to be limited or reduced, says Cara Lowenthal, MPH, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston.
Why Veggies Should Be in Your Diabetes Diet
Vegetables are an essential part of every diet, but this food group is especially important for people with type 2 diabetes . Nonstarchy vegetables, like spinach, kale, and broccoli, are rich in nutrients like vitamin A and vitamin E, low on the glycemic index , and have lots of fiber, which means munching on them will help you fill up without significantly raising your blood sugar, Lowenthal says.
The fiber that many vegetables pack can also slow down how quickly sugar enters the blood, explains Krista Mathews, a dietitian Continue reading

Patient registry pilot eases diabetes prevention in practice

Patient registry pilot eases diabetes prevention in practice


Patient registry pilot eases diabetes prevention in practice
A pilot patient registry is helping physicians and other clinicians use their electronic health records system to more easily identify patients at risk for type 2 diabetes and refer them to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program (DPP). The pilot aims to bring together all members of the health care team to ensure complete access to detailed patient information for prevention of diabetes.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 84 million Americans live with prediabetes. And in Michigan alone, 2.6 million have prediabetesa number that Henry Ford Macomb Hospital is looking to decrease through the pilot program.
Henry Ford Macomb Hospital, located in Clinton Township, Michigan, is part of the Henry Ford Health System and is evaluating the patient registry for its effectiveness in screening, testing and referring patients to a DPP in partnership with the AMA. The registry pilot went live March 15 and is accompanied by a year-long DPP. Patients referred to a DPP can learn about eating healthfully, adding physical activity to their daily routine, managing stress, and staying motivated and overcoming barriers to success.
With a staggering number of Americans living with prediabetes and the vast majority unaware they have the condition, we must continue to ensure more patients have access to, and enroll in, proven lifestyle change programs that have been shown to cut in half participants risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes, AMA President David O. Barbe, MD, MHA, said in a st Continue reading

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