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More Evidence Of Link Between Statins And Diabetes

More Evidence of Link Between Statins and Diabetes

More Evidence of Link Between Statins and Diabetes

The use of statin drugs has already been associated with over 300 adverse health effects, and now, a new study has found that long-term statin use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 30 percent in high-risk individuals. The discovery is the latest in the body of research that raises doubt about the safety of the popular cholesterol drugs.
In the new study, scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, NY, examined data on more than 3,200 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program. The individuals had a weight problem and were at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Blood fats and blood pressure were measured yearly, and blood glucose was tested every six months. Statin use was monitored.
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At the onset, 4 percent of the participants took statins, but the percentage rose to 33 percent after 10 years. Most of the individuals were on a regimen of atorvastatin or simvastatin.
Statins Increased Diabetes Risk 30 Percent in High Risk People
Statin use was linked to a 36-percent higher risk of receiving a type-2 diabetes diagnosis. The percentage dropped to 30 percent after adjustments were ma Continue reading

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7 Silent Symptoms of Diabetes That You Need to Know

7 Silent Symptoms of Diabetes That You Need to Know

Diabetes a metabolic disease that inhibits the body to produce or respond to insulin the way it is meant to. This results in abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates and raised blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels stay high because the body does not release the much-needed hormone, insulin. Depending on what factors are causing the raised blood sugar level, diabetes can be diagnosed as either type 1 or type 2.
American Diabetes Association statistics show that a stunning 25% of people with type 2 diabetes don’t even know they have it.
Normally during digestion, the body is able to turn foods into glucose. The blood then distributes the glucose to the body’s cells. This is when insulin typically steps in to convert glucose into energy for the cells to either use or store. The process of converting food into energy is vital, as the body depends on proper fuel for every process and action it goes through each day. When insulin is ineffective, the bloodstream’s glucose cannot be converted into energy in the cells. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood, which leads to the high glucose levels that define diabetes.
Criteria for Diabetes
If the blood glucose level is over 200 mg/dl, diabetes is diagnosed.
If the blood glucose level is over 140 mg/dl two hours following a meal, pre-diabetes is concluded.
If the blood glucose level after sleeping or fasting for eight hours is over 126 mg/dl, diabetes is diagnosed.
If the blood glucose level after sleeping or fasting for eight hours is over 108 mg/dl, pre-diabetes is concluded.
Type 1 Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is the less com Continue reading

Preventing Diabetes: Small Changes Have Big Payoff

Preventing Diabetes: Small Changes Have Big Payoff

If it's hard to imagine how small differences in lifestyle can make a big difference in your health, consider this story of identical twins Tim and Paul Daly. They shared almost everything in childhood, including the same eating habits, the same love of basketball and the same genes — some of which predispose them to diabetes.
Back in 1996, one of the twins was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.
"When you first get diagnosed, it's like a punch in the stomach," says Paul Daly, who is now 60.
Or it's a wake-up call — if you're the identical twin. Since the disease runs in families, it seemed almost a certainty that Tim would develop it, too.
"Because we know that Type 2 is genetic disease, and since he has an identical twin, he has a risk that's about 95 percent," says diabetes expert Dr. David Nathan of Massachusetts General Hospital.
But 14 years later, Tim still does not have diabetes. And he doesn't take any medicine to keep his blood sugar down. Instead, he has been able to make small changes to his eating habits and exercise to keep diabetes at bay. He isn't alone — a large national study conducted at 27 sites around the country, including Massachusetts General Hospital, found that small lifestyle changes are far more successful at warding off diabetes than a drug.
Overweight And At Risk
Both Daly brothers had gained weight in middle age. It's just that one gained more than the other. In 1996, when he was diagnosed with diabetes, Paul weighed 220 pounds — too much for his 5-foot-10-inch frame. Looking back, Paul says he hadn't stuck with much regular exercise.
By c Continue reading

How to reverse diabetes and lose 93 pounds without hunger

How to reverse diabetes and lose 93 pounds without hunger

What an amazing transformation. Peter struggled for a long time with his weight – he had to give up every possible diet because of always feeling hungry. Instead he got type 2 diabetes, at the age of just 32. And the advice he got just made it worse.
Finally in desperation he searched for other options on google. He found this site and others. Here’s what happened:
The Email
Hello Andreas,
First of all I would like to thank you for all you are doing. The information you and others share were life saving for me.
My name is Peter Szombati and I live in Transylvania, Romania and this is my story. I was a normal-weight child and had normal weight until my early 20s’ (about 185 lbs, 85 kg). Then I started to work at a place were I had to sit a lot and started to ignore homemade food and opted for fast food and soft drinks.
From 185 lbs (85 kg) in my early 20s’, I went to 309 lbs (140 kg) at 25. It didn’t get any better even though I have tried every possible diet. I always lost some weight but put it all back on in the next months because I was always hungry.
Eventually, when I turned 32, my blood results showed I was a type 2 diabetic. I was always tired, was sweating a lot, was always thirsty etc. My doctor gave me a “type 2 diabetic” guide book. I still have it today, even though it is rubbish. The first picture you see when you open the book is that stupid food pyramide.
Anyway, I started to live like the food pyramide says (no more coca cola, but orange juice, whole grain breads, low-fat stuff) and my diabetes got worse, I got fatter and more tired than I was Continue reading

WellDoc partners with American Diabetes Educators Association to add more educational content

WellDoc partners with American Diabetes Educators Association to add more educational content

WellDoc announced today a partnership with the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), a professional membership organization of over 14,000 diabetes educators. WellDoc will incorporate educational content from AADE into its FDA-cleared, reimburseable BlueStar system for diabetes management.
"We were able to build a curriculum that will be able to be delivered in a contextually guided way for our users built off the AADE materials," WellDoc Chief Marketing Officer Tara Charvat told MobiHealthNews. "It’s a beautiful add-on and it’s really a great way for patients to get a more guided curriculum to help them with the self-management of their condition about and beyond the realtime feedback and the other coaching methods that we’ve built on that platform."
WellDoc's BlueStar analyzes patient data, compares the data to past trends, and sends analytics to the patient’s healthcare team. The program is supported by motivational messages, behavioral coaching, and educational content, delivered right to the patient's mobile device. BlueStar is known for being the first reimbursable digital therapeutic.
Through the partnership, BlueStar users will have information delivered to them based on AADE's seven primary areas of self-management: Healthy Eating, Being Active, Monitoring, Taking Medication, Problem Solving, Reducing Risks and Healthy Coping. Educational materials will be re-worked for a digital format, with "bite-sized" lessons being delivered to patients at the moments when they'll have the most impact.
“Digital health is a strong complement to in-person c Continue reading

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