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Ketogenic Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet for Type 2 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet for Type 2 Diabetes

Any diabetic will tell you: following a healthy diet is vital to maintaining a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. While it is contrary to what we traditionally believe to be “healthy”, the ketogenic diet has become increasingly popular among diabetics.
What is the Keto Diet?
The keto diet involves a very high consumption of dietary fats, and very low carbohydrate consumption. Through these nutritional changes, the body reduces its use of glucose for fuel, and increasingly uses ketones (derived from fats). The diet was first used to control epileptic seizures, but there is growing body of research showing positive effects on Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injury, inflammation1, and diabetes.
Benefits of the Keto Diet for Diabetics
When you are diabetic it is vital to discuss nutritional changes with your doctor prior to starting a new diet. If you are a diabetic considering the ketogenic diet, here are a few potential benefits to bring up with your doctor:
Weight Loss on the Ketogenic Diet
Type 2 diabetes and obesity are closely linked: 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are also overweight or obese2. The CDC recommends weight loss as a means to maintaining a healthier body for those struggling with diabetes because it can positively affect blood sugar levels and reduce risks of other related health conditions3.
Because weight loss can have such a dramatic positive impact for those struggling with type 2 diabetes, most of the diets prescribed to diabetics focus on weight loss. The ketogenic diet is no exception, and often leads to su Continue reading

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Smoking & Diabetes: A Deathly Combination

Smoking & Diabetes: A Deathly Combination

Smoking kills. Diabetes kills silently. Smoking over Diabetes kills quick, out of the blue.
In cinema commercials, in a mall, inside our office, almost a million times over we encounter these two words ‘Smoking Kills’. Smokers or non-smokers, we all know how smoking is jeopardous to life. Still and all, the risk multiplies profoundly when smoking follows diabetes. Let’s see how.
What is Diabetes?
Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterised by increased levels of sugar in the blood. Blood sugar or blood glucose is the primary source of energy for the body. A healthy human body has a normal blood sugar level of 5.5mmol/litre; with minor fluctuations depending on the person’s diet. This sugar is regulated by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by pancreas. When the body receives glucose from food, insulin carries this glucose to cells where it is absorbed and further released as energy.
And so, when the body is suffering from diabetes, the level of sugar crosses the normal limit. This happens due to either of the two reasons:
1. Insulin Deficiency
In this case, pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. This results in Diabetes Type 1.
2. Insulin Resistance
Also known as Diabetes Type 2, this is the most common type of diabetes. It develops when the cells stop responding to the insulin produced.
In both the cases, the glucose, instead of absorbing in the cells, starts accumulating in the blood leading to dis functioning in blood flow.
Both smoking and diabetes are causes of cardiovascular diseases. When combined, they can only aggravate the disease. But this Continue reading

Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved

Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved

A complete picture of the areas that the immune system attacks to cause type 1 diabetes has finally been revealed by scientists.
The study, published in the journal Diabetes, discovered the fifth and final critical target at which the immune system errantly takes aim.
The team at the University of Lincoln say the findings could help develop new ways to prevent and treat the disease.
Diabetes UK said the findings were "impressive".
In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the beta cells that make insulin - the hormone needed to keep blood sugar levels under control.
Studies looking at the unique antibodies made by patients with type 1 showed there were five key targets that the immune system attacked.
But working out exactly what they were has been like identifying someone from their silhouette.
Studies long ago discovered some of the targets, but the final one has proved elusive for two decades.
Dr Michael Christie, who led the research at the University of Lincoln, told the BBC: "With this new discovery, we have now finished identifying what the immune system is targeting - we have the complete picture."
The targets are:
Insulin
Glutamate decarboxylase
IA-2
Zinc transporter-8
And the final piece of the puzzle, tetraspanin-7
The more technically named ones are largely involved in secreting or storing the hormone insulin.
Knowledge of some of these targets is already being used in a trial at King's College London that is aiming to stall the progression of type 1.
But Dr Christie says having the complete picture could help transform care for type 1 patients.
He said: "O Continue reading

Deadly diabetes in 'unrelenting march'

Deadly diabetes in 'unrelenting march'

The world is facing an "unrelenting march" of diabetes which now affects nearly one in 11 adults, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.
In a major report it warned cases had nearly quadrupled to 422 million in 2014 from 108 million in 1980.
High blood sugar levels are a major killer - linked to 3.7 million deaths around the world each year, it says.
And officials said the numbers would continue to increase unless "drastic action" was taken.
The report lumps both type 1 and type 2 diabetes together, but the surge in cases is predominantly down to type 2 - the form closely linked to poor lifestyle.
As the world's waistlines have ballooned - with one-in-three people now overweight, so too has the number of diabetes cases.
How diabetes has taken its toll
422 million
adults were living with diabetes in 2014 - that's
314 million
more than there were in 1980
8.5% of adults worldwide has diabetes
1.5 million people died as a result of diabetes in 2012
2.2 million additional deaths were caused by higher-than-optimal blood glucose
43% of these 3.7m people died before they were 70 years old
Source: WHO
Dr Etienne Krug, the WHO official in charge of leading efforts against diabetes, told the BBC: "Diabetes is a silent disease, but it is on an unrelenting march that we need to stop.
"We can stop it, we know what needs to be done, but we cannot let it evolve like it does because it has a huge impact on people's health, on families and on society."
Failing to control levels of sugar in the blood has devastating health consequences.
It triples the risk of a heart attack and leaves peop Continue reading

Drinking a few times a week linked to lower diabetes risk

Drinking a few times a week linked to lower diabetes risk

Drinking three to four times a week has been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than never drinking, Danish researchers suggest.
Wine appears to be particularly beneficial, probably as it plays a role in helping to manage blood sugar, the study, published in Diabetologia, says.
They surveyed more than 70,000 people on their alcohol intake - how much and how often they drank.
But experts said this wasn't a "green light" to drink more than recommended.
And Public Health England warned that consuming alcohol contributed to a vast number of other serious diseases, including some cancers, heart and liver disease.
"People should keep this in mind when thinking about how much they drink," a spokeswoman said.
'Better effect'
Prof Janne Tolstrup, from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark, who led the research, said: "We found that drinking frequency has an independent effect from the amount of alcohol taken.
"We can see it's a better effect to drink the alcohol in four portions rather than all at once."
After around five years, study participants were followed up and a total of 859 men and 887 women group had developed diabetes - either type 1 or the more common type 2.
The researchers concluded that drinking moderately three to four times a week was linked to a 32% reduced risk of diabetes in women, and 27% in men, compared with people drinking on less than one day a week.
Findings also suggest that not all types of alcohol had the same effect.
Wine appeared to be particularly beneficial because polyphenols, particularly in red wine, Continue reading

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