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Maternal Obesity As A Risk Factor For Early Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide, Prospective, Population-based Case–control Study

Maternal obesity as a risk factor for early childhood type 1 diabetes: a nationwide, prospective, population-based case–control study

Maternal obesity as a risk factor for early childhood type 1 diabetes: a nationwide, prospective, population-based case–control study

Abstract
Genetic and environmental factors are believed to cause type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of maternal BMI and gestational weight gain on the subsequent risk of childhood type 1 diabetes.
Children in the Swedish National Quality Register for Diabetes in Children were matched with control children from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Children were included whose mothers had data available on BMI in early pregnancy and gestational weight gain, giving a total of 16,179 individuals: 3231 children with type 1 diabetes and 12,948 control children.
Mothers of children with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be obese (9% [n = 292/3231] vs 7.7% [n = 991/12,948]; p = 0.02) and/or have diabetes themselves (2.8% [n = 90/3231] vs 0.8% [n = 108/12,948]; p < 0.001) compared with mothers of control children. Gestational weight gain did not differ significantly between the two groups of mothers. In mothers without diabetes, maternal obesity was a significant risk factor for type 1 diabetes in the offspring (p = 0.04). A child had an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes if the mother had been obese in early pregnancy (crude OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.05, 1.38; adjusted OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.02, 1.36). Among children with type 1 diabetes (n = 3231) there was a difference (p < 0.001) in age at onset in relation to the mother’s BMI. Among children in the oldest age group (15–19 years), there were more mothers who had been underweight during pregnancy, while in the youngest age group (0–4 years) the pattern was reversed.
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Drinking red wine regularly reduces risk of diabetes

Drinking red wine regularly reduces risk of diabetes

Drinking red wine three to four times a week lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes according to a recent study by Danish researchers.
The study, carried out on over 70,000 people over five years, was published in Diabetologia and monitored how much and how often they drank.
The results found that drinking moderately three to four times a week reduced a woman’s risk of type 2 diabetes by 32%, while it lowered a man’s risk by 27%.
Red wine was found to be particularly beneficial to lowering the risk of developing diabetes because the polyphenols in red wine help to manage blood sugar levels, according to the study.
Men who drink one to six beers a week lowered their risk of diabetes by 21% but there was no impact on women’s risk.
Meanwhile, a high intake of spirits among women significantly increased their risk of diabetes, while there was no effect in men.
Experts warned that the results shouldn’t be treated as a “green light” to drink in excess of the existing NHS guidelines – 14 units of alcohol a week.
“We found that drinking frequency has an independent effect from the amount of alcohol taken.
“It’s better to drink the alcohol in four portions rather than all at once,” said Prof Janne Tolstrup, from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark.
The study also found that drinking moderately a few times a week lowered the risk of cardiovascular disorders, such as heart attacks and strokes. Continue reading

Cheers! For those managing diabetes, wine can help, study says

Cheers! For those managing diabetes, wine can help, study says

(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
People with Type 2 diabetes get an earful of grim lectures about their health prospects and endure much hardship to manage their condition well. But new research offers those who do so a rare reward. A glass of wine every day not only won't hurt, says a new study: It can actually improve cardiac health, help manage cholesterol and foster better sleep.
The new research, published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that compared with a nightly glass of mineral water, a single glass of wine--red or white--offered those with well-managed Type 2 diabetes some benefits.
After two years, those who drank a glass of white wine nightly improved their triglyceride levels compared with those who drank water or red wine.
See the most-read stories in Science this hour >>
But red wine's benefits were far more numerous and more pronounced than those of white wine: Ruby-colored varietals significantly increased participants' HDL cholesterol--the "good" form of cholesterol that protects against heart disease--by nearly 10% and improved the overall cholesterol profiles of those who got it. Red wine drinkers also saw improvements in their apolipoprotein a1 levels--a measure of lipid metabolism.
Compared with study participants who drank mineral water nightly and those who had a glass of white wine, diabetics who drank a glass of red wine nightly also had fewer symptoms of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, excess abdominal fat, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol levels) at the end of two years.
In people without disease, many studies hav Continue reading

How the Ketogenic Diet Works for Type 2 Diabetes

How the Ketogenic Diet Works for Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms.
With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes.
Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates.
The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include:
eggs
fish such as salmon
cottage cheese
avocado
olives and olive oil
nuts and nut butters
seeds
The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already hav Continue reading

Abbott wins FDA approval for diabetes device that doesn't require routine finger pricks

Abbott wins FDA approval for diabetes device that doesn't require routine finger pricks

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System for adults, which already is sold in 41 other countries.
Abbott Laboratories has gained clearance to start selling in the U.S. the first continuous glucose monitor that does not require people with diabetes to routinely prick their fingers.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System for adults, which already is sold in 41 other countries.
The device consists of a small sensor, about the size of a quarter, that’s worn on the back of the upper arm to continuously track glucose levels. The sensor, unlike other wearable sensors, does not require patients to prick their fingers for calibration. Patients can place a hand-held reader near the device to see their current glucose levels, trends, patterns and where those levels might be headed. They can then use those readings to figure out how much insulin to take to manage their diabetes.
The device has not yet been approved for use by children in the U.S. but Abbott hopes to gain approval from the FDA.
The company is not disclosing pricing information until it gets closer to launching the product in the U.S., which will likely be before the end of the year, said Abbott spokeswoman Vicky Assardo. But she said in an email the price will be “very similar” to the price in Europe, where the reader costs about $69, and each sensor, which lasts about 14 days, also costs about $69, before insurance. In the U.S., the sensor will last about 10 days.
“We Continue reading

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