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Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Its Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Diet

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Its Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Diet

Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Its Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & Diet

Not many people know that diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus are two different terms are not synonymous to each other. Diabetes insipidus is mainly caused due to the problems in the kidney and the main hormone responsible for the same is the anti diuretic hormone or the vasopressin. In this article, we shall deep dive and know more about one particular type of diabetes insipidus which is known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.
So, come and join in for the article “Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: Its Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Diet.”
What is Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus?
Diabetes Insipidus is a condition that is related to the inefficient functioning of the antidiuretic hormone produced by the hypothalamus. Whenever the body experiences any type of fluid loss, the antidiuretic hormone is released and allows the kidney to retain the water. However, in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the kidneys fail to respond appropriately to the hormone. Hence, the kidneys do not retain or absorb enough water and as a result, alarge volume of dilute urine is produced by the organ.
There are two main types of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus which is caused by several factors mostly related to the lifestyle of an individual and Hereditary nephrogenic diabetes insipidus which, as the name suggests, is a condition that is carried out through various gene mutations.
Causes of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus
The causes of the disease include:
Increased levels of calcium in the patient’s blood
Hypokalemia or extremely low levels of potassi Continue reading

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Fat loss from pancreas 'can reverse' effects of type-2 diabetes

Fat loss from pancreas 'can reverse' effects of type-2 diabetes

INDYPULSE
Fat loss from pancreas 'can reverse' effects of type-2 diabetes
Less than half a teaspoon of fat is all that it takes to turn someone into a type-2 diabetic according to a study that could overturn conventional wisdom on a disease affecting nearly 3 million people in Britain.
Researchers have found it is not so much the overall body fat that is important in determining the onset of type-2 diabetes but the small amount of fat deposited in the pancreas, the endocrine organ responsible for insulin production.
A clinical trial on 18 patients with type-2 diabetes has found that the loss of just one gram of fat from the pancreas can reverse the disease to the point where patients were once more are able to control levels of sugar in the bloodstream using their own insulin.
Diabetes comes in two forms. The “type-2” version affects about 90 per cent of the diabetic population and this is the disease associated with diet and obesity in adults. It occurs as a result of the failure of the body’s insulin hormone to control blood-sugar levels – by the pancreas not producing enough insulin, and the body becoming resistant to its own hormone.
If fat in the pancreas really is the key factor that triggers type-2 diabetes, it offers a potential target for reversing the disease through drugs. However, at present the only way of lowering fat levels in the pancreas is to go on a strict diet that lowers fat elsewhere in the body – a weight-loss procedure that is notoriously difficult to maintain.
Another problem is how we define “pancreatic fat”, according to Professor St Continue reading

Diet, Lifestyle, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women

Diet, Lifestyle, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women

Previous studies have examined individual dietary and lifestyle factors in relation to type 2 diabetes, but the combined effects of these factors are largely unknown.
We followed 84,941 female nurses from 1980 to 1996; these women were free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer at base line. Information about their diet and lifestyle was updated periodically. A low-risk group was defined according to a combination of five variables: a body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of less than 25; a diet high in cereal fiber and polyunsaturated fat and low in trans fat and glycemic load (which reflects the effect of diet on the blood glucose level); engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for at least half an hour per day; no current smoking; and the consumption of an average of at least half a drink of an alcoholic beverage per day.
During 16 years of follow-up, we documented 3300 new cases of type 2 diabetes. Overweight or obesity was the single most important predictor of diabetes. Lack of exercise, a poor diet, current smoking, and abstinence from alcohol use were all associated with a significantly increased risk of diabetes, even after adjustment for the body-mass index. As compared with the rest of the cohort, women in the low-risk group (3.4 percent of the women) had a relative risk of diabetes of 0.09 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.17). A total of 91 percent of the cases of diabetes in this cohort (95 percent confidence interval, 83 to 95 percent) could be attributed to habits and Continue reading

Diet Soda Intake and Risk of Incident Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)*

Diet Soda Intake and Risk of Incident Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)*

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We determined associations between diet soda consumption and risk of incident metabolic syndrome, its components, and type 2 diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Diet soda consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire at baseline (2000–2002). Incident type 2 diabetes was identified at three follow-up examinations (2002–2003, 2004–2005, and 2005–2007) as fasting glucose >126 mg/dl, self-reported type 2 diabetes, or use of diabetes medication. Metabolic syndrome (and components) was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CI for type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome components were estimated, adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and dietary confounders.
At least daily consumption of diet soda was associated with a 36% greater relative risk of incident metabolic syndrome and a 67% greater relative risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with nonconsumption (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.11–1.66] for metabolic syndrome and 1.67 [1.27–2.20] for type 2 diabetes). Of metabolic syndrome components, only high waist circumference (men ≥102 cm and women ≥88 cm) and high fasting glucose (≥100 mg/dl) were prospectively associated with diet soda consumption. Associations between diet soda consumption and type 2 diabetes were independent of baseline measures of adiposity or changes in these measures, whereas associations between diet soda and metabolic syndrome were not independent of these factors.
Although these observational data cannot establish Continue reading

Heat and Type 1 Diabetes

Heat and Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here.
Whether experiencing hot summer temperatures or a tropical vacation, it is important for everyone to beware of the heat – and the various effects that it can have on our bodies. Have you ever noticed your blood sugar either spiking or dropping rapidly in severe temperatures? Many people with Type 1 diabetes run into this issue and have been baffled as to why. Heat may have much more of an impact on your blood glucose levels than you realized! Keeping a close eye on your BG becomes even more important when in areas with higher temperatures.
Here are some possible explanations to the heat’s role in blood sugar fluctuations, and some factors to keep in mind while enjoying your summer fun in the sun with Type 1!
High blood sugar
Heat can spike blood sugar levels easily if we are not properly hydrated. When the body is dehydrated, blood glucose becomes more concentrated due to the decrease in blood flow through the kidneys. This makes it much more difficult for the kidneys to remove any excess glucose from urine.
How to fix it? Adjust insulin dosages as instructed by a medical professional, and most importantly drink plenty of water!
Low blood sugar
Blood glucose levels have been known to plummet in the heat – especially when combined with exercise. Why is this?
Heat can cause the body’s blood vessels to expand, which in turn can speed up insulin absorption and potentially lead to hypoglycemia. This can Continue reading

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