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Natural Remedies For Type 2 Diabetes

Natural Remedies for Type 2 Diabetes

Natural Remedies for Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a condition that affects over 12 percent of adults in America. It is sometimes referred to as non-insulin dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes. This condition affects the way that the body uses sugar. It occurs when the body either does not produce enough insulin, or the body is resistant to insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar.
There are a number of symptoms that a person may experience if he or she has type 2 diabetes, none of which should be ignored. Some of those symptoms include weight loss, fatigue, increased hunger, and slow-healing infections.
There are a variety of factors that can lead to type 2 diabetes. Some of those factors include inactivity, excess body weight, and family history. People who have pre-diabetes, which is a condition where the blood sugar is elevated but not high enough to be classified as diabetic, often develop type 2 diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition, but it can be managed. To supplement the necessary medication diabetics must take, you may also want to consider these natural remedies.
Natural Remedies for Diabetes
Avocado
Avocados are one of the healthiest foods that you can eat if you are a diabetic. They have monounsaturated fat and low in carbohydrates. Studies have shown that a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in monounsaturated fat can help improve insulin sensitivity.
Not only does the monounsaturated fat help improve insulin sensitivity, but it also helps reduce the risk of heart disease. Diabetics are at an increased risk for heart disease. There are several ways that you c Continue reading

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Diabetes-Friendly Pumpkin Cheesecake

Diabetes-Friendly Pumpkin Cheesecake

Serves 12
Ingredients
2 cups ground nuts (almond or pecan recommended)
1 1/4 cups Splenda (or other sugar substitute), divided
6 Tbsp butter, melted
24 ounces (three 8-ounce packages) cream cheese, softened
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 Tbsp sour cream
1 Tbsp pumpkin pie spice
4 eggs + 1 egg yolk, room temperature
1 (15-ounce) can pumpkin puree
Preparation
Preheat oven to 350 F.
Mix ground nuts, 1/4 cup Splenda, and butter in a bowl. Press crust mixture into the bottom of a springform pan, and bake for 20 minutes.
Lower the oven temperature to 300 F.
Using an electric mixer, combine the cream cheese and 1 cup of Splenda on medium speed. Add vanilla, sour cream, and pumpkin pie spice, then combine until smoothly mixed.
Add the eggs and egg yolk one at a time, combining into the mixture on low speed.
Fold pumpkin into the batter until blended. Do not over mix.
Gently add the pumpkin batter to the pan over the cooked crust.
Place the pan on a large piece of aluminum foil, and fold the foil around the sides and top of the pan to keep water out. Fill a larger pan or dish halfway with water, and place the aluminum-wrapped pan into the water bath.
Bake for 1 hour, then reduce the heat to 200 F and continue to bake for 1 more hour.
Turn oven off and allow cheesecake to completely cool inside the oven. It can be left overnight to cool.
Remove the cheesecake gently from the pan, and let it sit in the refrigerator for several hours, or overnight.
Nutritional Information per Serving
310.9 Calories
27.8 g Fat
155.1 mg Cholesterol
260.3 mg Sodium
10.7 g Carbohydrate
0.2 g Fiber
6.1 g Protein
S Continue reading

Lucozade is changing its formula and Irish people with diabetes have been warned that they need to take care

Lucozade is changing its formula and Irish people with diabetes have been warned that they need to take care

THE Lucozade formula is changing soon and Irish people diabetes have been warned.
Many Irish people have been recommended to drink Lucozade Energy Original when their blood glucose is low.
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But they need to be aware that the formulation of the drink is changing from April 2017 and it won’t be advertised on the bottle.
Lucozade Energy Original will now contain around 50 per cent less glucose-based carbohydrates so the amount needed to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycaemia, will change.
Hypoglycaemia, often referred to as a ‘hypo’, can be a side-effect of insulin and taking some diabetes medications.
The total number of people living with diabetes in Ireland is estimated to be 225,840.
People with Type 1 diabetes account for approximately 14,000 – 16,000 of the total diabetes population in Ireland i.e. 10-15% of the population of people living with diabetes
A Diabetes Ireland spokesperson said: “A blood glucose level below 4mmol/L is considered hypoglycaemia and if you have frequent low blood glucose levels, you should talk to your doctor as your medication may need to be reduced.
“If you are concerned about whether this affects you, check with your pharmacist or doctor/diabetes team to see if any of your diabetes medications puts you at risk of a low blood glucose.”
The spokesperson for Diabetes Ireland added: “It is important that formulation changes in products such as Lucozade are communicated widely to the diabetes community and also to all health professionals involved in their care.”
Irish Sun Online reached out to Lucozade Ireland today for commen Continue reading

Diabetes Alert Dogs: How Do They Do It?

Diabetes Alert Dogs: How Do They Do It?

Diabetes alert dogs are trained to warn diabetics when their blood sugar levels are changing, giving them time to make adjustments before it's too late.
Alert dogs learn to detect shifts in our glucose using their sense of smell. Having up to 300 million scent glands, they can distinguish subtle alterations in human body odors that scientists call volatile organic compounds, or VOCs.
What Alert Dogs Smell
VOCs are partly a signature blend of chemicals emitted by the bacteria living within us and on our skin. Our personal VOC scent also includes compounds thrown off when molecules in our body break down to create energy. We leak these odors into the air through our breath and skin.
Changes in a person’s blood sugar level alters his or her VOCs. It is these VOC changes that dogs can be trained to detect – and the training is rigorous. Although dogs have noses that know VOCs, they must learn to distinguish the smell of past and present VOC variations, and to notice the glucose changes in a variety of environments.
Alert Dog Training
A dog in diabetes alert training first undergoes scent discrimination lessons. They learn what hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) smells like and must discern it from other competing, and sometimes enticing, odors in the air.
Once they have basic scent detection down, dogs master more advanced skills:
People with diabetes carry the smell of earlier hypoglycemic episodes on their clothing, carpeting, and furnishings. Alert dogs need to distinguish the “dead” scent of previous episodes from the smell of an occurring episode.
Because assistance do Continue reading

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Sugar has no part of causing Type 1 diabetes. That form of diabetes has multiple causes, probably including genetics and certainly including elements we don't yet understand.
Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, frequently occurs in overweight patients. In fact, the most common comorbidity in diabetes is obesity.
But consuming sugar is not the only cause of obesity, and consuming sugar as a limited part of a well-designed diabetes meal plan will not cause harm to the diabetic patient.
Sugar Is a Carbohydrate
Sugar is a carbohydrate. So is starch and so is fiber. While sugar and starch tend to digest and hit the blood stream quickly, fiber takes longer through the digestive process, thereby causing a more muted effect on blood sugar levels.
The recommended diet for diabetics encourages food from all food groups. The trick is balance. With a controlled amount of carbohydrates as part of a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables and proteins, along with a limited quantity of fat, blood sugar levels can be maintained in a healthy way.
Sugar as Part of the Diabetic Diet
The trick with including sugar in the diet is to make sure you are getting the biggest nutrition bang you can from it. The diabetic diet is primarily counting and balancing carbs, so that the quantity of carbs consumed is fairly even throughout the day and keeps blood sugar levels in balance.
Those who are accustomed to following a diabetic diet have become proficient in making healthy substitutions. For instance, instead of drinking an 8 ounce glass of soda, with its 24 grams of sugar and no nutritional value, Continue reading

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