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More Proof A Low-calorie Diet Can Effectively Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

More proof a low-calorie diet can effectively reverse type 2 diabetes

More proof a low-calorie diet can effectively reverse type 2 diabetes

In early November, we reported how a team at Yale University had uncovered the key metabolic mechanisms responsible for lowering blood glucose concentrations in those on a very low calorie diet. Now a new study published in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet is offering more evidence to support the theory that type 2 diabetes can be effectively cured through intensive dieting and weight management.
The latest study, conducted by a team led by researchers at the University of Glasgow, has successfully demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can indeed be reversed through a weight management program alone. The study found nearly half of all participants had reverted to, and maintained, a non-diabetic state without using antidiabetic medications, one year after undergoing the program.
"Our findings suggest that even if you have had type 2 diabetes for six years, putting the disease into remission is feasible," says Michael Lean, who co-led the study. "In contrast to other approaches, we focus on the need for long-term maintenance of weight loss through diet and exercise and encourage flexibility to optimize individual results."
The trial followed 298 adults over two years. Half the participants underwent the new weight management program, while the other half served as a control group following general best-practice diabetic treatments. The weight management program comprised of the subjects withdrawing from all anti-diabetic drugs and undergoing a total diet replacement. For three to five months each participant consumed a formula diet adding up to around 800 calories per d Continue reading

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Diabetes rises with daily soda -- including diet soda -- consumption

Diabetes rises with daily soda -- including diet soda -- consumption

A comprehensive study of European adults has found that compared with people who drink a single sugar-sweetened drink daily, those who drink water, coffee or tea instead are at 14% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
The research found that drinking sugar-sweetened milk products was an even more powerful driver of diabetes; compared with those who drank one such beverage daily, people who drank water, coffee or tea instead were on average 20% to 25% less likely to develop diabetes.
The British study, which tracked the consumption habits of more than 25,000 Britons (ages 40 to 79) over about 11 years, offered little comfort to drinkers of artificially sweetened beverages. While consumers of coffee, tea and water had a diminished risk of diabetes, the study found consumers of diet sodas to have type 2 diabetes risks on par with drinkers of sugar-sweetened beverages.
But when the authors took body mass index and waist circumference into account, they found that consumption of diet beverages was not linked to higher rates of diabetes. This suggests that diet soda drinkers are already more likely to be overweight or obese, and that this - rather than their diet soda consumption - might account for their elevated diabetes risk.
While offering some insights into different beverages' contribution to diabetes rates, the study does not test the likely effects of changing established consumption patterns and substituting one kind of drink for another. Instead, it tracked the consumption patterns of a large population over a lengthy period of time to see who was more or less like Continue reading

The cure for type II diabetes

The cure for type II diabetes

If you are already on insulin, absolutely do not stop taking insulin, and do not stop measuring your glucose levels, without your doctor's permission.
Surprisingly, medical researchers, such as from Medical News Today, consider Type 2 diabetes to be an immune problem whereby the immune system attacks the body's own cells.
Type 2 diabetes is in the process of being redefined as an autoimmune disease rather than just a metabolic disorder, said an author of a new study published in Nature Medicine this week, the findings of which may lead to new diabetes treatments that target the immune system instead of trying to control blood sugar.

The researchers believe that insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes (unlike type 1 diabetes where it is the insulin-producing cells that are destroyed), is the result of B cells and other immune cells attacking the body's own tissues.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/222766.php
This discovery is nothing new to some natural medicine researchers. Treatments that do the things necessary to build the immune system have been curing type 2 diabetes for years.
Some of these treatments are “electromedicine” treatments which use gentle electrical waves to do the things necessary to rebuild the immune system.
But these gentle electrical waves do not directly build the immune system, rather they remove the “root cause” of why the immune system is dysfunctional in the first place.
Think of the school bully. Instead of fixing the students he beats up every week, the school might just kick the bully out of school. By doing thi Continue reading

Diabetes in Dogs (Diabetes Mellitus)

Diabetes in Dogs (Diabetes Mellitus)

Diabetes in dogs is a common disorder and is similar to juvenile diabetes in people in which the pancreas cannot produce sufficient amount of insulin. This page looks at the symptoms, health risks, and treatment of this disease. It also discusses how to use some natural remedies such as herbs and supplements to help dogs with diabetes.
Diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) is a common autoimmune disorder in both cats and dogs. Pets that are obese, as well as neutered male cats and unspayed female dogs are more prone to the disease. Most dogs that have diabetes are between 7 to 9 years old, although it can occur to very young dogs as well.
Sugar diabetes is divided into Type I and Type II.
Type I diabetes (similar to juvenile diabetes in people) occurs when the body attacks the pancreatic cells that make insulin. When your dog's body does not have enough insulin, the body is unable to properly utilize or store blood sugar, resulting in increased sugar levels. The excessive sugar spills over into the urine and is removed from the body. As a result, the body tissues do not have enough blood sugar to sustain a consistent energy level. This is the most common form of diabetes in dogs and is frequently referred to as insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM).
In type II diabetes mellitus, insulin is still produced, but it is either not adequately produced, or the cells are not as sensitive to it as they should be. If the cells are not sensitive enough, then even though insulin is present, glucose cannot enter the cells. Type II diabetes is associated with obesity, and in many cases can be c Continue reading

Drinking moderately linked to lower diabetes risk

Drinking moderately linked to lower diabetes risk

Drinking three to four times a week has been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than never drinking, Danish researchers suggest.
Wine appears to be particularly beneficial, probably as it plays a role in helping to manage blood sugar, the study, published in Diabetologia, says.
They surveyed more than 70,000 people on their alcohol intake - how much and how often they drank.
But experts said this wasn't a "green light" to drink more than recommended.
And Public Health England warned that consuming alcohol contributed to a vast number of other serious diseases, including some cancers, heart and liver disease.
"People should keep this in mind when thinking about how much they drink," a spokeswoman said.
'Better effect'
Prof Janne Tolstrup, from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark, who led the research, said: "We found that drinking frequency has an independent effect from the amount of alcohol taken.
"We can see it's a better effect to drink the alcohol in four portions rather than all at once."
After around five years, study participants were followed up and a total of 859 men and 887 women group had developed diabetes - either type 1 or the more common type 2.
The researchers concluded that drinking moderately three to four times a week was linked to a 32% reduced risk of diabetes in women, and 27% in men, compared with people drinking on less than one day a week.
Findings also suggest that not all types of alcohol had the same effect.
Wine appeared to be particularly beneficial because polyphenols, particularly in red wine, Continue reading

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