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Making Diabetes Self-Management Education Patient-Centered: Results From A North Carolina Program

Making Diabetes Self-Management Education Patient-Centered: Results From a North Carolina Program

Making Diabetes Self-Management Education Patient-Centered: Results From a North Carolina Program


Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > March 2017 Published on: March 05, 2017
Making Diabetes Self-Management Education Patient-Centered: Results From a North Carolina Program
How tailoring a diabetes self-management program to patients' cultural and individual needs brought success.
At present in the United States, 29 million individuals have diabetes1 and 86 million have prediabetes, and the CDC estimates that 9 of every 10 persons with prediabetes are unaware of the condition.2 The annual financial toll of the disease is $245 billion in healthcare and lost productivity costs, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA).3
How can we change these statistics? Based on my experiences as a nurse and diabetes educator, we will not be effective in fighting the nations diabetes epidemic without more foot soldiers in the trenches alongside our patients. Its during this day-to-day work that we, as diabetes educators, spend time with our patientsevaluating them and encouraging them. Once we understand the daily barriers to success, we can make adjustments for when life happens.
In October 2014, Northwest Medical Partners of Mount Airy, North Carolina, created a Diabetic Center of Excellence. (The practice has since joined Northern Family Medicine of Surry County.4) From inception, this center was designed to produce measurable and reportable patient outcomes and, when possible, to reduce the amount of medication patients needed while improving glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels.5 The overall goal of this program is to equip each patient with the resources, tools, and Continue reading

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Quitting Smoking With Diabetes

Quitting Smoking With Diabetes


Pretty much anyone who smokes knows that its important to quit. Smoking affects so many aspects of your health, and it definitely has an impact on your diabetes management. But, according to the website Smokefree.gov , Many ex-smokers say quitting was the hardest thing they ever did. However, millions of Americans have quit smoking, so it can be done. Read on to learn the whys and hows of quitting smoking, and find out whats worked for others.
Think back to when you started smoking. Maybe you were a teenager or a young adult. Maybe you had friends or parents who smoked. You might have seen ads, TV shows, or movies that glamorized smoking. But once you start to smoke, its all too easy to get hooked, thanks to nicotine, an addictive substance found in tobacco. Nicotine can make you feel good, and it promotes relaxation and stress relief. It acts on the nervous system and the brain to boost levels of dopamine, a feel-good chemical.
The effects of nicotine wear off quickly, though, which is why someone who smokes feels the urge to light up frequently. Over time, the body starts to build up a tolerance, and more nicotine is needed to prevent feeling irritable or edgy, setting in motion a vicious cycle of dependency. If you smoke, chances are you reach for a cigarette when youre stressed out, anxious, or upset. Smoking provides quick relief and helps you calm down.
According to the American Cancer Society, two out of three smokers want to quit, and half try to quit every year, but most wont succeed without help. Nicotine causes a physical and emotional dependence thats tough Continue reading

Microneedle-array patches loaded with dual mineralized protein/peptide particles for type 2 diabetes therapy

Microneedle-array patches loaded with dual mineralized protein/peptide particles for type 2 diabetes therapy


Microneedle-array patches loaded with dual mineralized protein/peptide particles for type 2 diabetes therapy
Nature Communicationsvolume8, Articlenumber:1777 (2017)
The delivery of therapeutic peptides for diabetes therapy is compromised by short half-lives of drugs with the consequent need for multiple daily injections that reduce patient compliance and increase treatment cost. In this study, we demonstrate a smart exendin-4 (Ex4) delivery device based on microneedle (MN)-array patches integrated with dual mineralized particles separately containing Ex4 and glucose oxidase (GOx). The dual mineralized particle-based system can specifically release Ex4 while immobilizing GOx as a result of the differential response to the microenvironment induced by biological stimuli. In this manner, the system enables glucose-responsive and closed-loop release to significantly improve Ex4 therapeutic performance. Moreover, integration of mineralized particles can enhance the mechanical strength of alginate-based MN by crosslinking to facilitate skin penetration, thus supporting painless and non-invasive transdermal administration. We believe this smart glucose-responsive Ex4 delivery holds great promise for type 2 diabetes therapy by providing safe, long-term, and on-demand Ex4 therapy.
Diabetes mellitus is one of the most challenging health problems of the twentieth century, affecting more than 285 million people in 2010, with an expected rise to 439 million by 2030 1 , 2 . A typical clinical pathological feature of diabetes is a disorder of glucose regulation, which results in sever Continue reading

Asians With Type 2 Diabetes At Greater Risk Of Cancer

Asians With Type 2 Diabetes At Greater Risk Of Cancer

AsianScientist (Mar. 20, 2017) – Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 26 percent increase in the risk of death from cancer in Asians, as well as increases in the risk of death from site-specific cancers that can be even greater. These findings have been published in Diabetologia.
There is increasing evidence of an association between T2D and an individual’s risk of developing cancer or dying from the disease. Most of the studies into this relationship have looked only at Western populations, but with diabetes becoming increasingly prevalent throughout Asia, it is important to understand whether the risk of developing cancer in Asians with T2D is similar to that seen in the West, or whether they face different, and possibly greater risks than white western populations.
Earlier research had suggested that at any given body mass index (BMI), Asians are more susceptible to developing insulin resistance, and go on to have a higher prevalence of T2D in comparison with people of European extraction.
Although there have been previous studies of diabetes and site-specific cancer risk in East Asian populations, the majority only considered one or a few cancer types, included only a small number of patients with diabetes, or didn’t control for other important risk factors such as obesity.
Data for this new study were drawn from the Asia Cohort Consortium, an international effort which combines 29 cohorts to examine the relationship between genetics, environment, and disease in a population of more than one million people. From that, 19 cohorts were chosen and further refin Continue reading

What Is Your Biggest Diabetes Fear?

What Is Your Biggest Diabetes Fear?


What would be or what is your biggest fear in dealing with diabetes?
This was the question I posed to the diabetes community to find out what their biggest fears were. I also shared with them my biggest fear and the fears that already occurred.
My Fear: Weve experienced a lot throughout these short almost 7 years since my sons diagnosis . In his first year of being diagnosed he was put on a sliding scale (which I learned I HATE ) and passed out from a low blood sugar , his sister (who was 4 at the time) found him unconscious in his room. This was only 2 months into diagnosis and I had to give glucagon.
After that scare, fast forward two months later (4 months into DX) he was acting strange so I tested, he was 143. My husband thought he was misbehaving but to me it felt like something was just off or not right about him so I made him come downstairs with me so I could monitor him closer. I tested him again 15 mins later and he was 99, I thought geez thats a big drop so we gave him a juice box. Not but 5-7 minutes later he suffered a seizure.
Diabetes Experts Share Ways To Lower Your A1C Levels
My husband called 911 and an ambulance was on the way but I tested during this time and he was 43, just like that. After this hospital stay they realized his sliding scale was too high (ya think??) I asked this the first time but they looked at me like I didnt know what I was talking about, you know we were only 2 months in. Since that day, weve had our fair share of crappy days with T1D (Highs, and lows, and a second diagnosis of my daughter), but nothing (thank god) as frighte Continue reading

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