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Natural Herbs For Diabetes: 5 Natural Remedies For Diabetes That Work!

Natural Herbs For Diabetes: 5 Natural Remedies For Diabetes That Work!

Natural Herbs For Diabetes: 5 Natural Remedies For Diabetes That Work!


Natural herbs for diabetes have been a hot topic for as long as I can remember. It only makes sense when you consider that some of the most used drugs come from natural substances like herbs or a tree bark or something like that.
While natural remedies for diabetes can help, it is important to know that all of the herbs in the world wont help if you dont make an adjustment in your lifestyle. This is one of the big reasons for type 2 diabetes or uncontrolled diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease. ..
When your pancreas slows down and there are a number of other defects that start to affect your body, your ability to regulate sugar effectively decreases.
It all starts with what you eat and your level of activity. Sedentary lifestyles with a poor diet tend to cause diabetes and make diabetes worse over time.
In this article, Im going to share with you 5 little-known natural herbs for diabetes. All of these are based on science from real clinical trials with references below.
I will also share with you studies to back them up, and some recommended products.
Also, stay with me because Ill share with you at the end what I believe is the best resource in this area for type 2 diabetes. So sit tight here we go
But before I get to it, Im not a doctor and dont know your medical situation, so prior to using any of this information consult with your physician. And Im not associated with any of these products that I may provide here, I just thought it would be easier for you to take action if I provided some product.
Nigella sativa also called black seed or black cumi Continue reading

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Q&A: Understanding the link between diabetes, mental health disorders

Q&A: Understanding the link between diabetes, mental health disorders


Q&A: Understanding the link between diabetes, mental health disorders
Adolescents with common health conditions, such as diabetes, asthma and obesity, are at a higher risk for depression and major depressive episodes, compared to their peers without these conditions, according to a new report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
Among all adolescents, there has been a significant rise in the overall rates of major depressive episodes from 8.8% in 2005 to 12.5% in 2015, according to data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administrations (SAMHSA) National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The survey also revealed that between 2005 and 2014, one in seven adolescents with diabetes experienced a major depressive episode within the past year, compared with one in 11 adolescents without diabetes.
National Childrens Mental Health Awareness Day is observed this year on May 4 to highlight the importance of integrating behavioral health and primary care for children, adolescents and young adults with mental and/or substance disorders, according to a press release.
What is the connection between physical and mental health in youth?
We strive to promote comprehensive well-being for youth, including both physical health and mental health. When youth are sick or physically dont feel well, this can influence their mood and mental health. However, when youth are struggling with mood or mental health symptoms, this can also affect their physical health and their behavior related to caring for their health. For this years National Childrens Continue reading

Olive oil in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and intervention trials

Olive oil in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and intervention trials


Olive oil in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and intervention trials
2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
1Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany
2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna,, Vienna, Austria
*Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, Nuthetal 14558, Germany. E-mail: [email protected]
Received 2016 Oct 26; Revised 2017 Jan 25; Accepted 2017 Feb 2.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included Continue reading

Mental Health Care in Pediatric Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges and Barriers

Mental Health Care in Pediatric Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges and Barriers


Mental Health Care in Pediatric Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges and Barriers
Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > June 2017 Published on: June 21, 2017
Mental Health Care in Pediatric Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges and Barriers
The American Diabetes Association recently recognized the important role that psychosocial care plays in diabetes management. Addressing behavioral health needs at all stages of development in youth with diabetes is critical.
The financial burden of poorly controlled diabetes in childhood and adolescence is not fully evident until complications occur during adulthood. In 2010, researchers estimated that the annual cost of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the United States was $14.4 billion, including medical costs and lost income.1Prevention of diabetes-related complications requires that providers who care for children and adolescents with diabetes address barriers to good control soon after diagnosis and at frequent intervals as patients progress developmentally.
As a self-management disease, diabetes requires patients to adjust their insulin regimens based on blood glucose patterns they have recognized (in relation to exercise, illness, type of foods eaten, etc). This requires the synthesis of information from different sources and depends upon cognitive function and attention to detail. Even with the most advanced technology (insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, and hybrid closed loop systems), neurodevelopmental and behavioral issues can interfere with a childs ability to master diabetes self-management skills.2
Prevalence of Mental Hea Continue reading

Diagnostic accuracy of resting systolic toe pressure for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in people with and without diabetes: a cross-sectional retrospective case-control study

Diagnostic accuracy of resting systolic toe pressure for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in people with and without diabetes: a cross-sectional retrospective case-control study

Abstract
The resting systolic toe pressure (TP) is a measure of small arterial function in the periphery. TP is used in addition to the ankle-brachial index when screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limb in those with diabetes, particularly in the presence of lower limb medial arterial calcification. It may be used as an adjunct assessment of lower limb vascular function and as a predictor of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of TP for detecting PAD in people with and without diabetes.
This was a retrospective case-control study. Two researchers extracted information from consecutive patient records, including TP measurements, colour Duplex ultrasound results, demographic information, and medical history. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were determined by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios.
Three hundred and nintey-four participants with suspected PAD were included. In the diabetes group (n = 176), ROC analysis of TP for detecting PAD was 0.78 (95%CI: 0.69 to 0.84). In the control group (n = 218), the ROC of TP was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.70 to 0.80). TP had highest sensitivity when anatomical distribution of disease was both proximal and distal (diabetes group: 79.49%, the control group: 82.61%). TP yielded highest sensitivity in mild disease (50–75% stenosis) in diabetes group, (81.82%) and moderate disease (>75% stenosis) in control group (80.77%).
Our findings indicate that TPs are useful to assist in diagnosing PAD Continue reading

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