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Obstructive Sleep Apnea And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?


Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?
1Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
2Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Edited by: Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Reviewed by: Vsevolod Polotsky, Johns Hopkins University, USA; Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA
*Correspondence: Sushmita Pamidi, Respiratory Division, McGill University Health Centre, Room L4.05, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A1A1. e-mail: [email protected]
This article was submitted to Frontiers in Sleep and Chronobiology, a specialty of Frontiers in Neurology.
Received 2012 Jun 16; Accepted 2012 Jul 24.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic illness that is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. Major factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes include obesity and poor lifestyle habits (e.g., excess dietary intake and limited physical activity). Despite the proven efficacy of lifestyle interventions and the use of multiple pharmacological agents, the economic and public health burden of type 2 diabetes remains substantial. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder that is pervasi Continue reading

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Are These Popular Diets Good for Diabetes?

Are These Popular Diets Good for Diabetes?

While many fad diets spell trouble for someone with type 2 diabetes, other popular diets can help you eat well for diabetes. Learn about the Paleo diet, Mediterranean diet, and more.
Popular diets can come and go like fashion trends, but eating right to manage type 2 diabetes is a lifelong commitment. While some fad diets may be unhealthy for you, other popular diets have been proven to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce the need for diabetes medications or the risk for complications like heart disease.
Choosing a Healthy Diet for Diabetes
Whether you’re looking for a diet to meet a short-term goal like weight loss or a long-term one like managing your type 2 diabetes without drugs, it takes some research to find the diabetes diet that’s best for you.
Angela Ginn, RD, LDN, CDE, nutrition education coordinator at the University of Maryland Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Baltimore and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says the first step is to take an honest look at yourself.
“It’s about finding food or an eating plan that fits your lifestyle and you can stick to for six months or more,” Ginn says. “If you can only follow the diet for a few weeks or so, it’s probably not the right option for you.”
Another warning sign that you may not be following the right diet for type 2 diabetes, Ginn says, is if the diet eliminates or severely restricts an entire food group, like carbohydrates. “You should have a wide variety of food options,” she says. Those options should include whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-f Continue reading

Diabetes, Bones - Diabetes Self-Management

Diabetes, Bones - Diabetes Self-Management


Osteoporosis is the most common type of bone disorder, affecting an estimated 10 million Americans. It is a chronic condition characterized by reduced bone strength, low bone mass, and a higher risk of bone fracture, especially at the hip, spine, and wrist. If you are over the age of 50, there is a 55% chance that you are at increased risk for osteoporosis or have it already. The risk of osteoporosis increases with age; it is not, however, limited to older individuals.
Osteoporosis can be prevented or slowed down, but once damage to the bone has taken place, it can be difficult to reverse. Bone fractures are the main consequence of osteoporosis, and they are associated with lasting disability after they occur, especially hip fractures in older people.
For reasons that are still unclear, people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes experience a higher incidence of bone fracture than the general population, even though people with Type 2 diabetes tend to have above-average bone density. It is especially important, then, for people with diabetes to know about osteoporosis, to have their risk of fracture evaluated by medical professionals, and to find out what they can do to make their bones as strong and healthy as possible.
One way health-care providers evaluate a persons risk of osteoporosis is to do a bone mineral density (BMD) test. The most common test uses x-ray beams, is painless, and can be done in a matter of minutes.
BMD is a core indicator of bone strength. A test for BMD measures the amount of a mineral, usually calcium, in a bone. This measurement is then com Continue reading

Day One of Life with Diabetes: Memories from Diagnosis Day

Day One of Life with Diabetes: Memories from Diagnosis Day


Day One of Life with Diabetes: Memories from Diagnosis Day
Day One of Life with Diabetes: Memories from Diagnosis Day
Since September of 1986, when I was seven, I have been living with type 1 diabetes. Day one of diabetes is mostly a blur for me, but I remember that my mom picked me up from soccer practice early, as my pediatrician had called and said there was an elevated amount of sugar in my urine. We were told to pack a bag. My parents mumbled the words diabetes to one another and they both cried, and I had no idea what was going on, but knew it had to be serious if Dad was crying, too. I was sent off to spend 12 nights at Rhode Island Hospital, where I practiced injecting insulin into an orange before learning to push needles through my own skin that same day. I alsoremember feeling the heave and shift of my lifes foundation on that day, as I made room for diabetes.I think everyone in my family felt that shift.
And that feeling isnt unique to my family alone. I talked with several folks in the diabetes community parents of kids with diabetes and adults who were recalling their own diagnosis and that moment of shift was banked in the memory of many. Parents remember the moment that diabetes came crashing in, and how they adjusted to this new version of normal.
The moment indelibly etched in my memory bank is our beloved pediatrician telling my nine year old daughter that she had diabetes. My daughter looked up at Dr. Mindy and said, Does that mean Im gong to DIE? To which her doctor replied No, it means youre going to have to LIVE differently, said Renee Holtzin Continue reading

Timing Luck And A Bit Of Diabetes

Timing Luck And A Bit Of Diabetes

According to the doctor, I’m “completely normal now”. Well, at least my cholesterol and triglycerides are. The other good news is that at least one of the measures of diabetes has crossed back into what she called pre-diabetes levels and what I call post-diabetes levels. She liked the rewording. Timing is important. I suspect the timing of my previous visit was important because we caught something when it was easier to change. I’ve seen a lot of fortuitous timing lately, much of it for my friends. It’s a reminder that hard work and due diligence are important, but timing and luck help, too. The frequent question is, do they help enough.
My diabetes diagnosis caused a major freakout moment. So much for eating right and exercising regularly – except that for the last few years, and particularly this last winter, proper diet and exercise dropped off the schedule in an effort to make enough money to pay all of my bills. Some nice timing and a bit of luck brought a surge of work and opportunities, and money. A frugal diet heavily loaded with rice, pasta, and potatoes; plus few free hours and dismal weather; plus heightened stress probably combined to pop my blood sugar numbers into the eye-popping range. The visit to the doctor came after the surge, and after the surge came more free time. Unfortunately, the extra free time came from opportunities falling through – but with very nice compliments and rejections. It is nice to see that diet and exercise can be powerful. Now, it’s time to emphasize meditation, again. While my timing and response may have been good, Continue reading

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