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Living With Diabetes: Teeth And Gum Problems To Be Aware Of

Living With Diabetes: Teeth and Gum Problems to be Aware of

Living With Diabetes: Teeth and Gum Problems to be Aware of

Diabetes can lead to a whole host of health problems, but did you know that it can also put you at risk for dental issues? The implications of high blood sugar extend to every part of the body — including teeth and gums. When it comes to diabetes, teeth and gum problems are something you need to be aware of.
Diabetes: Teeth and Gum Problems to Look Out For
Here are few of the ways diabetes can wreak havoc on your mouth, and how you can prevent this damage from occurring if you are one of the 21.9 million people in the U.S. who suffer from diabetes.
Gum Disease
Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the gums, which increases the risk for gum disease. This risk is amplified if you had poor dental health prior to being diagnosed with diabetes.
Gum disease takes two forms: gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis is less serious, but can develop into periodontitis if left untreated. In addition to cutting off blood to the gums, diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection, putting the gums at risk for gingivitis, an inflammation caused by the bacteria in the form of plaque. The longer plaque remains on your teeth, the more it irritates the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth.
The main symptoms of gingivitis are red, swollen, and bleeding gums. It is important to contact your dentist as soon as these symptoms develop so the problem can be addressed.
Untreated gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which affects the tissue and bones that support your teeth. In addition to red bleeding gums, other symptoms incl Continue reading

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Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk of Tooth Loss

Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk of Tooth Loss

Study of 40-year trend focused on three ethnic groups prone to dental complications.
Diabetes has been increasing in the United States over the years. According to the CDC, diabetes rate have tripled from 1980 to 2014. Diabetics are at risk for multiple complications such as cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, eye damage, hearing impairment, skin disease, and periodontal disease. Researchers have identified a relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. About half of the U.S. population suffers from periodontal disease and the prevalence for periodontal disease is greater in adults with diabetes.
“One of the many complications of diabetes is a greater risk for periodontal disease,” said Maria E. Ryan, DDS, PhD, Professor of Oral Biology and Pathology, and Director of Clinical Research, School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook University, New York, in a recent interview. “If you have this oral infection and inflammation, as with any infection, it’s much more difficult to control blood glucose levels.” Intensive periodontitis treatment significantly reduces levels of A1C.
These links between oral and systemic health may start even before clinical diabetes begins. “We have found evidence that the severity of periodontal disease is associated with higher levels of insulin resistance, often a precursor of type 2 diabetes, as well as with higher levels of A1C, a measure of poor glycemic control of diabetes,” she said.
The importance of these findings were emphasized by her colleague, George W. Taylor, DrPH, DMD, Associate Professor of Dentistry, Schools of D Continue reading

Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

OBJECTIVE The effect of fructose on cardiometabolic risk in humans is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials to clarify the effect of fructose on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (through 22 March 2012) for relevant trials lasting ≥7 days. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method (random-effects models) and expressed as mean difference (MD) for fasting glucose and insulin and standardized MD (SMD) with 95% CI for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q statistic and quantified by the I2 statistic. Trial quality was assessed by the Heyland methodological quality score (MQS).
RESULTS Eighteen trials (n = 209) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for carbohydrate reduced glycated blood proteins (SMD −0.25 [95% CI −0.46 to −0.04]; P = 0.02) with significant intertrial heterogeneity (I2 = 63%; P = 0.001). This reduction is equivalent to a ∼0.53% reduction in HbA1c. Fructose consumption did not significantly affect fasting glucose or insulin. A priori subgroup analyses showed no evidence of effect modification on any end point.
CONCLUSIONS Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate improves long-term glycemic control, as assessed by glycated blood proteins, without affecting insulin in people with diabetes. Generalizability may be limited because most of the trials were <12 weeks and had relatively low MQS (<8). Continue reading

So You know You’re a Person with Diabetes When?

So You know You’re a Person with Diabetes When?

Living with diabetes on a daily basis is challenging as it is. From the constant pokes with a needle to the monitoring of blood sugar levels, to counting carbs and more.
It is a never ending process, even when you are sleeping, chances are you’re dreaming of something diabetes related, or get woken up from a low or high blood sugar. Every once in a while, you probably just wish for a break from it all.
While unfortunately, you can’t necessarily take a break from diabetes, as much as you want to, you can change the way you think about things in a more positive light. When we dwell on the negativity that comes with the disease, it tends to take us over. In time you will notice that you no longer wake up happy, you instead wake up to the thought of doing everything to manage your diabetes all over again, like an endless cycle.
You May not have Control over Diabetes, But You Control Your Mind
I’m not a professional by any means, nor do I live with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) myself, but I am a mother of two children with type 1 diabetes. While the effects of what is happening in their body do not directly affect my body, I am still responsible for teaching these two kids how to live a happy, full life, despite the fact they have a chronic condition that will always be with them.
This is a huge responsibility! How they manage their diabetes when they are adults will be a direct impact of what I teach them during the years they are with me. Sure teaching them all the basics and necessary skills on how to test their blood sugar, count carbs, give insulin, etc. is all VERY im Continue reading

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Could babies be at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes from drinking formula made from cow's milk? That idea has been circulating for some time but the evidence has been scant and contradictory. A study published Tuesday makes it seem less likely.
There are two types of diabetes, and both are on the rise. It's clear that a major driving force behind the increase of Type 2 diabetes, which mainly affects adults, is the eating habits that are also driving the rise of obesity.
A much bigger mystery is what has been propelling the increase of Type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile diabetes). This disease usually strikes children and takes hold when a child's immune system starts attacking cells in the pancreas that produce insulin.
Researchers in Finland have been trying to tease apart the role of cow's milk for many years. In 2010 they published some intriguing results. They looked at antibodies that appear to be part of the Type 1 diabetes process. Studying 230 infants, they found these antibodies were more common in babies who consumed formula produced from cow's milk, compared with babies who were fed a formula in which those milk proteins had been broken down.
The results from that small study only suggested that whole proteins from cow's milk are triggering the immune reaction that leads to type 1 diabetes. But if that proved to be the case, there would be an easy way to reduce the risk of the disease: simply make sure baby formula was based on degraded milk proteins rather than whole proteins.
To find out whether that would indeed work, the scientists devised a very Continue reading

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