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New Study Finds That Sitting For Protracted Periods Increases The Risk Of Diabetes, Heart Disease And Death

New study finds that sitting for protracted periods increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease and death

New study finds that sitting for protracted periods increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease and death

Latest news from Loughborough University
A new study led by the University of Leicester, in association with colleagues at Loughborough University, has discovered that sitting for long periods increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease and death.
The study combined the results of 18 studies and included a total of 794,577 participants. It was led by Dr Emma Wilmot, a research fellow in the Diabetes Research Group at the University of Leicester, and carried out in collaboration with colleagues from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester – Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit.
According to the study, those who sit for long periods have a two fold increase in their risk of diabetes, heart disease and death. Importantly, associations were independent of the amount of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity undertaken, suggesting that even if an individual meets typical physical activity guidelines, their health may still be compromised if they sit for long periods of time throughout the day.
Dr Wilmot, a Clinical Research Fellow in Diabetes and Endocrinology based at the Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, said: “The average adult spends 50-70% of their time sitting so the findings of this study have far reaching implications. By simply limiting the time that we spend sitting, we may be able to reduce our risk of diabetes, heart disease and death.
“Our study also showed that the most consistent associations were between sitting and diabetes. This is an important message because people with r Continue reading

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The case for preventing diabetes over cure ― David Heber

The case for preventing diabetes over cure ― David Heber

NOVEMBER 14 ― As we mark World Diabetes Day today, it is timely to review the fight against diabetes, especially in Singapore.
“If you look at yourself, and at the person sitting to your left, person sitting to your right, most probably at least one of you will have diabetes one day,” said Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the National Day Rally in August.
According to the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF), Singapore has one of the highest incidences of diabetes among developed countries, trailing behind only the United States. One in nine Singaporeans aged between 20 and 79 are diabetic, and this number increases further with age, with three in 10 Singaporeans aged over 60 suffering from the disease.
While worrying, these findings are hardly surprising, as Singaporeans have become more sedentary and less active over time, just like other high-income countries.
And contrary to popular belief, the more common type of diabetes is Type 2 diabetes ― a lifestyle disease arising from poor diets and the lack of exercise.
This marks a stark contrast against the cause of Type 1 diabetes ― an auto-immune condition where the body becomes resistant to insulin and loses its ability to produce enough insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels.
Type 1 diabetes is also largely believed to have genetic links, but the underlying cause still baffles scientists and researchers today.
In fact, over 90 per cent of diabetics suffer from Type 2 diabetes, which develops over a two to 10 year period after high levels of blood sugar are recorded.
Studies done at multiple US centres a Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Market Size Worth USD 25.52 Billion By 2024: Hexa Research

Type 1 Diabetes Market Size Worth USD 25.52 Billion By 2024: Hexa Research

Sedentary lifestyles, unhealthy diet habits coupled with rising obesity rates will further enhance the uptake of various types of insulin for the treatment of this disorder. Though this type of diabetes is rare still the number of cases is increasing by 3% every year according to the data enumerated by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).
Insulin therapy is very much essential in the patients who have type 1 diabetes. Rising launch of the novel insulin formulations along with several adjunct therapies will positively impact the insulin acceptance. On the other hand, this chronic disorder poses a significant economic impact owing to the increasing cost of insulin coupled with other conditions such as cardiac disorders, kidney disease among others. This affects the respective countries and their national healthcare systems. For instance, the expenditure on diabetes management accounts for around 5% to 20% of the total healthcare spending.
Browse full research report with TOC on "Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Market Size and Forecast, By Insulin Analog (rapid Acting, long Acting, Premix Analogs), And Trend Analysis, 2014 - 2024" at: https://www.hexaresearch.com/research-report/type-1-diabetes-t1d-market
Rapid-acting, long-acting and premix analogs are the three major types of insulin analogs administered to the patients. These insulin types when delivered duplicate the action of natural insulin and avoid the excess release of glucose in blood cells. The market penetration of long-acting insulin products is higher as compared to other two types, however, during the forecast per Continue reading

The Best Diabetes Nonprofits of 2017

The Best Diabetes Nonprofits of 2017


The diaTribe foundation wants to make life happier and healthier for people living with diabetes, prediabetes , and obesity. They advocate for recognizing the emotional impact that diabetes has, as well as collaboration across government, nonprofits, and the healthcare industry. The foundations publication, diaTribe , presents advice, resources, and educational guides for people living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This includes medical device reviews and diabetes-specific lifestyle tips. Check out their list of recommended blogs and forums for personal stories, family support issues, and many other topics.
DiabetesSisters was founded in response to a need for more education and advocacy around the health of women with diabetes. Their site hosts webinars and has expert advice . In its mission to support and empower women with diabetes, the site also provides several community forums. Women can share and learn from others personal stories in the sisterTALK blogs. And they extend that community offline through the Part of DiabetesSisters (PODS) meetups . Find a meetup near you or sign up to start your own.
Diabetes Hands Foundation wants to build a sense of community around diabetes, believing that no one living with diabetes should feel alone. They provide support and access to tools, with two social networks and advocacy leadership. Their blood-testing initiative, Big Blue Test , highlights the positive impact that healthy lifestyle choices can have on the disease. Visit their site to learn more, donate, or read the latest news from their blog .
JDRF wants to help m Continue reading

Popular Diabetes Drugs: Trends

Popular Diabetes Drugs: Trends


If youve had Type 2 diabetes for a number of years, theres a good chance youre taking at least one drug to help control your blood glucose levels and possibly two or more drugs, including insulin . Any changes made to your prescriptions will most likely have been based on problems youve had with previous therapies, including less than adequate blood glucose control.
While changes to your medical needs are a key factor in what your doctor prescribes, its also true that outside factors play a role after all, new diabetes drugs are constantly being introduced, and certain older (and newer) drugs may fall out of favor. So how have diabetes drug prescriptions changed over the years, and what might explain these changes?
A study published in November 2017 in the journal Diabetes Care sheds some light on prescribing practices over the last few years. Using electronic medical records, researchers looked at the drugs prescribed to over 1 million people, ages 18 to 80, with Type 2 diabetes between 2005 and 2016. They identified drugs used as first-line treatments, as well as those added later if needed to help boost blood glucose control.
As noted in an article on the study at Healio, the most popular first-line drug in both 2005 and 2016 was metformin . But over that period, it grew even more popular from a share of 60% of study participants to 77%. At the same time, use of sulfonylureas as a first-line treatment dropped from 20% to 8%, and the rate for thiazolidinediones dropped from 11% to 0.7%. The use of insulin as a first-line treatment stayed similar, rising slightly f Continue reading

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