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Invokana Linked To Increased Risk Of Leg, Foot & Toe Amputations

Invokana Linked To Increased Risk Of Leg, Foot & Toe Amputations

Invokana Linked To Increased Risk Of Leg, Foot & Toe Amputations

Current Invokana patients should watch for pain and tenderness in the feet, legs or toes, while physicians are instructed to screen prospective patients for factors that increase the risk of amputation.
Invokana Amputation Lawsuits
Hundreds of type 2 diabetes patients have already filed Invokana lawsuits against Janssen Pharmaceutical, the drug’s manufacturer and a subsidiary of global giant Johnson & Johnson. Today, more than 850 lawsuits are consolidated in the US District Court of New Jersey, claiming Invokana causes multiple severe complications, including diabetic ketoacidosis and kidney failure. With new medical evidence confirming a link between Invokana and amputations, legal observers believe that hundreds of other type 2 diabetes patients may also be able to file suit.
Increased Risk For Foot & Leg Amputations
New statistical analyses confirm that patients taking Invokana, Invokamet or Invokamet XR are around twice as likely to require leg and foot amputations than patients taking a placebo.
Alarmed by these recent findings, experts at the US Food & Drug Administration have now formally warned patients of Invokana’s newly-identified risk. On May 16, 2017, the FDA issued an urgent safety announcement, citing new data from two major clinical trials that investigated the drug’s potential dangers for eight years.
CANVAS & CANVAS-R
The risk for limb amputations, however, only became conclusive once these trials, known in medical circles as CANVAS and CANVAS-R, were completed in July 2017.
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Diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis - conditions put YOU at greater risk of THIS disease

Diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis - conditions put YOU at greater risk of THIS disease

Cardiovascular disease describes a set of conditions which affect the heart or blood vessels - which includes life-threatening problems such as heart attacks and stroke.
Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term condition that causes pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints and mainly affects the hands feet and wrists.
The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) - has set out to help people with rheumatoid arthritis to understand why they are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease - and the impact the condition can have on the heart.
Dr Holly John, consultant rheumatologist, said: “The increased risk of CVD for RA sufferers has the same level of severity as those who suffer with type 2 diabetes.
“It’s astonishing how many people with RA don't know that their condition could be detrimental to their heart.”
The NRAS has launched a programme Love Your Heart, developed in partnership with Dr Holly John.
The organisation is making the programme widely available to everyone with this serious autoimmune condition so that they have the opportunity to lower their CVD risk.
Dr John said: “Once aware, it’s very easy to manage risk factors from home with a healthier lifestyle, so Love Your Heart will be able to significantly raise awareness of this and help to address this major co-morbidity which can shorten the lives of those with RA.”
It’s astonishing how many people with rheumatoid arthritis don't know that their condition could be detrimental to their heart
While experts said it is not clear exactly why people with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk, Continue reading

Foot Complications and Diabetes

Foot Complications and Diabetes

Have you checked out your feet today? Your feet go through a lot on a daily basis. As a person with diabetes, you need to pay extra attention to them! Even the smallest of problems could get worse and lead to more serious complications in the future.
Neuropathy
Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is the most common foot problem for those with diabetes. Neuropathy can cause tingling, pain (burning or stinging), or weakness in the foot. It can cause loss of feeling in the feet, which can lessen your ability to feel pain, heat, cold, or injury. You could be walking around with a serious injury or an infected blister and not be aware! Nerve damage also can cause poor blood flow or changes in the shape of your feet or toes.
Skin Changes
Take a look at the skin of your foot. Diabetes can cause the skin of your foot to become very dry, which causes peeling and cracking. This happens because the nerves that control the oil and moisture in your foot no longer work.
Stock up on supplies! After bathing, dry your feet and rub any oil or cream products that work to relieve dryness. Keep the oils and creams away from in between your toes to avoid infection. Avoid soaking your feet is another problem that can dry your skin.
Calluses
Think of all of the jumping, walking, and moving that your feet go through on a daily basis! All of the movement that you are going through can cause calluses to form on the high-pressure areas of your feet. Calluses occur more often and build up faster on the feet of those with diabetes. Calluses can get very thick, break down, and turn into open sores if not trimme Continue reading

Diabetes Type 2 - Stem cells treatment clinic

Diabetes Type 2 - Stem cells treatment clinic

Diabetes Type 2 Stem Cell Treatment
Diabetes type 2 is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar and lack of insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates. It is typically a chronic disease with a ten-year shortened life expectancy and symptoms such as: increased thirst, frequent urination, and constant hunger.
There are a number of associated complications including: two to four times the risk of a cardiovascular disease and stroke, a 20-fold increase in lower limb amputations, and increased hospitalizations. Type 2 diabetes is the largest cause of non-traumatic blindness and kidney failure. It is associated with an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease. Other complications include: sexual dysfunction and frequent infections.
Causes of type 2 diabetes:
- obesity
- poor diet
- low activity level
- genetics and family history
Other diabetes risk factors include old age, high blood pressure, history of gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, impaired glucose intolerance and ethnicity, as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans are prone to an increased incidence of diabetes because of a history of gestational diabetes.
With Type 2 Diabetes the body becomes insensitive and less able to produce insulin, which transports glucose from the bloodstream into body tissues. Instead the sugar volume in the blood builds up. The pancreas may increase insulin production but it does not rectify the problem.
Other symptoms of this disease include blurr Continue reading

The Alarming Diabetes-Alzheimer’s Connection

The Alarming Diabetes-Alzheimer’s Connection

The possible complications posed by diabetes—heart disease and damage to eyes, feet, nerves and so forth—are fairly familiar to the general public. But in recent years, scientists have been scrutinizing a risk that is both less well known and less understood—the heightened likelihood of dementia.
Researchers have known for several years about diabetes and the higher risk of vascular dementia, the second most common kind. In ways, it seems only logical: Vascular dementia is caused by damaged blood vessels in the brain, just as diabetes hardens blood vessels elsewhere.
The latest research is focused on Alzheimer’s disease, the most common neurodegenerative disorder and one for which it’s harder to figure out the precise relationship with diabetes. On this much, many scientists agree: The rate of Alzheimer’s disease could be cut by close to half if diabetes could be abolished. The connection between the two is so strong that Suzanne M. de la Monte, one of the top researchers in the field, has said that many cases of Alzheimer’s could be dubbed Type 3 diabetes.
People who haven’t necessarily developed diabetes might still develop insulin resistance in the brain, said de la Monte, a professor of neurosurgery, pathology and laboratory medicine at Brown University. That’s why she uses the term Type 3 diabetes—one doesn’t necessarily cause the other. But in both cases, she said, people show certain markers at the cellular level.
“Growing evidence supports the concept that Alzheimer’s disease is fundamentally a metabolic disease with molecular and biochemic Continue reading

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