diabetestalk.net

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The US?

New Diabetes Tech on The Horizon: What’s Coming by Mid-2017 in the US?

New Diabetes Tech on The Horizon: What’s Coming by Mid-2017 in the US?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown
What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome
Want more news just like this?
We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c.
Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below.
New Insulin Delivery Devices
Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms.
Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions).
LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Type 2 Diabetes Early Warning Signs

Type 2 Diabetes Early Warning Signs

Although 24 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes, it's estimated that an additional 5.7 million people have the disease but don't know it. Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose).
Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel.
If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems.
Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes—when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes—and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered.
Complications
Long-term complications of diabetes develop gradually. The longer you have diabetes—and the less controlled your blood sugar—the higher the risk of complications. Eventually, diabetes complications may be disabling or even life-threatening.
Possible complications include cardiovascular disease, nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage (nephropathy), eye damage (retinopathy), foot damage, skin conditions, and hearing impairment.
Type 2 diabetes may also increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. The poorer your blood sugar control, the greater the risk appears to be. Although there are theories as to how these disorders might be Continue reading

Living with Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

Living with Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

When thinking of diabetes what is the first thing that comes to your mind? Insulin? Injections? Of course, these things are very important – for type 1 diabetics. However, almost 90% of all diabetics have type 2 and mostly don’t need to inject insulin. But nevertheless, having type 2 diabetes can change your life completely and you need to take good care of your health. In the UK there are more than 135 and in the US more than 1400 diabetes-related amputations – every week.
But the good news is: it doesn’t need to get that far. With the right treatment and responsible behavior, you can do a lot to prevent the progress of your diabetes. And you’re not alone: There are a lot of bloggers providing insight into their lives with type 2 diabetes, sharing their experience and motivation. How do I keep my blood glucose levels stable? What is the right diet for me? And is there an app that supports me with my diabetes? We’ve collected 20 of the most inspiring blogs about type 2 diabetes that you need to read:
Are you missing one of your favorite blogs? Please write us in the comment section below.
Diabetes Ramblings
Sue writes about her personal experiences with type 2 diabetes and how she is dealing with her life as a mom of five. She says about herself: “I may have type 2 diabetes but it doesn't have me!”
diabetesramblings.com
Diabetes Stops Here
On this blog, run by the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes share their stories about “what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs”.
d Continue reading

Diet and Diabetes: Recipes for Success

Diet and Diabetes: Recipes for Success

Diabetes Basics
In the past few years, much of what we thought we knew about diabetes has been turned on its head. New understanding of the nutritional causes of diabetes gives us the power to keep it from occurring or to turn it around.
Here is what is supposed to happen: Our bodies turn starchy and sweet foods into glucose for our muscle cells to use for fuel. Insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, ushers glucose into the cells. People with type 2 diabetes, the most common type, generally have enough insulin. However, their cells become resistant to it, leaving too much glucose in the bloodstream, where it can cause problems.
Over the short run, people with uncontrolled diabetes may feel tired, thirsty, urinate frequently, and notice blurred vision. In the long run, they are at risk for heart disease, kidney problems, vision loss, nerve damage, and other difficulties.
Dietary Approaches to Diabetes
Diabetes diets typically call for portion control, carbohydrate limits, and, for those who are overweight, calorie restrictions. Fortunately, there is another way. Low-fat, plant-based diets are ideal for diabetes and the conditions associated with it, such as heart disease, weight gain, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. And they offer the advantage of not requiring any weighing or measuring of portions. Going hungry is not necessary!
The old approach recommended cutting down on carbohydrates. It’s true that overly processed carbohydrates—those made with sugar or white flour, for example—are poor choices. However, delicious unprocessed or minimally processed fo Continue reading

Intermittent fasting could help tackle diabetes – here’s the science

Intermittent fasting could help tackle diabetes – here’s the science

INDYPULSE
Intermittent fasting could help tackle diabetes – here’s the science
Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet.
The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were impressed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health.
The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial.
The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learnt that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits.
There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This ap Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • The High-Tech Business of Diabetes

    Diabetes is big business. If you don't believe me, just Google the term "diabetes is big business" to see the headlines that agree. As of 2012, $245 billion was spent in the United States alone per year, and that has some people believing there will never be a cure—there is too much money in it. Maybe that's true, maybe not. But there are plenty of companies out there making products intended to ...

  • Will High-Tech Skin Put an End to Needle Sticks for Diabetes?

    Painful and inconvenient, needle sticks are part of daily life for many people with diabetes. Wouldn’t it be great if there were some high-tech wearable that could monitor blood glucose levels continuously and noninvasively — that is, without the need to pierce the skin? We’re not there yet, but we’re getting closer. The FDA just approved a skin patch with a small through-the-skin wire tha ...

  • Can Silicon Valley Cure Diabetes With Low Carbs And High Tech?

    Imagine a treatment for Type 2 diabetes that requires neither surgery, medication nor calorie restriction, but rather relies on adherence to a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, tracked by regular finger-stick checks of blood chemistry and guided remotely by a team of physicians, coaches and algorithms. That’s the premise of Virta Health, a San Francisco-based digital health company formed in 2014 ...

  • Alexa, tell me about my blood glucose: Health tech startup Wellpepper wins Alexa Diabetes Challenge

    The Sugarpod, winner of the Alexa Diabetes Challenge. The device is a scale and foot scanner that connects to an app and Alexa skill. (Wellpepper Photo) Type 2 Diabetes has become a health crisis in the U.S. The rate of type 2 diabetes has nearly doubled in the last twenty years and the disease is now among the top ten causes of death. Sadly, the problem is only going to get worse: The CDC has ...

  • Diabetes devices move from painful fingerpricks to slick tech

    Diabetes devices move from painful fingerpricks to slick tech This photo provided by Abbott Laboratories shows the company's FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitoring device. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the device, which continuously monitors diabetics blood sugar levels without requiring backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice dail ...

  • American Diabetes Association® Releases 2018 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, with Notable New Recommendations for People with Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    ARLINGTON, Va., Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Notable new recommendations in the 2018 edition of the American Diabetes Association's (ADA's) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes (Standards of Care) include advances in cardiovascular disease risk management including hypertension; an updated care algorithm that is patient-focused; the integration of new technology into diabetes management; and rout ...

  • Mastery in Diabetes Management: New Diabetes Diagnosis Criteria Req'd for Asian Patients?

    Nina Suda, MD Nina Suda, MD, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in New York, spoke with MedPage Today at AACE 2017, the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, about a case study involving a young Southeast Asian woman presenting with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and advanced diabetic nephropathy. Suda's full poster may be downl ...

  • Diabetes Diet: New Book ‘The End Of Diabetes’ Highlights Ways To Prevent And Reverse The Disease

    Diabetes is usually referred to as a lifelong, chronic disease, one that affects more than 20 million Americans. But now a new book claims that most diabetics can get off medication and become 100 percent healthy in just a few easy steps. In “The End of Diabetes,” Dr. Joel Fuhrman explains how one can prevent and reverse diabetes and its related symptoms, while losing weight at the same time. ...

  • Breakthrough pill can CURE diabetes: New drug fights both types of killer disease

    Handing hope to the millions of sufferers in the UK, the new study suggests that a “probiotic pill” - one containing live bacteria - can radically reduce blood glucose levels. In experiments researchers discovered that using a pill containing common bacteria found in the human gut can shift the control of glucose levels from the pancreas to the upper intestine. It is believed that this “rewi ...

Related Articles