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Natural Treatment For Type I Diabetes – Possible Causes

Natural treatment for type I diabetes – Possible Causes

Natural treatment for type I diabetes – Possible Causes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes:
Article #1: Introduction To Type I Diabetes
Article #2: Possible Causes of Type 1 Diabetes (This Article)
Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes
Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes
By far the most common theory as to why type 1 diabetes forms is the destruction of the beta cells. There are several theories as to why this happens.
The generally accepted theory is that an “auto-immune” reaction of the body physically destroys the beta cells in the pancreas. In other words, abnormal proteins get into the blood and in the body's attempts to destroy the proteins the beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed.
There are theories (some with very sold evidence) as to why these proteins get into the body. The theories with the most scientific evidence revolve around vaccinations or milk (i.e. dairy products) as being the cause of the abnormal proteins entering the body and triggering the auto-immune reaction.
Vaccinations are known to get all kinds of deadly and damaging things directly into the bloodstream, including abnormal proteins (triggering many different kinds of auto-immune diseases), and a wide variety of very undesirable molecules into our bodies.
Impurities in a vaccine are injected directly into the body, bypassing the digestive system's ability to deal with them. If these unnatural proteins are similar enough to normal cells or beneficial proteins in the body, the immune system, in attacking the unnatural molecules, may be fooled and start attacking the natural cells or beneficial proteins. This may also lead to the Continue reading

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A Diabetes Link to Meat

A Diabetes Link to Meat

Right Now | Getting the Red out
[extra:Extra] Read more about Harvard’s “Healthy Eating Plate.”
Also:
Red-meat consumption is already linked to higher levels of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease (atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke). Now researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have added an increased risk of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes to that list. The incurable illness occurs when the body’s ability to control blood glucose levels by means of insulin secretion becomes impaired, either because of “insulin resistance” (when insulin fails to trigger effective glucose uptake by muscle or other tissues), or because production of insulin by beta cells in the pancreas declines.
The HSPH investigators, led by professor of epidemiology Frank Hu and research fellow An Pan, analyzed data from three longitudinal studies of male and female healthcare professionals who were followed for 14 to 28 years. After adjusting for other risk factors, the researchers found that a daily serving of red meat no larger than a deck of cards increased the risk of adult-onset diabetes by 19 percent. Processed red meat proved much worse: a daily serving half that size—one hot dog, or two slices of bacon, for example—was associated with a 51 percent increase in risk. (The average 10-year risk of getting diabetes for U.S. adults is around 10 percent.)
Why is red meat harmful? “Saturated fat, which can lead to cardiovascular disease, is really just the beginning of the story,” explains Hu. Even though it is “difficult to pinpoint one compound or ing Continue reading

The Truth About Red Meat and Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat and Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food.
Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively.
“Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations.
Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance.
Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat
When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths.
When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes caused by buildup of toxic fat, study suggests

Type 2 diabetes caused by buildup of toxic fat, study suggests

An overwhelming number of Americans live with diabetes, and many others with prediabetes. Although obesity is a risk factor for this condition, new research suggests it might only be a certain kind of fat that produces type 2 diabetes.
Over 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the United States population, live with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95 percent of all these cases.
In type 1 diabetes, patients do not produce enough of the hormone insulin. In type 2 diabetes, although the body produces insulin, it cannot use it properly.
Insulin is secreted by the pancreas when it detects sugar intake. Insulin enables cells to accept glucose, which is then processed by the cells and turned into energy.
In patients whose insulin is not administered effectively, glucose is not assimilated by the cells but instead builds up in the bloodstream. Diabetes occurs when levels of blood sugar are abnormally high.
Although being overweight or obese is a common risk factor for diabetes, researchers have pointed out that diabetes can still occur in people of a healthy weight.
Previous research has found that 12 percent of people diagnosed with diabetes between 1990-2011 were at normal weight. The same research indicates that once diagnosed, normal-weight participants were more likely to die from diabetes than their heavier counterparts.
Reasons for this were unknown, until now. New research may have shed light on not only why people of a healthy weight are still prone to type 2 diabetes, but also why some people Continue reading

CDC's new 'pre-diabetes' campaign is misguided, Mayo physician says

CDC's new 'pre-diabetes' campaign is misguided, Mayo physician says

In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Medical Association, in partnership with the Ad Council, launched a new campaign to increase the public’s awareness of pre-diabetes.
According to the CDC, some 86 million American adults may have pre-diabetes, which the agency says is characterized by “blood glucose (sugar) levels [that] are higher than normal — but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.”
“Pre-diabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke,” says Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, in a video released on MedScape with the campaign. Indeed, Albright says that without treatment — “a structured lifestyle program that provides real-life support for healthful eating, increasing physical activity, and enhancing problem-solving skills” — some 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-fledged diabetes within five years.
The campaign is encouraging people to talk with their physicians about getting tested for pre-diabetes.
Diabetes is certainly a serious disease. It can lead to disabling and sometimes life-threatening health complications, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have the disease — a number that has increased four-fold over the past three decades.
But many experts are not convinced that pre-diabetes, a term coined by the ADA a few years ago and used almost exclus Continue reading

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