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New Study Questions Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

New study questions Type 2 diabetes treatment

New study questions Type 2 diabetes treatment

Kelly Crowe is a medical sciences correspondent for CBC News, specializing in health and biomedical research. She joined CBC in 1991, and has spent 25 years reporting on a wide range of national news and current affairs, with a particular interest in science and medicine.
It's a curious case of missing evidence. When a diabetes specialist searched the medical literature looking for proof to support the use of glucose-lowering drugs for Type 2 diabetes, he couldn't find it.
That absence of evidence raises questions about one of the most firmly entrenched beliefs in modern medicine — that tightly controlling elevated blood sugar will reduce the risk of death, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and other dire outcomes associated with Type 2 diabetes.
"Does controlling your sugars reduce the risk of complications?" Dr. Victor Montori, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., asked in a paper released this month in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. "Most experts say yes. The evidence appears to say 'not so fast.'"
Conventional wisdom challenged
Right now, millions of people are taking glucose-lowering drugs, routinely pricking their finger to check their blood sugar level, and fretting over test results that aren't as low as their doctor wants them to be in hopes of avoiding the dire outcomes associated with the disease.
But with the drugs comes the risk of side-effects including weight gain and, if blood sugar falls too low, dizziness, coma or even death.
Add to that the distress of being branded with a "disease" based on a routine blood test, even t Continue reading

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WHO and ADA promote 5 cups of coffee to prevent type 2 diabetes???

WHO and ADA promote 5 cups of coffee to prevent type 2 diabetes???

5 Cups of Coffee a Day for Type 2 Diabetes?
By Steve McDermott on January 10th, 2017
(Steve McDermott is a person with type 2 diabetes who wrote this article for Diabetes Daily).
“Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together.
5 cups is good? If WHO says so, there might be something to it. Right?
However, new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for:
• Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…)
• Cancer (prostate, breast…)
• Parkinsons disease
• …And type 2 diabetes!
According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine:
(Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast)
What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes).
Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups!
You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee):
Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question
When talking about coffee and diabetes Continue reading

New study claims statin drugs raise the risk of type-2 diabetes by almost 30%

New study claims statin drugs raise the risk of type-2 diabetes by almost 30%

(Natural News) Diabetes is one of the most common types of non-communicable diseases that kills millions of people yearly. Recent studies show that taking statins, or drugs that lower blood cholesterol, have a 30 percent chance in increasing the risk of developing type-2 diabetes.
Medical personnel have always known of the side effects of these drugs, but stress that the advantages significantly outweigh their disadvantages. Nevertheless, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have stated that these drugs impair insulin production. Insulin is a peptide hormone that regulates blood sugar level. When inadequate or absent, causes diabetes mellitus.
The decade-long study of more than 3,200 patients who took statins to treat and minimize the effects of cardiovascular diseases showed that statin-users had a 30 percent higher risk of developing type-2 diabetes. Despite the negative effects of statins, around six million Britons continue to take it, because it has been proven to lessen the chance of experiencing a repeat attack.
Dr. Tim Chico, a consultant cardiologist at Sheffield University, says that even if the study confirms the small risk of diabetes with statin treatment, the other main causes of diabetes, which are being overweight and obese, should be given more attention.
The effect of poor lifestyle choices
Diabetes is the result of an unbalanced and unhealthy lifestyle. Diabetes is also indicative of an intolerance for carbohydrates. The condition can be avoided by practicing proper nutrition habits and by engaging in a more active lifestyle. Continue reading

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Connecting The Dots
My journey started long before I ever knew anything about thyroid disease. At twenty-five years old, I found out my father had his first heart attack and that he also had type 2 diabetes. That side of the family had a predisposition to being overweight and not living a healthy lifestyle. This scared me so much that I took drastic measures. In 1989, I changed everything about my diet. Eliminating all white sugar, white flour, process foods and all hormone/antibiotic meats and dairy from my eating regiment. My family and friends thought I was crazy. I thought I would be able to manipulate my genetics and prevent the inevitable path to disease.
Early on I battled with sugar imbalances and weight fluctuations for no apparent reason, but paid no attention to it as exercise fixed everything. Unknowingly, Hashimoto’s was already fixated on my physiology. Determined to beat the odds, I had to be consciously aware of what I ate and how I took care of myself.
Diagnosed is 2012 with Hashimoto’s and hypothyroid, I now had a new challenge: getting well and getting this disease under control so I could live my life. The last five years has had its ups and downs. For the last two years, I have been trying to lower my total cholesterol and LDL, while my triglycerides and glucose have been doing the roller-coaster dance. Nothing seemed to be working.
I turned 53 years old in June, two years from my father’s first heart attack. At the end of May, I had a sub fraction lipid test to determine what exactly my lipids were doing before deciding to add another drug to reg Continue reading

Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

I. Introduction
DIABETES MELLITUS IS a complex metabolic disease that can have devastating effects on multiple organs in the body. Diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States (1) and is also a common cause of vision loss, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. A less addressed and not as well recognized complication of diabetes is cognitive dysfunction. Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been found to have cognitive deficits that can be attributed to their disease. Both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia have been implicated as causes of cognitive dysfunction, and many patients fear that recurrent hypoglycemia will impair their memory over time. Although much research has been done, the pathophysiology underlying this complication is not well understood, and the most appropriate methods to diagnose, treat, and prevent cognitive dysfunction in diabetes have not yet been defined. In this article, we will review the nature of cognitive dysfunction in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction secondary to diabetes, methodologies used to assess cognitive deficits in patients with diabetes, and potential future directions of research that are needed to advance our understanding of this often overlooked complication of diabetes.
The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the subject of cognitive dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To do this, we performed MEDLINE searches for such key words and terms as “diabetes mellitus,” “cognitive fun Continue reading

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