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Ken's Engineered Type 1 Diabetes Whole Food Plant Based Low Fat Lifestyle

Ken's Engineered Type 1 Diabetes Whole Food Plant Based Low Fat Lifestyle

Ken's Engineered Type 1 Diabetes Whole Food Plant Based Low Fat Lifestyle

Previous experiences with my doctors were extremely difficult because they wanted to control my Type 1 diabetes by prescribing specific medication doses and defining what I should eat. But, none of that was working. I felt extremely diseased and disabled. I was kind of terrified from all that and so decided to apply the techniques of my profession: fault analysis and electronic design. In addition to studying cellular level biology at the Midwestern State University library, I began an elimination diet to find out what foods did what. All the foods my doctors were telling me to eat were not working. In fact, those foods made things far worse. That was how I discovered that plant based foods, very low fat and low protein with no animal products were the best foods. I found starches and fruits made diabetic control and my life extremely easy.
Every time I would go to my doctor, however, I would end up in an argument. He would review my blood work and tell me that my blood work was the best he had ever seen. My A1c was 5.1 my total cholesterol was 100. Then his next sentence was that he wanted to put me on Lipitor. I asked him why and he told me it was because "All diabetics should be on Lipitor." He then proceeded to explain that my diet was all wrong because it was not a proper diabetic diet. He explained that my A1c was too low and should be in the diabetic range - since I am a diabetic. This went on until June of 2012.
2012 was the year I discovered Dr. McDougall during some casual Google surfing. I did not know before that time that there was such a thing as a plant based Continue reading

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Manage Diabetes Naturally with Essential Oils

Manage Diabetes Naturally with Essential Oils


Home > Aromatherapy and Essential Oils > Manage Diabetes Naturally with Essential Oils
Manage Diabetes Naturally with Essential Oils
Posted on June 19, 2017 by Chad Pegura | 16 comments
Diabetes is one of the most dangerous diseases out there. While things like cancer can certainly be serious, diabetes is a long-term condition that can bring about a wide range of health issues ranging from loss of limbs to heart failure and beyond. In short, its something that has to be treated and managed properly in order to live the longest, healthiest life possible.
The seriousness of diabetes means that it has to be managed with help from a medical professional at all times. However, there are natural steps that can be taken as well which will help dramatically. Taking a look at some of the essential oils and how they can fit into a natural diabetes regimen is well worth doing.
Diabetes is a condition wherein the body either doesnt make or doesnt use insulin properly. Type 1 diabetes is a problem with no insulin production, while type 2 is when the body fails to utilize insulin that is made correctly.
Both types are very serious, and since insulin controls the amount of sugar in the blood, they will each impact your health dramatically. Again, speaking with a doctor is the first step towards controlling diabetes. However, adding essential oils to your daily routine can help you to manage the condition even more effectively.
Building Your Natural Diabetes Treatment Regimen
Essential oils are just one component of treatment. Along with blood sugar monitoring and use of insulin Continue reading

Drinking Red Wine With Type 2 Diabetes: Resveratrol Benefits Heart Health By Reducing Arterial Stiffness

Drinking Red Wine With Type 2 Diabetes: Resveratrol Benefits Heart Health By Reducing Arterial Stiffness


Drinking Red Wine With Type 2 Diabetes: Resveratrol Benefits Heart Health By Reducing Arterial Stiffness
In the battle of the wines, when it comes red versus white, science tends to side with the darker blend. Drinking red wine has been touted for its health benefits, especially for diabetics, from improving cholesterol to blood sugar levels. Now, researchers at Boston University in Massachusetts suggest there's another reason to toast it can decrease artery stiffness in people with type 2 diabetes.
Resveratrol, an antioxidant commonly present in some wine and fruits, is found to have a protective effect against heart disease by improving vascular function and reducing inflammation. The natural compound is known to slow down premature aging of the arteries by activating SIRT1 a gene that slows down the aging. Specifically, it's able to reduce the stiffness of the aorta, which is the main artery that transports blood from the heart and into the rest of the body.
Read More: People With Type 2 Diabetes May Benefit From Drinking Red Wine In The Context Of A Healthy, Mediterranean Diet
In the new study , presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Peripheral Vascular Disease 2017 Scientific Sessions in Minnesota, researchers found a 300 milligram (mg) per day dose of resveratrol decreased aortic stiffness by 9 percent in type 2 diabetes patients. Resveratrol's effect was also seen with a 100 mg daily intake of resveratrol, whichreduced aortic stiffness by 4.8 percent. Contrastingly, patients given the placebo treatm Continue reading

Succeeding with Diabetes on a Vegan Diet

Succeeding with Diabetes on a Vegan Diet


Lee Ann Thill was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 5, back in 1978. I had just started kindergarten, and had all the classic symptoms peeing a lot, drinking a lot, weight loss. My mom took me to the pediatrician after she realized there was something wrong, and I was diagnosed. We went straight to the hospital, where I stayed for two weeks.
Like many of us who were diagnosed decades ago, the narratives around food were confusing. From sweets restrictions to the exchange diet, there wasnt a set diabetes diet that people followed. I dont remember following a diet, aside from avoiding sweets. My mom had an interest in healthful eating and fitness, so the way we ate at home reflected the dieting trends of the times, which amounted to less refined grains, and lower fat foods. I was still allowed to have sweets on special occasions, but we typically didnt have foods like that in the house.
Today, 40 years later, Lee Ann has moved to a vegan diet and lifestyle to manage both her diabetes and her desire to affect positive social change. At age 14, I developed an eating disorder, and didnt recover until age 32, she said. Becoming vegan has reinforced my healing process. For some people, it might appear that Ive traded one category of forbidden foods for another, but as a vegan, I dont think of, lets say, a cheeseburger, as food. Plus, I eat vegan cheeseburgers, so its not like Im missing out. An important idea that has emerged for me from my eating disorder recovery is that everyone including animals deserves to be respected for exactly who they are, nourished, a Continue reading

The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes

The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes


The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes
Although breastfeeding is expected to reduce the incidence of diabetes in women with gestational diabetes, the effect has not been clearly confirmed. We examined whether or not high-intensity breastfeeding reduces the incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance and investigated the effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on insulin resistance during the first year postpartum in Japanese women with current gestational diabetes.
In this retrospective study, we included women with gestational diabetes who underwent postpartum 75g oral glucose tolerance test during the first year (12-14months) postpartum from 2009 to 2011 at a single tertiary perinatal care center in Japan. High-intensity breastfeeding was defined as the condition in which infants were fed by breastfeeding alone or 80% or more of the volume. We investigated the effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on the prevalence of postpartum abnormal glucose tolerance and the postpartum homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), after controlling for confounders, including prepregnancy obesity and weight changes during pregnancy and postpartum.
Among 88 women with gestational diabetes, 46 (52%) had abnormal glucose tolerance during the postpartum period. High-intensity breastfeeding women (n = 70) were significantly less likely to have abnormal glucose tolerance than non-high-intensity breastfeeding women (n = 18) (46% vs. 78%, p = 0.015). High-intensity breastfeeding was also associat Continue reading

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