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NHS Screening Plan For Type 2 Diabetes 'inaccurate'

NHS screening plan for type 2 diabetes 'inaccurate'

NHS screening plan for type 2 diabetes 'inaccurate'

The NHS programme for screening those at high risk of type 2 diabetes is unlikely to have much impact, an Oxford University study in the BMJ suggests.
It concluded that inaccurate blood tests would give too many people an incorrect diagnosis, while lifestyle changes had a low success rate.
But the director of the NHS programme said its approach was based on "robust evidence".
The programme started last year and will cover all of England by 2020.
Type 2 diabetes leads to 22,000 early deaths every year in England and costs the NHS £8bn.
In the UK, about 3.2 million people have type 2 diabetes and this is predicted to rise to 5 million by 2025.
The UK's National Diabetes Prevention Programme, which aims to identify thousands of people at high risk of developing the condition each year, follows a "screen and treat" approach.
This involves a screening test for pre-diabetes, then tailored treatment or advice on diet and lifestyle to prevent the disease developing.
'Falsely reassured'
But after analysing the results of 49 studies of screening tests and 50 intervention trials, University of Oxford researchers said the policy would benefit some, but not all those at high risk.
They also said a population-wide approach to diabetes prevention would be a useful addition.
In the BMJ study, they found that two blood tests - HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose - were inaccurate at detecting pre-diabetes, although they are the only ones available to doctors and patients.
They also found that lifestyle interventions lasting three to six years showed a 37% reduction in relative risk of type 2 Continue reading

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BREAKING: Flash glucose sensing available on NHS for type 1 diabetes from November

BREAKING: Flash glucose sensing available on NHS for type 1 diabetes from November

A device which checks blood glucose levels by scanning a sensor worn on their arm will be available on the NHS for people with type 1 diabetes, it was announced today.
The ‘Freestyle Libre’, from the healthcare firm Abbott, is currently the only flash glucose sensing device in existence.
The device will, subject to local health authority approval, be available on the NHS across the United Kingdom from 1st November 2017.
Flash glucose sensing is a recent development in glucose monitoring. It uses a sensor the size of a £2 coin and sits on the back of the arm with a probe just under the skin.
By ‘flashing’ the sensor with a scanning device, the user receives a blood glucose level reading, a graph of blood glucose levels for the previous eight hours and a direction arrow showing if their levels are going up or down.
Evidence shows that flash glucose monitoring can help people with type 1 diabetes manage their condition and keep in good health.
Of today’s news, Karen Addington, JDRF’s UK Chief Executive said:
“Today’s announcement is good news for people living with type 1 diabetes. But it is vital that the technology actually reaches those who want it and would benefit. There is a postcode lottery of NHS provision of type 1 diabetes technology. This is despite such devices making daily life with type 1 diabetes much easier.
“Each and every person with type 1 diabetes who wants this technology, and would benefit, should receive it. JDRF will continue to campaign in Westminster and devolved governments on this issue.”
JDRF has produced a guide to type 1 diab Continue reading

Weight loss could send diabetes into remission, scientists find

Weight loss could send diabetes into remission, scientists find

Weight loss might be more effective in achieving remission for Type 2 diabetes than traditional medical treatments, scientists have found. A new paper published in the medical journal The Lancet chronicles a three-year study of patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes, the version of the disease that manifests in adulthood, and found that 86 percent of participants who lost a certain amount of weight achieved remission from the disease, BBC reports.
Specifically, that 86 percent of patients came from the pool of study participants who lost 33 or more pounds. By comparison, just 4 percent of patients who used traditional treatment methods achieved remission, BBC reports. In total, nearly half of all participants who used a weight-loss treatment plan saw their diabetes enter remission.
The weight loss treatment required participants to stop taking medication and instead eat low-calorie liquid meals for three to five months, after which they would go on a diet approved by a dietician. Weight loss reduces fat buildup around the pancreas, the organ that regulates blood glucose levels, which the researchers found allowed diabetics to produce more insulin, thus lowering their blood sugar levels.
Patients who lost large amounts of weight had the highest rates of remission — the 86 percent mentioned above — but 34 percent of participants who lost between 11 and 22 pounds also achieved remission, as well as more than half of the patients who lost between 22 and 33 pounds. Doctors did warn, however, that the disease could return if patients do not manage their weight. Read the full Continue reading

NHS starts diabetes 'stem cell factory'

NHS starts diabetes 'stem cell factory'

The NHS is setting up a stem cell factory in Liverpool to treat people with diabetes.
NHS Blood and Transplant wants to make and give the experimental therapy to patients at high risk of developing diabetes-related kidney problems.
It is hoped the injections will slow down or stop tissue damage, removing the need for dialysis or transplants.
Diabetes is the most common cause of end stage kidney disease, which kills around 40,000 people a year in the UK.
The 48 patients taking part in the study will be treated at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and Belfast Health and Social Care Trust or at another trial site in Italy.
The injection of cells they will receive are called stromal cells and they are grown from donated human bone marrow.
These immature cells can grow and change into a variety of tissue - bone, cartilage and fat. But it is their ability to release proteins that reduce inflammation in the kidney which interests the researchers.
In animal studies, stromal cell injections have provided measurable improvements in kidney function and it is hoped they will do the same in people.
Only some of the patients in the study will get the real jab (at different doses). The others will get a dummy injection. This will let the investigators check whether the treatment really works and if it has any side effects.
Project leader Prof Timothy O'Brien, from the National University of Ireland, Galway, said: "Diabetic kidney disease is very common so any therapy that could slow the progression of this disease would have a significant impact."
About three in four pe Continue reading

Walking for a diabetes cure: Eleven-year-old reaches Gorge in record-setting walk across the U.S.

Walking for a diabetes cure: Eleven-year-old reaches Gorge in record-setting walk across the U.S.

NOAH Barnes, 11, and his father Robert, started their 311th day on the road near Maryhill Winery Thursday and planned to make at least 17 miles that day along Washington State Route 14. They decided to travel the Washington side of the Columbia River because there would be less traffic than Interstate 84.
Noah Barnes, 11, has burned through more shoes than other kids his age this year — he’s on his 11th pair — but then, none of his peers are about to become the youngest person on record to walk across America.
On Thursday, Barnes and his father, Robert, could be seen along Washington State Route 14 near Wishram, the 311th day of their more than 4,200-mile journey.
They took a short break to talk with a Chronicle reporter about the expedition that began in Key West, Fla., in early January and ends Dec. 9 in Blaine, Wash.
Rob Denning from Immense Imagery captured video footage of the interview, which will be posted on the businesses’ Facebook page, as well as the Chronicle website, www.thedalleschronicle.com.
When the long trek is finished, Noah will have walked from the farthest southeastern point of the United States to its farthest northeastern point, yet another record.
“Less than 300 people have crossed the U.S. on foot since they started tracking these journeys,” said Robert.
Setting a new record isn’t what drives Noah to get up every day and walk 17 to 22 miles or more. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 16 months old and has lived with insulin shots most of his life.
He longs for the day that needles and testing his blood sugar level multi Continue reading

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