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KINGS Herbal | REH KINGS Herbal Official website | Ka Rey Herrera KINGS Herbal - one of leading herbal food supplement in the Philippines | Herbal supplement best for diabetes, hypertension, cancer, kidney stone and various diseases and illnesses

KINGS Herbal | REH KINGS Herbal Official website | Ka Rey Herrera KINGS Herbal - one of leading herbal food supplement in the Philippines | Herbal supplement best for diabetes, hypertension, cancer, kidney stone and various diseases and illnesses


Diabetes and Amputation: How to Protect your Feet
Why does diabetes commonly lead to foot amputation?
It is because diabetes can lead to peripheral artery disease, which causes your blood vessels to narrow and reduces blood flow to your legs and feet. Reduced blood flow can slow wound healing. It can also make your body less effective at fighting infection. As a result, your wound may not heal.
It may also cause nerve damage, known as peripheral neuropathy. This could prevent you from feeling pain. Normally a person with an injury on the bottom of their foot, such as a blister, will change the way they walk, because you are going to protect that blistered spot until it heals up. People with a loss of sensation dont do that. They will just walk right on top of that blister as though it wasnt there. It can burst, become infected, and turn into a foot ulcer. That ulceration can go right down to the bone and become an avenue for infection into the whole foot. Thats what leads to amputations. The most common amputations in people with diabetes are the toes, feet, and lower legs.
Fortunately, there are steps you can take, heres what you need to know to keep your feet healthy:
The single most important thing that a person with diabetes can do to prevent a problem is to look at their feet every day, just as they comb their hair or brush their teeth. You can use a mirror to examine your feet or have a family member check your feet for you. If youre not regularly checking your feet, start now. It only takes a few minutes each day. Make it a part of your morning or evening rou Continue reading

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Anthroposophical Aspects of Diabetes Treatment

Anthroposophical Aspects of Diabetes Treatment

By Ross Rentea, M.D..
Issue: Winter 2006: Gratitude and Love - Issue #46 Vol 11
Medical doctor Ross Rentea invites us to explore some of the deeper causes behind diabetes. Probing the relationship between our physical condition, cultural influences and our soul and spirit, he explores how an anthroposophic physician treats the individual with a diabetic condition. When it is generally acknowledged that high blood sugar, obesity, high blood pressure and high blood fats have reached epidemic proportions, it might behoove us to ask whether, beyond the individual predilections, might we be exposed early in life to cultural factors that predispose many of us to exhibit these prevalent problems later in life.
Significantly, Rudolf Steiner explained in the 1920s1: “Imagine that you are stressing the memory capacity of the child excessively around the ninth or tenth year of life, that memory is used too much as a means in education. The consequences of this will show themselves only when the human being is in his thirties or forties or even later. Then the person will become either a sufferer of rheumatism or diabetes. Precisely when memory is used inappropriately around the ninth or tenth year of life, then this overwhelming of memory in childhood will show itself later in excessive deposits of metabolic products ... On the other hand, when the child is required to use too little memory – when we are appealing too little to the child’s ability to remember – then we will call forth in later life a tendency for inflammatory processes of all sorts. To understand how the bodil Continue reading

States investigate pharma companies, CVS Health as diabetes drug prices reach record highs

States investigate pharma companies, CVS Health as diabetes drug prices reach record highs


Post a comment / Oct 30, 2017 at 6:44 AM
A patient loads insulin for his routine shot.
With the price of a crucial diabetes drug skyrocketing, at least five states and a federal prosecutor are demanding information from insulin manufacturers and the pharmaceutical industry’s financial middlemen, seeking answers about their business relationships and the soaring price of diabetes drugs.
Attorneys general in Washington, Minnesota and New Mexico issued civil investigative demands this year and are sharing information with Florida and California, according to various  corporate financial filings.
Insulin makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, Sanofi and top pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health are targets in the state investigations. Several of the financial filings note that the state and federal prosecutors want information regarding specific insulins for specific dates in relation to “trade practices.”
They appear to be looking into potentially anti-competitive business dealings that critics have leveled at this more than  $20  billion niche market of the pharmaceutical industry, according to analysts and court filings reviewed by Kaiser Health News. These include whether drugmakers and middlemen in the supply chain have allowed prices to escalate in order to increase their profits.
At the same time, prominent class-action lawyers are bringing suits on behalf of patients. Steve Berman, an attorney best known for winning a multibillion-dollar settlement from the tobacco industry, alleged collusion and said it was time to break up the  “insulin racket.”
The Continue reading

The role of bariatric surgery to treat diabetes: current challenges and perspectives

The role of bariatric surgery to treat diabetes: current challenges and perspectives


The role of bariatric surgery to treat diabetes: current challenges and perspectives
1 Carel W. le Roux ,2,3 and Alexander Kokkinos 1
1First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
1First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
2Diabetes Complications Research Centre, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
3Investigative Science, Imperial College London, London, UK
1First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
1First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
2Diabetes Complications Research Centre, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
3Investigative Science, Imperial College London, London, UK
Chrysi Koliaki, Email: [email protected] .
Received 2017 May 27; Accepted 2017 Aug 6.
Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Crea Continue reading

Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management

Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management


Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management
Living with Type 1 diabetes has many day-to-day challenges and over the years patients have faced confusion, misunderstanding and discrimination.
Not enough insulin and/or insulin resistance
Managed with exercise, diet and medication
This week is Diabetes Awareness Week and while it is becoming more recognised there are still many misconceptions.
There is often confusion between Type 1 and Type 2, which can be frustrating for everyone with diabetes.
In the past, discrimination has caused people with Type 1 diabetes to suffer major changes to their lives.
For Ros Cameron, 68, Type 1 diabetes almost ended her dream of becoming a teacher before it started.
She was diagnosed in January 1967 just after she had finished year 12 and had earned a scholarship to teacher's college.
But because of her diabetes she failed the mandatory medical test and was barred.
"I had to then rearrange my life," she said.
Her father lobbied the Victorian Education to end the discrimination.
"[He] thought, 'this is not right, it should be each person on their merits'," she said.
"Over a long period ... three years, the law was eventually changed that diabetics were admitted into government institutions according to their merits."
Two years later she was able to begin studies and eventually become a teacher.
"It was a very disappointing start to what I'd hoped would have been a long career in teaching," she said.
Diabetes management has changed since Ms Cameron was first diagnosed.
She had to learn ho Continue reading

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