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Metformin Improves Overall Survival Of Colorectal Cancer Patients With Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

Metformin Improves Overall Survival of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

Metformin Improves Overall Survival of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis


Metformin Improves Overall Survival of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis
Correspondence should be addressed to Li Song and Wenyue Wang
Received 5 September 2016; Accepted 9 January 2017; Published 8 February 2017
Copyright 2017 Fanqiang Meng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Introduction. Diabetic population has a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality than nondiabetics. The role of metformin in CRC prognosis is still controversial. The meta-analysis aims to investigate whether metformin improves the survival of diabetic CRC patients. Methods. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched till July 1, 2016. Cohort studies were included. All articles were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Hazard Ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each study were calculated and pooled HRs with corresponding 95% CIs were generated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results. We included seven cohort studies with a medium heterogeneity (
) in our meta-analysis. An improved overall survival (OS) for metformin users over nonusers among colorectal cancers with diabetes was noted (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87). However, metformin reveals no benefits for cancer-specific survival (HR 0.79, 95%, CI 0.58 to 1.08). Conclusions. Metformin prolongs the OS of diabetic CRC patients, but it does n Continue reading

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Diabetes–the top things you can do.

Diabetes–the top things you can do.

This is one of the things that goes with food. Particularly in countries with great cooking traditions, which I am inclined to think goes hand in hand with Catholic culture because of these reasons: first, people are typically fun-loving and fun to be with and savor plenty of festivities and family events to celebrate and secondly, they are not averse to layering/combining/enriching flavors. For this is what I have noticed in truly good Catholic art–food, architecture, literature etc. It draws on more than one layers of meaning, source, nuance, style, symbolism. When Catholic design great, graphic artist Massimo Vignelli wrote to the Vatican proposing a redesign of the Vatican coat-of-arms suggesting a simple minimalist stark cross symbol, the Vatican in typical diplomatic fashion simply answered him in silence. Because though a faithful Catholic drawing lots of students for his kindness and generosity (his obits are effusive) he may have missed an essence of the Catholic spirit. It is Catholic. Wide-embracing, far-reaching, deep and enduring. So meaning is not only for the now, but for forever. It seeks to delight as well as to instruct. It is not pared down but so rich in power. The Word after all has Christological, eschatological (church), moral (personal) and literal meanings. So food in the Catholic style would have to be, not the three-simple-ingredient fare (which my husband had banned me for rightful reasons), but for meals that without breaking the bank would have possibly another counter flavor of cheese, spice, earthy tones, savory hints aside from the main on Continue reading

Positive or Negative Language Can Influence Your Diabetes Control

Positive or Negative Language Can Influence Your Diabetes Control


Positive or Negative Language Can Influence Your Diabetes Control
Posted by Roberta Kleinman | Jul 19, 2017 | Diabetes Management , Newsletters | 3 |
Proper wording can have a huge influence on the interpretation of the dialogue and further discussion in most conversations, especially when they concern diabetes. Words are powerful and cant be retracted once said. Words can shape feelings and attitudes and may even cause discrimination. The Diatribe Foundation created a language toolkit hoping that certain words when related to people with diabetes would empower them instead of using words that cause anxiety, disappointment, depression and frustration. Diatribe is a patient focused online publication which is part of the Diatribe Foundation. It offers all patients with diabetes the latest cutting-edge information. The Foundations mission is to improve the lives of people with diabetes.
Powerful and appropriate words can enable the patient to feel engaged, supported, helped and motivated which is an extremely important aspect of diabetes self-management. Spoken, negative language can and will affect relationships with our family, friends, working associates as well as your physicians and health care team. Which words can be positive or influential as opposed to offering negative connotations when it comes to diabetes? Lets take a look:
Patients are not diabetic and should be considered PWD or people with diabetes. Anyone who has diabetes knows there are so many more aspects to them than just diabetes. They are a complete person with diabetes.
When patients think of the Continue reading

How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes

How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes


How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes
Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area.
How Positive Self-Talk Can Help You Manage Type 2 Diabetes
The way you talk to yourself can have a big impact on how you think and feel about managing type 2 diabetes.
Medically Reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD
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Self-talk is a conversation that you have with yourself, either in your mind or out loud. Saying positive things to yourself can help boost your mood, get you through challenges, and even help you better manage type 2 diabetes .
But self-talk isnt always positive; it can be negative too. Negative thinking can start a cycle that makes diabetes management really challenging, says Alicia McAuliffe Fogarty, PhD, clinical psychologist and vice president of the Lifestyle Management Team at the American Diabetes Association (ADA).
There are many challenges associated with managing type 2 diabetes. Its common for people who have trouble managing the condition to fall into negative thinking patterns. Approximately 46 percent of people with type 2 diabetes experience negative thinking around managing the condition, according to a study published in Diabetic Medicine in June 2013.
D Continue reading

Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It

Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It


Reversing Diabetes Through Diet Changes: How One Woman Did It
After a bicycle accident, one woman was forced to change her diet, and she shares how her lifestyle tweaks helped her put diabetes in remission and how shes happier for it.
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Zelda Robinson, a radio-show host turned motivational speaker, helped put diabetes in remission by trading packaged snacks for fresh fruits and veggies.
Zelda Robinson lost two of her older siblings to type 2 diabetes and one to heart disease. But neither her familys history of diabetes nor her own prediabetes diagnosis could convince the Chicago native to make her health a priority.
In my [family] we all ate junk food and fast food. Every now and then on Thanksgiving we would have a real sit-down dinner with fresh food, says Robinson, who still lives in Chi-town and is a media consultant, author, and motivational speaker. Otherwise, I was living on Lays potato chips. And I used to eat Garretts popcorn two or three times a week I was hooked on the mixed cheddar cheese and caramel.
Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDE, is the owner and president of CBR Nutrition Enterprises, a nutrition consulting and counseling service in Massapequa, New York. She has not treated Robinson but regularly works with African-Americans diagnosed with diabetes, like Robinson. Brown-Riggs, who is also the author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes , points out that while di Continue reading

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