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No, There Is No ‘miracle Recipe’ That Cures Diabetes

No, there is no ‘miracle recipe’ that cures diabetes

No, there is no ‘miracle recipe’ that cures diabetes

“Dr Jaime Dy-Liacco has finally found a remedy for diabetes […] He created a mixture containing the minerals required to fight against diabetes. The ingredients: 12 pieces of sweet pepper, 2 raw eggs, ½ teaspoon of sea salt,” an online Senegalese newspaper recently reported.
“Dice and crush the peppers in order to combine them with the eggs. Then add ½ a teaspoon of sea salt. Lo and behold, your remedy is ready and you can drink it,” the publication added. It was relaying an article published by protegetasante.net, a news site which claims to provide natural methods for curing oneself.
Is it possible to be cured of diabetes using such a recipe? We checked.
What proof is there?
We found a video on YouTube in which Dy-Liacco talks about his recipe that “cures diabetes in five minutes”, but were unable to find his contact details to request proof of this claim.
Africa Check also tried in vain to get in touch with the department of health of the Philippines. However, its website does not contain any information about Dy-Liacco or his anti-diabetes recipe.
He also has not published anything in a scientific journal, Dr Gojka Roglic from the World Health Organisation’s department for management of noncommunicable diseases, disability, violence and injury prevention, told Africa Check.
“I couldn’t find any trace of a scientific evaluation of this ‘miraculous’ solution for curing diabetes,” Roglic said.
“There’s nothing more to say. No trace of any scientific proof.”
‘Be careful of fortune tellers’
Director of the Mark Sankalé Diabetes Centre i Continue reading

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Mike Huckabee and the diabetes cure he endorsed that 'no health agency supports'

Mike Huckabee and the diabetes cure he endorsed that 'no health agency supports'

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is distancing himself from the unusual ways he earned money before announcing his White House run May 5, but journalists aren’t letting the former Arkansas governor off the hook.
Huckabee, who shed about 100 pounds after being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, filmed TV and radio infomercials advertising a program to "reverse" diabetes in February and March. Huckabee also lent his email list to carry ads about a looming food shortage and a cancer cure found in the Bible.
CBS’ Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer tried to pin Huckabee down on his business dealings during a May 10 interview that followed a critical column about "Huckabee’s Hucksterism" by National Journal’s Ron Fournier.
Huckabee got testy as he explained the program he endorsed is more about healthy eating than dietary supplements.
A bit later, Schieffer moved on to Fournier during a pundit panel discussion for a response.
"As you know, there was more to that, and I really like the way you kind of put him on his heels and he had to filibuster you," Fournier said. "He -- his endorsing -- the infomercials that are endorsing cures and treatments that no health agency supports. He's linking cancer to cures to the Bible verse."
In other words, he said, not very presidential behavior.
PunditFact wanted to dig into Fournier’s claim about Huckabee’s past. Did he shill for a shoddy diabetes "cure" that "no health agency supports"?
‘Diabetes Solution Kit’
Fournier’s column references a March New York Times story about Huckabee’s "highly unconventional inc Continue reading

No, Alcohol Will Not Prevent or Cure Your Diabetes

No, Alcohol Will Not Prevent or Cure Your Diabetes

Pictured: Not a cure for diabetes. Unsplash/Jez Timms
Pictured: Not a cure for diabetes. Unsplash/Jez Timms
We all want certain things to be true. We long for them, deep in our hearts. Some of these are innocuous: it would be pretty great if eating chocolate made us lose weight. Some are a bit more problematic, like the wish that putting supplements into our bodies makes us magically ‘better’ than everyone else.
Some are just silly, like the idea that drinking alcohol is good for your health.
We love being told that things that everyone knows are bad for you are actually good. Every second week, someone comes up with a new story extolling the health benefits of eating chocolate. If you Google the words “study finds,” you’ll inevitably find at least one recent article telling you that, despite obvious medical improbabilities, setting your skin on fire might actually be the treatment that you’ve been looking for all this time.
Nowhere is this more true than in the case of moderate drinking.
What happens when a large observational study looking at a socially-determined issue finds something that disagrees with lots of research that came before?
Well, firstly, the scientific community collectively turns its nose up and says “correlation doesn’t equal causation.” A bunch of professors happily high-five, or clink test-tubes, or whatever else professors do, and go back to their fairly insular work. There are notable exceptions, but most scientists just don’t have time to write articles about stuff like this.
Meanwhile, the media goes crazy.
Seriously crazy.
Continue reading

Diabetes and Skin Problems

Diabetes and Skin Problems

Diabetes can affect all body systems, but often the connection between diabetes and skin problems is missed. Up to one third of people with diabetes will experience skin problems related to the disease. If caught early, most conditions can be treated and resolved. Skin problems should be addressed and promptly treated to avoid serious consequences and complications.
Here is a summary of common skin problems that occur more frequently in people with diabetes, along with some skin problems that are specifically related to the disease.
If you have diabetes, and skin problems are a concern, the best way to prevent problems is to keep your diabetes in good control, keep blood sugar within recommended levels and practice good skin care.
General Skin Problems that Often Occur in People with Diabetes
Bacterial infections produce painful and swollen, inflamed skin that is often hot to the touch. These infections can usually be treated with antibiotics and improve with good blood sugar control. Bacteria can thrive in the presence of excess glucose. Examples of bacterial infections are boils, eyelid styes, carbuncles, nail infections and hair follicle infections. Staphylococcus is a common bacterium responsible for bacterial infections in people with diabetes.
Fungal infections produce itchy rashes in moist areas of the body, such as skin folds. These rashes can be red, surrounded by scales or blisters and have a yeasty white film in the folds of the skin.
Prescription medicines and good diabetes control help in treatment. As with bacterial infections, excess glucose is beneficial to Continue reading

Eat more healthy fat to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

Eat more healthy fat to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

Eating more unsaturated fats instead of carbohydrates decreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says research published in PLOS Medicine.
Replacing carbohydrate and saturated fats with healthy fats, such as polyunsaturated fats, lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin control, according to findings from a new meta-analysis.
Around the world, there has been a sharp increase in the rates of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 29.1 million people have diabetes. That is approximately 9.3 percent of the population.
To treat existing diabetes, the CDC urge people to eat healthily, exercise regularly, and use medications that reduce blood glucose levels. They also emphasize the need to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high lipid levels, and to avoid tobacco use.
High LDL cholesterol associated with diabetes
CDC statistics indicate that between 2009-2012, 65 percent of people with diagnosed diabetes who were aged 18 years and above either had high levels of LDL, or "bad," cholesterol in the blood, or they were using drugs to lower cholesterol.
Amid urgent calls for new ways to prevent type 2 diabetes, some research has focused on how different carbohydrates and dietary fats impact metabolic health.
This has been controversial, and it has led to confusion regarding dietary guidelines and health priorities.
Senior author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Medford, Continue reading

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