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Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible At Scale?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible at Scale?

If you’re reading this, you probably know that I’m obsessed with longevity. But to really understand longevity, you must understand metabolic health, insulin resistance and, by extension, one of its end-results: type 2 diabetes (T2D). Though my medical practice does not focus on type 2 diabetes, I have taken care of several patients with T2D over the past few years. When I was in medical school I was taught many things about T2D, but one stands out most: T2D is incurable, I was told. Once you have it, you’ve always got it, and the best one can do is “manage” it as a chronic—but irreversible—condition.
But is this really true? Asked another way, is T2D reversible?
My obsession is partly due to my personal journey to better metabolic health, which I’ve documented elsewhere on this blog, and spoken about publicly. But those facts alone, don’t fully explain why I wanted to be involved with Virta Health (I’ll get to them shortly). T2D is a massive societal problem that has the potential to literally bankrupt countries: More than 29 million Americans have T2D and more than 80 million are pre-diabetic. And whether you view it through the lens of population health, or the lens of an individual patient, T2D is perhaps the biggest healthcare challenge of our generation.
At the population level, T2D costs Americans more than $300 billion per year: one of every three Medicare dollars is spent on T2D, and one of every six healthcare dollars is spent on T2D. At the individual level, patients and payers (employers and insurance companies) spend thousands of dollars (of Continue reading

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Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type Two Diabetes is Reversible

Type two diabetes is curable if you ignore your doctor’s advice. Diabetes is not the hopeless disease that most doctors would have us believe it is though it is a long losing battle if you walk the trail western medicine wants you to travel.
Like all the chronic diseases, the western medical establishment does not want you or your doctor to become conscious of the real causes of diabetes and it certainly does not want you to receive treatments that will prevent diabetes from destroying your life.
Hard but true words to define the nature of most diabetic care. One out of three Americans now alive will have the diagnosis before they die writes Dr. Mary Vernon so it is incredibly important for us to understand what causes diabetes and what to do about it.
There are doctors who do cure diabetes and how do they do it? The first thing such doctors understand is that diabetes is inflammatory disease caused by a combination of factors including stress, chemical and heavy metal toxicity, radiation exposure, magnesium, iodine and bicarbonate deficiencies; and nutritional imbalances focused on excessive carbohydrate intake that all come together to burn down the cellular house in slow motion. Sugar excess and dehydration work to create inflammation in the body and this starts a long process that ends up with people facing major diseases including cancer.
“Monitoring of blood-sugar levels, insulin production, acid-base balance, and pancreatic bicarbonate and enzyme production before and after test exposures to potentially allergic substances reveals that the pancreas is the first o Continue reading

Study Finds Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

Study Finds Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or Prediabetes

Recently, researchers set out to quantify just how prevalent the disease and its precursor are among American adults. In a large population-based study(jama.jamanetwork.com) published Sept. 8 in JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association, authors examined the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes and related disease trends in U.S. adults from 1988-2012.
One of the most startling findings in this study was that in 2012, more than half of American adults had either diabetes or prediabetes. Also of interest was the fact that more than one-third of those who met the study's criteria for diabetes were unaware they had the disease.
Breakdown of Study Methods
The study used data collected as part of the 1988-94 and the 1999-2000 to 2011-12 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), which are designed to be nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population. Specifically, researchers used data from 2,781 adults from 2011-12 to estimate recent prevalence and an additional 23,634 adults from all NHANES conducted between 1988 and 2010 to estimate trends.
Furthermore, the researchers used two definitions of undiagnosed and total diabetes to bolster the reliability of their results. The first of these defined undiagnosed diabetes as any participant who had
a hemoglobin A1c level of 6.5 percent or greater,
a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 126 mg/dL or greater, or
a two-hour plasma glucose (2-hour PG) level of 200 mg/dL or greater (i.e., the hemoglobin A1c, FPG or 2-hour PG definition).
Total diabetes was defined as any part Continue reading

Say goodbye to type 2 diabetes in 8 weeks

Say goodbye to type 2 diabetes in 8 weeks

If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may be operating under a false belief about your situation…
You may believe that once you’ve crossed the line into type 2 diabetes territory, there’s no going back. You’re stuck with this disease for the rest of your life. But that’s far from the truth.
Sure, it’s not easy to get your metabolic health back in order once it’s gotten that far out of whack. But it is possible. People have done it through diet and exercise.
Or maybe you’ve known for a while that it’s possible to reverse type 2 diabetes through diet and exercise, but you still struggle to nail down (and stick to) an exact plan that will help you do so.
If that’s the case, this latest study from researchers at Newcastle University could help…
A proven diabetes-reversing diet
In a recent study, researchers from Newcastle University found that following a low-calorie diet for eight weeks reverses type 2 diabetes.
In fact, within just one week of starting the low-calorie diet, participants in the study experienced a dramatic improvement in insulin sensitivity, and their fasting blood sugar levels returned to normal.
But be warned… the low-calorie diet used in the study was extreme. Study participants only ate 600 calories per day for eight weeks. The recommended calorie intake for the average adult is between 1,500 and 2,500 calories per day (depending on sex, age and weight loss goals), so that’s quite a difference.
Of course, if you’re considering trying it anyway, you may be wondering why drastically reducing your calorie intake has Continue reading

10 Natural Substances That Could Help Cure Type 1 Diabetes

10 Natural Substances That Could Help Cure Type 1 Diabetes

Could the long-sought after cure for type 1 diabetes be as close as your kitchen cupboard? An accumulating body of scientific research appears to point in exactly that direction.
One so-called 'incurable disease' that afflicts millions of people around the world is type 1 diabetes. Unlike type 2 diabetes, where the body becomes resistant to its own insulin, type 1 is characterized by the inability of the body to produce enough insulin, as the beta cells within the pancreas which are responsible for the production of insulin (and the proinsulin from which it is made) are either destroyed or seriously impaired. This can happen due to autoimmune issues, bacterial or viral infections, incompatible foods in the diet and chemical exposures (or a combination of any one or more of these factors), to name but a few major triggers.
And yet, plenty of peer-reviewed and published research now indicates that plant compounds, including many found within commonly consumed foods, are capable of stimulating beta cell regeneration within the pancreas, and as a result may be potentially provide a cure – truly a four letter word, as far as the profit-based model of medicine goes, which thrives on the concept of the incurability of the disease-afflicted human body in favor of symptom management.
The discovery of the beta cell regenerative potential of various food and compounds is bound to upset a burgeoning diabetes industry, with millions of dollars of public and private money continually being poured into fund-raising efforts for a future "cure"; A cure that will presumably be delivered th Continue reading

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