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Meat Intake And Insulin Resistance In Women Without Type 2 Diabetes

Meat Intake and Insulin Resistance in Women without Type 2 Diabetes

Meat Intake and Insulin Resistance in Women without Type 2 Diabetes


Meat Intake and Insulin Resistance in Women without Type 2 Diabetes
1Department of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, 237 SFH, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2Department of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, 269 SFH, Provo, UT 84602, USA
3Department of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, 267 SFH, Provo, UT 84602, USA
Received 2015 Mar 11; Revised 2015 Jun 19; Accepted 2015 Jun 21.
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Purpose. To examine the relationship between meat intake and insulin resistance (IR) in 292 nondiabetic women. Methods. IR was evaluated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Diet was assessed via 7-day weighed food records. Servings of very lean meat (VLM) and regular meat (meat) were indexed using the ADA Exchange Lists Program. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and body fat was measured using the Bod Pod. Results. Meat intake was directly related to HOMA (F = 7.4; P = 0.007). Women with moderate or high meat intakes had significantly higher HOMA levels than their counterparts. Adjusting for body fat weakened the relationship (F = 1.0; P = 0.3201). Odds ratio results showed that the low meat quartile had 67% lower odds of being IR (75th percentile) compared to their counterparts (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.160.71). These findings changed little after adjusting for all covariates sim Continue reading

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Foot Care when Traveling (For People with Diabetes)

Foot Care when Traveling (For People with Diabetes)

Why is foot care important for people who have diabetes?
When you have diabetes, taking good care of your feet is important — especially when traveling. Poor foot care can lead to serious problems.
Whether your trip includes skiing, touring city streets, walking sandy beaches, or making business presentations, you will probably spend a lot of time on your feet. This can increase the risk of foot problems.
Following the guidelines in this article will help you keep your feet healthy while you’re traveling so that you can enjoy your trip.
What should I do before I leave home?
Being well-prepared before you leave for your trip will help prevent problems. Follow these guidelines:
Talk to your doctor about your trip. Ask your doctor how you should care for your feet while you are traveling.
Write down your doctor’s phone number and a current medication list. Keep this information with you in your carry-on bag, purse, or wallet. This information will be helpful if you need to see a doctor away from home.
Wear medical identification that states you have diabetes.
What should I pack?
1. Comfortable shoes:
Break in stiff, new shoes before you leave for your trip to avoid foot irritation.
Plan to wear dress shoes or high-heeled shoes only when necessary.
Bring at least two pairs of shoes so you can switch pairs often. Changing shoes helps prevent blisters and sore pressure points.
2. Comfortable socks:
Socks with padding will protect troublesome pressure points.
Socks made with natural fibers, including cotton and wool, will keep moisture away from your skin and will protect yo Continue reading

Metformin Found Safe in Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Metformin Found Safe in Pregnant Women With Diabetes


Metformin Found Safe in Pregnant Women With Diabetes
Adverse outcomes tied to diabetes, not the drug
by Jeff Minerd Jeff Minerd, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today
This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and:
Note that this observational study suggests that women who take metformin during pregnancy have no increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, beyond those that arise through the presence of diabetes.
Be aware that the authors did not analyze a group of women with diabetes but not treated with metformin.
Pregnant women who took metformin for pregestational diabetes had a higher risk for adverse outcomes, but this risk was linked to the diabetes, not the drug, researchers reported.
Pregnant women on metformin for other indications, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), had no significantly increased risk for poor outcomes, Alice Panchaud, PhD, of the University of Geneva in Switzerland, and colleagues wrote online in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology .
Compared with a matched reference group of pregnant women not taking metformin, metformin users with diabetes were nearly four times more likely to give birth to an infant with major birth defects (odds ratio 3.95; 95% CI 1.77 to 9.41). However, there was no significantly increased risk for pregnant women on metformin for other reasons (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.18 to 2.81), the study found.
Similarly, women taking metformin for pre-gestational diabetes had more than twice the risk for spontaneous abortion or stillbirth (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.44 to 4.36), but women taking metformin for othe Continue reading

WHO | Addressing Asias fast growing diabetes epidemic

WHO | Addressing Asias fast growing diabetes epidemic


Addressing Asias fast growing diabetes epidemic
Hampered by shortages of resources, specialized services and skilled health workers, India and other countries in south-east Asia are scrambling to respond to type 2 diabetes epidemics. Sophie Cousins reports.
Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2017;95:550-551. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.17.020817
A diabetes nutrition counselling session at Dr Mohans Diabetes Specialities Centre in Chennai.
During a visit to his native village outside the Indian city of Chennai, steel plant worker K Shankar (not his real name), 51, dropped in at Dr Mohans Diabetes Specialities Centre for a check-up, where he discovered his blood sugar was high, though not quite high enough to be type 2 diabetes.
They advised me to change my lifestyle to avoid diabetes, he says. Shankar used to eat a lot of white rice a large part of the diet of Indias 1.3 billion population but has since switched to smaller quantities of brown rice with lots of vegetables. He also goes for a walk twice a day.
Set up in 1991, the centre is part of a network of 32 private clinics offering care for some 400 000 diabetes patients across nine Indian states. The centre has also become a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborating centre.
Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when either the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin (type 1) or when the body cant effectively use the insulin it produces (type 2).
An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, according to WHOs Global report on diabetes 2016.
Between 1980 and 2014, the Continue reading

LDLHow Low to Go In People With Diabetes?

LDLHow Low to Go In People With Diabetes?


For Professionals Research Updates Diabetes complications
LDLHow Low to Go In People With Diabetes?
Compelling data supports achieving a very low LDL-Cholesterol with combined statin-evolocumab therapy to reduce further risk of cardiovascular events, which presents important implications for people with diabetes.
With Robert Giugliano, MD, and Priyathama Vellanki, MD
Reducing LDL-cholesterol to less than 30 mg/dL with a combination of a statin and the PCSK9 inhibitor, evolocumab (Repatha), produced favorable clinical outcomes in patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including significant reductions in myocardial infarctions (MI) and stroke,1 according to findings presented at the American College of Cardiology annual scientific sessions, and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine. 2
Among the more than 27,000 patients enrolled in the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk) trial,2LDL-C was lowered 59%, but more telling was a 15% reduction in the 5-point composite of MI, stroke, hospitalization for angina, revascularization, and mortality.
CVD Risk Points to Need for Very Low LDL-Cholesterol
The study findings validated the lipid recommendation of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE),3 to treat patients who fell into the extreme risk category for CVD to achieve LDL levels of less than 55 mg/dl, published earlier this year in the AACE Lipids Guidelines Update.
In the FOURIER trial, evolocumab was typically given in combination with a b Continue reading

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