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New Metformin May Help More Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

New metformin may help more patients with type 2 diabetes

New metformin may help more patients with type 2 diabetes

A new study shows that the glucose-lowering effect of metformin - a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes - takes place in the gut and not in the bloodstream.
The revelation, published in the journal Diabetes Care, means that a delayed-release form of metformin that the researchers tested could suit the 40% of type 2 diabetes patients who cannot use the current formulation.
Metformin (short for metformin hydrochloride, also known as Glucophage and other brand names) has been used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes for nearly 60 years.
Despite the drug's veteran status, scientists are not exactly sure how and where in the body most of its glucose-lowering effect takes place.
The new study, led by the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill, provides strong evidence that metformin does most of its work in the gut, and not in the bloodstream, as many had assumed.
First author John Buse, a professor of medicine, says:
"Our clinical trials show that metformin works largely in the lower intestine, reversing half a century of conventional thinking."
In their paper, the team describes how they carried out a phase 1 and a phase 2 trial of the experimental drug Metformin Delayed Release (Metformin DR). Prof. Buse says:
"These studies provide evidence that delivering Metformin DR to the lower bowel significantly reduces the amount of metformin in the blood, while maintaining its glucose-lowering effect."
Trials show Metformin DR may suit kidney-impaired patients
One of the main reasons metformin is not suitable for all patients with type 2 diabetes is because it c Continue reading

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Diabetes-Friendly Party Drink Recipes

Diabetes-Friendly Party Drink Recipes

Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people.
Festive drinks are a necessity when hosting a party, and now you can quench your thirst without relying on high-calorie cocktails. Whether you're looking for alcoholic mixed drinks or nonalcoholic mocktails, our collection of favorite healthy party drink recipes serve at least six people. Continue reading

Dr. Oz’s Anti-Diabetes Drink

Dr. Oz’s Anti-Diabetes Drink

Directions
Mix water and vinegar together in drinking glass. Pour psyllium husk fiber into glass and stir. Drink every day before dinner to prevent the sugar spike and crash before bed.
Tried this recipe? Log in to DoctorOz.com to rate it and find more recipes just for you. Continue reading

Reduced sugar in soft drinks would prevent diabetes, study says

Reduced sugar in soft drinks would prevent diabetes, study says

Reducing the amount of sugar in soft drinks and fruit juices by 40% over five years could prevent 300,000 cases of diabetes in the UK and stop 1.5 million people from being overweight or obese, according to a study.
The report, immediately welcomed by Public Health England as a particular route to curbing excess weight in young people, is based on efforts to reduce salt content in many foods, which has already seen the amount used cut by a similar amount over the same time period.
Published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, the study used data from both the government’s national diet and nutrition survey and the British Soft Drinks Association (BSDA) to calculate the consumption of so-called sugar-sweetened beverages, and how much they contribute to UK-wide sugar and energy intakes.
The authors, Prof Graham MacGregor and fellow academics at Queen Mary University of London, then estimated how much a person’s energy intake would fall through the hypothetical drop in sugar content, and the resultant reduction in body weight.
The report calculated that the 40% drop in sugar over five years would, by the end of the final year, see an average drop in adult body weight of 1.2kg, meaning about 500,000 adults would no longer be overweight and a million would not be obese.
This in turn would prevent between 274,000 and 309,000 cases of obesity-related type 2 diabetes over the next 20 years, the report concluded.
If fruit juices were excluded from the scheme, the study said, it could still prevent up to 250,000 cases of diabetes over the same period, with an averag Continue reading

7 Diabetes Technology Updates for 2018

7 Diabetes Technology Updates for 2018

As I gathered my notes and thoughts about the potential of diabetes technology in 2018, I kept coming back to the running list of caveats and elephants in the room. Access and affordability have been headline-generating conversations across the diabetes community this year. On one hand, it feels a little weird to talk about crazy-advanced technology that will hopefully make its way to the diabetes community next year while we’re still trying to figure out why live-sustaining medication costs as much as it does. If you are struggling to afford insulin, do you have room to get excited about automated insulin delivery?
But, innovation is important.
The clinical trials and resources spent developing better, smarter, faster tools are essential to the grander conversation about improving the lives of people with diabetes. This shouldn’t ignore the Very Real issues that are being discussed, so I’m going to propose we try to walk and chew gum at the same time. Yes, I want better technology to help manage my diabetes. Yes, it should be affordable so that no one is priced out of quality diabetes care.
When I think about the scope and potential of diabetes technology, it’s more than just a specific product or products that may come to market. So here’s a glimpse at some of the companies and movements that I am going to pay close attention to next year as diabetes technology looks to take another major step forward in 2018.
Tandem’s PLGS Algorithm
PLGS, or Predictive Low Glucose Suspend, Tandem’s algorithm that will predict and prevent hypoglycemia events is coming next y Continue reading

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