diabetestalk.net

New Diabetes Treatment Available In Palm Beach Gardens

New Diabetes treatment available in Palm Beach Gardens

New Diabetes treatment available in Palm Beach Gardens

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. —
A new diabetes treatment is being offered at the Nicklaus Children’s Palm Beach Gardens Outpatient Center.
“With the new pump there’s a lot of consistency and peace of mind and it just helps me live normally,” said Colton Smith, a 16-year-old high school football player who has Type 1 diabetes and started treatment a few months ago.
The Medtronic MiniMed 670G system works by automatically measuring blood sugar, predicting when a rise or fall is going to occur, and continuously delivering precise doses of insulin. Eight patients at the center in Palm Beach Gardens are currently using it but medical staff said they’d like to add more.
“When our kids were growing up we had to go to Orlando or Miami and now they can do things here,” said legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus. He and his wife Barbara said they are just happy to have the means to be able to help. Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis

Diabetes educator role boundaries in Australia: a documentary analysis

Abstract
Background
Diabetes educators provide self-management education for people living with diabetes to promote optimal health and wellbeing. Their national association is the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA), established in 1981. In Australia the diabetes educator workforce is a diverse, interdisciplinary entity, with nurses, podiatrists, dietitians and several other health professional groups recognised by ADEA as providers of diabetes education. Historically nurses have filled the diabetes educator role and anecdotally, nurses are perceived to have wider scope of practice when undertaking the diabetes educator role than the other professions eligible to practise diabetes education. The nature of the interprofessional role boundaries and differing scopes of practice of diabetes educators of various primary disciplines are poorly understood. Informed by a documentary analysis, this historical review explores the interprofessional evolution of the diabetes educator workforce in Australia and describes the major drivers shaping the role boundaries of diabetes educators from 1981 until 2017.
This documentary analysis was undertaken in the form of a literature review. STARLITE framework guided the searches for grey and peer reviewed literature. A timeline featuring the key events and changes in the diabetes educator workforce was developed. The timeline was analysed and emerging themes were identified as the major drivers of change within this faction of the health workforce.
This historical review illustrates that there have been drivers at the macro, meso Continue reading

Taking blood pressure drugs at night wards off diabetes, study finds

Taking blood pressure drugs at night wards off diabetes, study finds

(Mike Derer / Associated Press)
Sometimes, disease-prevention really is this simple: Adults with high blood pressure who take all of their hypertension medications before they go to bed, rather than in the morning, are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, new research has found.
The new findings are in line with other insights gleaned by the same investigators: that hypertension patients who are most at risk of developing diabetes -- and cardiovascular disease -- are those whose blood pressure fails to show a substantial dip during sleep.
It stood to reason, then, that a medication regimen that more tightly controls a hypertensive's blood pressure while he or she sleeps might help to at least forestall the development of Type 2 diabetes.
In a large clinical trial conducted in Spain and published Wednesday in the journal Diabetologia, that hypothesis turned out to be true. And effecting such tight nighttime blood-pressure control turned out to be as simple as having subjects take their hypertension drugs -- whether ACE inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers or beta blockers -- before they turned in for the night.
A drop in blood pressure is normal while sleeping. But not all people see such a dip while they sleep, and some see more shallow dips.
A second trial, also published in Diabetologia on Wednesday and conducted by the same group of Spanish researchers, found that subjects whose blood pressure did not dip, and those whose readings dipped more briefly or shallowly, were more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those whose sleep-time blood pressure saw a deep an Continue reading

Is “Keto” the Key to Reversing Diabetes?

Is “Keto” the Key to Reversing Diabetes?

SEATTLE -- A wave of recent studies show that in many cases, type 2 diabetes is partly or wholly reversible with high fat, very low carb ketogenic diets.
Speakers at the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute 5th annual Thought Leaders Consortium urged the clinical community to radically re-think the received wisdom about this common disorder, and start applying diet and lifestyle programs that actually address the root causes of the condition.
Fresh data from an ongoing study of 232 overweight or obese women and men with type 2 diabetes (average age 54 years, average BMI of 41), provide evidence that after 10 weeks on a carefully-formulated low-carb ketogenic diet, 36% were able to stop insulin therapy completely, while an additional 51% were able to significantly lower their doses.
Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measures dropped from 7.5% to 6.5%, with 56% of the participants reaching A1c levels below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. This was accompanied by clinically significant weight loss in 71% of cases (McKenzie A, et al. JMIR Diabetes. 2017 2 (1): e5).
Though many clinicians and researchers have long predicted the possibility, this is the first large-scale study to show that major biomarkers of type 2 diabetes can be consistently shifted in the right direction via dietary interventions.
“We are very pleased with what we are seeing,” said Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Officer and co-founder of Virta Health, a San Francisco based clinic specializing in lifestyle-based treatment of diabetes and related metabolic diseases. “And all of this is based Continue reading

Polydipsia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

Polydipsia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

Polydipsia is the medical term for extreme thirst, which does not improve no matter how much a person drinks.
It is not a disease by itself but can be an important symptom of certain health problems, such as diabetes. People who have this symptom should always see a doctor.
This article aims to help readers understand polydipsia and how to manage it.
What is polydipsia?
Everyone knows the feeling of thirst. For example, a person may drink large amounts of fluid to relieve thirst brought on after eating salty food, strenuous exercise, or a day in the hot sun.
This type of thirst usually doesn't last long and is easily quenched with fluids.
Polydipsia, on the other hand, can last days, weeks, or even longer depending on the cause. An individual with polydipsia tends to be thirsty most if not all the time, despite regularly drinking large amounts of fluid.
Comments such as "I can't get enough to drink" or "my mouth is so dry" are possible indicators that the person has polydipsia.
Polyuria (large amounts of urine) almost always accompanies polydipsia. One of the kidneys' primary jobs is to help the body find the right balance of water and other fluids.
Polyuria is defined as passing 3 or more liters of urine in 24 hours in adults.
The kidneys also pass more than fluid. For example, sodium and potassium often leave the body along with urine. This can lead to changes in these salts in the body, which can introduce other problems.
While other symptoms found with polydipsia depend on its cause, a common symptom is a dry mouth.
How much water should I drink every day?
How much wate Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Diabetes treatment: THIS new drug could be biggest development since discovery of insulin

    Researchers have discovered that a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes patients could also benefit those with type 1 diabetes. A study by the University of Buffalo has revealed that type 1 patients given dapagliflozin - a medication traditionally given to type 2 sufferers - experienced a significant decline in their blood sugar levels. Until now, there hadn’t been a significant developme ...

  • New diabetes treatment teaches rogue immune cells to behave

    (Getty Images) A treatment targeting wayward immune cells in people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may help even years later, a new study finds. For the treatment, researchers take blood from a person with diabetes and separate out the immune system cells (lymphocytes). They briefly expose those cells to stem cells from umbilical cord blood from an unrelated infant. Then they return the lymphocyte ...

  • U tests new transplant treatment for Type 1 diabetes

    Researchers at the University of Minnesota have studied everything from human organ donors to specially grown pigs as sources of insulin-producing islet cells for people with type 1 diabetes who lack them. Now they are testing the transplant of islets from a new source — embryonic stem cells. The university earlier this fall became the third U.S. academic institution to transplant an islet cell ...

  • New study questions Type 2 diabetes treatment

    Kelly Crowe is a medical sciences correspondent for CBC News, specializing in health and biomedical research. She joined CBC in 1991, and has spent 25 years reporting on a wide range of national news and current affairs, with a particular interest in science and medicine. It's a curious case of missing evidence. When a diabetes specialist searched the medical literature looking for proof to suppor ...

  • New diabetes treatment tops Cleveland Clinic's Top 10 Medical Innovations 2018 list (photos)

    CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An insulin pump that functions like an artificial pancreas ranked No. 1 on Cleveland Clinic's list of the Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2018. The announcement of the entire list will be made Wednesday as part of the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit. Other innovations being honored include gene therapy for blindness, new ways of creating vaccines and targeted breast ca ...

  • Research Roundup: Lupus protein identified, vaccine for Type 1 diabetes, new chronic pain treatment, andmore!

    Research Roundup: Lupus protein identified, vaccine for Type 1 diabetes, new chronic pain treatment, andmore! Welcome to this weeks Research Roundup. These Friday posts aim to inform our readers about the many stories that relate to animal research each week. Do you have an animal research story we should include in next weeks Research Roundup? You can send it to us via our Facebook page or thr ...

  • Diabetes: New pathway to treatment suggested by protein culprit

    What is the link between anxiety and diabetes? New research shows that a protein related to the development of anxiety and depression may also play a role in triggering diabetes. Scientists from the Max Planck Institutes hypothesize that an antagonist compound could be used to block its effect. The main known causes for type 2 diabetes so far include obesity and lack of physical exercise — both ...

  • NEW METHODS IN TREATMENT OF DIABETES

    Innovations and technological advances in treatment methods, as well as developments that are gradually leading to production of an artificial pancreas and modern glucose meters that operate just like smartphones, are aimed to increase the life quality of diabetics. Diabetes, which has an adverse effect on life quality and lifespan by progressing silently when not diagnosed, is a disease of which ...

  • New Stem Cell Treatment, Successful in Mice, May Someday Cure Type 1 Diabetes

    When his infant son Sam was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two decades ago, Doug Melton made himself a promise: He would cure it. When his daughter Emma was diagnosed with the same autoimmune disease at 14, he redoubled his efforts. Finally he can see the finish line. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Cell, Melton announces that he has created a virtually unlimited supply of the cells t ...

Related Articles