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New Type 2 Diabetes Treatment 'easier, Cheaper' Option

New type 2 diabetes treatment 'easier, cheaper' option

New type 2 diabetes treatment 'easier, cheaper' option

About 20,000 Australians suffering type 2 diabetes will be able to swap twice daily injections for a weekly treatment, and save around $1,600 per year under a new medicine to be placed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).
Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley announced the new diabetes treatment Exanatide will be subsidised under the PBS from September 1, along with an extra $70 million investment in the scheme for a cervical cancer drug and a treatment for a rare growth disease.
"This is easier, it's cheaper and most importantly for people with type 2 diabetes, up to 20,000 who can benefit from this treatment, it will avoid long term complications," Ms Ley said.
"Unfortunately Australia has a very high rate of diabetic amputations, all of which are avoidable.
"This is part of our government's commitment to listing medicines without fear or favour on the PBS, once advised by our expert committees."
The national peak body for diabetes has welcomed the listing.
"What it means is for a lot of people living with type 2 diabetes they have several injections a day and this will actually reduce that to once a week," the association's Renza Scibilia said.
"It's an absolutely huge improvement to quality of life, to ease of treatment as well, and we know that means people are more likely to be using the treatment as it is prescribed by their healthcare professional."
Women not responding to cervical cancer treatment will have access to the drug Avastin, which will cost the Government $60 million to list on the PBS.
The Health Minister said it would greatly ease the financial imp Continue reading

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Theresa May reveals all about living with diabetes – but vows not to let it hold her back as Prime Minister

Theresa May reveals all about living with diabetes – but vows not to let it hold her back as Prime Minister

THERESA MAY has opened up about living with diabetes - but vowed not to let it hold her back in life.
The Prime Minister revealed yesterday she has to inject herself with insulin up to five times a day.
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PA:Press Association
She told ITV's Robert Peston during a Facebook live interview that fellow sufferers should not allow the illness to hold them back.
Following her diagnosis in 2012, the PM's type one diabetes means she has to keep a constant track of the glucose levels in her blood.
She was asked about her own experience by a fellow diabetic yesterday.
PA:Press Association
PA:Press Association
Mrs May said: "I am a type one diabetic. That means when I eat, I have to inject insulin, which I do.
"I will be injecting myself four or five times a day... You just get into a routine.
"You depend on that insulin and you just build that routine into your daily life. The crucial thing to me is being a diabetic doesn't stop you from doing anything."
But the interview was hijacked by a question from Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.
He posted on Facebook to ask why the PM is refusing to take part on a TV debate with him.
The first seven-way leaders debate - which is due to take place on Thursday - will feature senior spokespeople from the main political parties.
Mr Petson read out: "Hello Theresa May, as Prime Minister you've served your elite friends by giving them tax cuts when wages have stagnated, house-building is at its lowest since the 1920s, there are 20,000 fewer police on our streets since 2010 and the NHS is in crisis.
"Do you not think the British people deserve Continue reading

JDRF, the type 1 diabetes charity

JDRF, the type 1 diabetes charity

Our research
One day, we will create a world without type 1 diabetes. Until that day, your support is vital for our world-class research, improving treatments until we find the cure
We fund research that will cure, treat and prevent type 1 diabetes and its complications.
We focus on investing in research that will transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes – improving treatments today until we find the cure.
This mission cannot be carried out in isolation, so we work with partner organisations to make sure we can change life with type 1 diabetes for the better as quickly as possible. But our most important partner is you – whether you help to fund the research, join a clinical trial or campaign for access to the new treatments that research delivers you are a vital member of our team.
Search or browse through summaries of JDRF-funded research projects from around the world here.
Find out more
Discover how we're working to cure, treat and prevent type 1 diabetes Continue reading

Dealing With Diabetes and Depression

Dealing With Diabetes and Depression

Autumn is here, and shorter, cooler days are just around the corner. Everyone is back to work or school and the hectic pace is back in full swing. It’s normal to feel a little down or sad, knowing that summer is behind you. But if you’ve been feeling this way for a while and you can’t seem to shake it off (as Taylor Swift likes to sing), maybe something a little deeper and more serious is going on.
The link between diabetes and depression
According to research, people who have diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have depression than people without diabetes. While depression can affect people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, those with Type 2 are more likely to develop it. Of course, having diabetes doesn’t mean you’re headed for depression, but the likelihood is higher.
Interestingly, not only does having diabetes increase the risk of depression, but being depressed increases the risk of diabetes. In a 10-year study, women who took antidepressants were 25% more likely to develop diabetes than women who were not depressed. Also, women who took insulin were 53% more likely develop depression.
What accounts for this connection? It’s possible that changes in the brain can raise the risk of depression. Blocked blood vessels or nerve damage from having diabetes may alter brain chemistry, thus raising the risk of depression. Other factors can help explain the link:
• Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety.
• Unmanaged blood sugars (meaning, a lot of highs and lows) can be challenging and can Continue reading

GESTATIONAL DIABETES: MUST-KNOW FACTS

GESTATIONAL DIABETES: MUST-KNOW FACTS

Gestational diabetes affects one in 10 pregnancies and increases the risk of complication. Here’s what parents need to know to have a healthy pregnancy.
Pregnancy is filled with milestones – feeling the first kicks, picking a baby name, preparing baby’s nursery. But preparing for your glucose challenge test may raise some questions.
Learn what a gestational diabetes diagnosis could really mean, how to reduce your overall risk and, most importantly, how to keep both you and your baby happy and healthy through it all.
What is gestational diabetes, really?
Traditional diabetes is a condition that develops when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, a hormone that helps deliver glucose (aka sugar) from your bloodstream and into your cells and organs for energy.
"Unlike Type 1 and 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes is caused in part by physiological changes that occur during pregnancy and affects one in 10 pregnant women," explains Christina Sherry, PhD, RD, a nutrition scientist with Abbott. "During pregnancy, pregnancy hormones can reduce or block the effectiveness of mom’s own insulin," she says. Coupled with other risk factors – everything from being overweight, having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or having a family history of Type 2 diabetes – this insulin resistance can progress to the point of gestational diabetes.
"Gestational diabetes can pose some health risks for mom and baby, including the risk of a high birth weight, jaundice, breathing problems for baby and increased chances of high blood pressure and preeclampsia for mom (a potentially Continue reading

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