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New Self-Administering ‘Smart’ Insulin Could Revolutionise Diabetes Treatment

New Self-Administering ‘Smart’ Insulin Could Revolutionise Diabetes Treatment

New Self-Administering ‘Smart’ Insulin Could Revolutionise Diabetes Treatment

This new form of ‘smart’ insulin remains in the blood stream for 24 hours, and maintains blood sugar levels on its own. Which means no more finger pricks or insulin pens.
Researchers in the US have developed a new type of insulin that’s injected once a day into the blood-stream, and then is automatically activated only when a person’s blood sugar levels are high enough. This means a type 1 diabetes patient doesn’t need to worry about keep tabs on their condition throughout the day, because the ‘smart’ insulin has got it covered.
The new compound, called Ins-PBA-F, was developed by researchers at the University of Utah and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and has so far shown very positive outcomes in diabetic mice. The team was able to ensure that it remained in the blood stream for 24 hours by adding a molecule known as an aliphatic domain, which is made up of a long chain of fatty acids that dangle from the insulin molecule. This chain, the researchers think, links to a blood protein called albumin, which allows the insulin to be stored safely, without the risk of it accidentally linking to other sugar molecules in the blood.
And there it sits, until blood sugar levels hit a critical threshold, which causes it to be released so it can lower the amount of glucose back to safe levels. The team also added a chemical called PBA (Phenylboronic Acid) to their new insulin, which can not only attach to glucose molecules, but also detach again once the job is done.
Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, the researc Continue reading

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Diabetes Diet: Why Cucumbers Belong In Your Shopping Cart

Diabetes Diet: Why Cucumbers Belong In Your Shopping Cart

Cucumbers have a veggie flavor that is nearly not there.
“A cucumber is “...about as close to neutrality as a vegetable can get without ceasing to exist,” wrote food journalist, Waverley Root.
On top of it’s taste neutrality, cucumbers are not even a veggie. Cucumbers develop from the plant’s flower and contain the plant’s seeds, making this culinary-veggie a fruit.
5 Reasons To Shop For Cucumbers
Identity crisis aside, when it comes to health benefits cucumbers are hardly neutral. They are a highly beneficial addition to diabetes meal plans for several reasons.
Reduce Inflammation. Many chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and heart disease have been associated with increased systemic inflammation. Cucumbers help “cool” the body’s inflammatory responses.
Stress Management. Because cucumbers contain a slew of B vitamins including B1, B5, and B7 (biotin), they help calm our tension and anxiety. The B vitamins may also guard against stress's harmful effects.
Support Good Digestive Health. We all need plenty of water and fiber for good digestion, and cucumbers are loaded with both. The fiber in cucumber skin is the insoluble variety that helps food move through the digestive tract more efficiently, and aids elimination.
Support Cardiovascular Health. Nerve signals, muscle contractions, and healthy heart function require concentrations of potassium in and outside our cells. Cucumbers are a good source of potassium.
Help With Weight Control. An entire cup of sliced cucumber is only 16 calories, making it a great snack. Plus, the Continue reading

Chemical Found In Ayahuasca May Be Able To Completely Reverse Diabetes

Chemical Found In Ayahuasca May Be Able To Completely Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes currently affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. In America alone, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that number to be approximately 20 million. Potential cures and methods to reverse the disease are showing some promising results, and one of them is a chemical that’s commonly found in a number of plants around the world. It’s also a main ingredient in the psychoactive mixture commonly known as ayahuasca.
Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that prevents a person’s pancreas from producing insulin, which is a hormone that enables people to receive energy from their food. This occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, which are called beta cells. Apparently, the cause is not well understood, but scientists believe that genetic and environmental factors play a role. Modern day mainstream science tells us that there are no cures.
Again, types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells, which is where this chemical is showing the most promising results.
New research published in the journal Nature Medicine – a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, funded by JDRF and the National Institutes of Health – found that:
“Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo–based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations sugg Continue reading

12 Do’s and Don’ts for Supporting a Loved One with Diabetes

12 Do’s and Don’ts for Supporting a Loved One with Diabetes

Managing diabetes is hard. It takes constant work to stay on top of, and even the smallest food choices can throw off one’s blood sugar. It can make life difficult not only for those dealing with diabetes, but also for the family members and friends who are trying to support them. The good news is that those with diabetes are usually able to better manage their disease with the support of loved ones. But do family and friends always know the best ways to offer help? Here are 12 do’s and don’ts for supporting a loved one with diabetes. If you’re looking to help someone with the condition, use these tips to offer the right kind of assistance.
12. Do: Recognize It’s Difficult
The first step toward helping those with diabetes can be acknowledging that managing the disease isn’t easy. It’s difficult and tricky — sometimes blood sugar seems to spike randomly. Let your loved one with diabetes know that you recognize the hard work they are doing in dealing with it.
11. Don’t: Be the Diabetes Police
Nobody wants someone constantly looking over their shoulder. While it’s OK for family members to be concerned about their loved one’s choices, they shouldn’t go so far as being a nag and policing that person’s lifestyle. It’s hard enough living with diabetes; don’t make your loved one feel like they’re also breaking the law.
10. Do: Educate Yourself
One of the biggest ways friends and family can help a loved one with diabetes is to learn more about the disease. Managing diabetes is much more complicated than counting carbs and keeping blood sugar low. The Continue reading

How a 504 Plan Benefits Parents and Students with Diabetes

How a 504 Plan Benefits Parents and Students with Diabetes

If your child has diabetes, you want him or her to be safe while in school and to have the same educational opportunities as other children. Implementing a “504 Plan” can help set your mind at ease on both accounts.
Section 504
The phrase “504 Plan” refers to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This section prohibits discrimination against those with disabilities in all public and private schools that benefit from federal funding.
A 504 plan can also be set up under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) which protects students with disabilities in all public and private schools, but not those governed by religious institutions. However, if the religious institution accepts federal funds, ADA rulings apply there as well.
An Ounce of Prevention
Every 504 plan should contain an assurance that there will be school staff members trained to recognize symptoms of hyper and hypoglycemia, and that they will respond to your child's need according to the directions set up in the student's Diabetes Medical Management Plan.
The American Diabetes Association has a downloadable Model 504 Plan for use or reference, and some school districts have developed their own 504 plan. Whatever template is used, your child’s plan will have to be adjusted to meet their specific needs. Because model plans are typically set up for children with type 1 diabetes, they need modification to benefit children with type 2 diabetes.
It is unwise to assume every school is prepared or equipped to care for students managing diabetes. Even if a school nurse is on staff, he or she may not al Continue reading

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