diabetestalk.net

Jason Wyrick: Cured Type-2 Diabetes And Obesity

Jason Wyrick: Cured Type-2 Diabetes and Obesity

Jason Wyrick: Cured Type-2 Diabetes and Obesity

Cured Type-2 Diabetes – No Cost
When I was in my teens, I was a thin kid, in good health, and very active. I am still amazed that, ten years later, I found myself in a hospital in Austin, Texas, well over a hundred pounds overweight, being treated for an infection, and being told I was diabetic. I was more than scared when I found out, I was ashamed. I was under 30, diabetic, and looking at the prospect of having to take medication for the rest of my life. More than ashamed, I was desperate. I know how I caught the disease. Diabetes was in my family for at least two generations before me and now it looked like it had hit a third. My maternal grandmother was diabetic, both of my parents are diabetic, and my middle brother had many of the symptoms of the disease. I’m fairly certain I had it at least two years before I was diagnosed with it. I was overweight, unnaturally tired, prone to energy spikes and sudden crashes, my intellect was slowing down, and my eyesight was going terribly. That, perhaps, was the most visible (pun intended) symptom, having gone from 20/15 vision down to at least 20/30. Since a number of my family members wore glasses, I just thought I was now going down the same road. I never associated these health issues with diabetes because I simply didn’t know any better. The highest blood sugar I can remember was 290 mg/dl. In hindsight, it may have been a good thing that I was in the hospital being treated for an infection (another symptom of diabetes) because, had I not been diagnosed with it then, the damage to my body would have been far worse.
Fami Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Ways To Prevent Pre-Diabetes From Becoming Diabetes!

Ways To Prevent Pre-Diabetes From Becoming Diabetes!

“What do you mean I am prediabetic? Look at me – I run every day, and I am not overweight!” Sean went through the typical phase of denial, anger, and acceptance. He contacted me because he was diagnosed with prediabetes.
Sean is a hard working entrepreneur with a normal weight, an active lifestyle and never had any weight issues previously. He was not convinced that food played a role in his diagnosis.
During our initial consultation, I immediately learned Sean is a “numbers” guy and needed to see the trends to better connect with his prediabetes. His doctor and I taught him to check and record his blood sugar levels pre and post meals.
He immediately recognized the impact food has on his blood sugar levels by watching a 50 point spike occur 2 hours after he ate a bagel with cream cheese and witnessing a 20 point decrease* when he consumed oatmeal with cinnamon for breakfast.
I reviewed and explained what impact different food components have on his blood levels and why it would influence a spike or drop in his blood sugar response. Sean also incorporated high-intensity training into his exercise regimen to further help with blood sugar uptake.
This allowed him to change his habits and learn to control his blood sugar levels and reverse his prediabetes. To him, success was when he no longer was in the prediabetic range.
Sean was fortunate that his doctor detected prediabetes early enough for intervention. It’s important that we recognize when one has prediabetes to stop it’s progression timely.
Could you be at risk of having prediabetes? Someone in your immedi Continue reading

Could Pitt genetic procedure allow people with type 1 diabetes to produce their own insulin?

Could Pitt genetic procedure allow people with type 1 diabetes to produce their own insulin?

For the first time, medical researchers have developed a genetic procedure that, if the project proceeds as hoped, could allow people with type 1 diabetes biologically to generate their own insulin.
It also could help those with type 2 diabetes produce more insulin and avoid injections.
Only a mouse study is completed, but research underway in primates has shown success to date. However, the research team based at the University of Pittsburgh and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC cannot predict if it will work in humans.
“We have shown for the first time that gene therapy can be specifically and effectively targeted to reverse autoimmune diabetes in mice without the use of any immunosuppressant drugs,” said George K. Gittes, chief of pediatric surgery at Pitt’s School of Medicine and also Children’s chair of pediatric surgery.
The study published online today in the journal Cell Stem Cell says the Pittsburgh-based strategy “could represent a new therapeutic approach,” complemented by drugs to suppress the immune system, “to bolster endogenous insulin production,” which means the body generates sufficient insulin to keep blood-sugar levels in or closer to the normal range.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which one’s own immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.
For nearly a century, doctors have sought a way to allow people with type 1 to biologically produce insulin, the hormone necessary to allow blood sugar to enter cells for use as energy. Without insulin injections or doses from insulin pumps, glucose le Continue reading

As a doctor, I’d rather have HIV than diabetes

As a doctor, I’d rather have HIV than diabetes

‘There is now a deadly virus, which anyone can catch from sex with an infected person. If we’re not careful, the people who’ve died so far, will be just the tip of the iceberg… If you ignore Aids, it could be the death of you.’ It has been hailed as one of the most memorable health campaigns ever created. The message couldn’t have been clearer and people were petrified. For anyone over the age of 30, the ‘Iceberg’ and ‘Tombstone’ adverts — as they came to be known — with John Hurt’s menacing voice-over, still bring back a sense of crushing dread. The UK actually led the way with its HIV public health campaigns; it was considered so successful in raising awareness that other countries adopted similar adverts relying on shock and fear. The thing I am most struck by now, however, is how over-the-top they seem.
It’s now 30 years since HIV was discovered. During my training as a doctor in central London in the late 1990s, people were still dying of Aids. But since then, incredible pharmacological advances have been made in how the virus is treated and managed. Combination medications — termed ‘highly active antiretroviral therapy’ or Haart — have resulted in being able to maintain the infected person’s immune system and therefore prevent the opportunistic infections that resulted in the development of Aids and led to death. Despite working in the centre of London with high-risk groups such as sex workers and drug addicts, I haven’t seen someone die of HIV for years. It’s now incredibly rare to die as a result of HIV/Aids in this country. Continue reading

Home Blood Glucose Monitoring for People with Diabetes

Home Blood Glucose Monitoring for People with Diabetes

Interpreting the Results of Your Glucometer
Checking your blood sugar at home, sometimes called self blood glucose monitoring (SBGM), is an important step in diabetes management. Because individualized diabetes care is associated with better diabetes management, it is important to get your doctor's advice on how often you should test your blood sugar. This includes recommendations for what time of the day you should test your blood sugar, and your personal target ranges for blood sugar control. This article is intended to provide general guidelines for SBGM in order to enhance discussion with your doctor. It is not a substitute for your physician's guidance.
When testing your blood sugar at home, it is important to talk to your doctor or certified diabetes educator about each of the following, which we'll discuss in detail below:
Choosing the best glucose meter for you
Using good technique when testing your blood sugar
When should you test your blood sugar?
How to use and interpret the numbers on the screen
Proper disposal of used testing supplies
How do I choose the best glucometer?
Today, there are many quality-made home blood glucose meters on the market. Choosing the right one for you can be a little overwhelming, so here are some factors to consider.
Many health insurance plans offer some type of coverage for diabetes testing supplies. However, in many cases, your insurance company may recommend a "preferred meter" or a "preferred brand" that must be used in order to avoid paying a high co-pay. It is best to call your insurance company and ask if there is a preferred b Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles