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International Textbook Of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #82: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 9 Of 9

International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #82: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 9 of 9

International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #82: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 9 of 9


Home / Resources / Clinical Gems / International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #82: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 9 of 9
International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #82: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 9 of 9
At any point in time, the glycemic response to exogenous glucose is the balance between the rate at which glucose appears in the systemic circulation (from oral as well as endogenous sources) and the rate at which glucose is disposed of. Oral glucose appearance in the peripheral circulation depends on: (a) the rate at which the gastric contents are passed on to the small intestine; (b) the rate of intestinal glucose absorption; (c) the extent of gut glucose utilization; (d) the degree of hepatic glucose trapping; and (e) the dynamics of glucose transfer through gut, liver, and posthepatic circulation on to the right heart. The contribution of endogenous glucose to the glycemic response to feeding depends on the extent and rate of change of hepatic glucose production. Finally, glucose disposal depends on changes in the pattern of hormonal stimuli and substrate availability.
Being a summation phenomenon, the response to oral glucose explores the whole of glucose tolerance, not the individual contribution of the various components. The rate-limiting step in the transfer of ingested glucose from the stomach to the liver is the rate of gastric emptying. This depends on the volume, temperature, and osmolarity of the glucose solution in the case in which glucose alone is ingested. Glucose absorption Continue reading

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Can I Still Donate Blood if I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood if I Have Diabetes?


20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read
Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood
To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood.
Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed.
You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes
Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood.
Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions.
Another thing to know is that Continue reading

HempWorx CBD Oil Testimonies From Customers with Diabetes

HempWorx CBD Oil Testimonies From Customers with Diabetes


HempWorx CBD Oil Testimonies From Customers with Diabetes
HempWorx CBD oil is legal in 50 states, contains virtually no THC and is the purest on the market!
Almost HALF of the U.S population either has diabetes or have experienced pre-diabetes signs. This disease poses its own day-to-day health problems that are hard to deal with. However it likewise puts you at much-greater risk for heart disease, kidney failure, nerve damage, and numerous other disorders.
Studies have found that CBD treatment considerably lowers the danger of diabetes in mice. The occurrence dropped from 86% in non-treated mice to 30% in CBD-treated mice.
Meaning, CBD has beneficial impacts on your blood sugar and can reduce your threat of diabetes.
Many people have given their testimonies of how CBD oil from HEMPWORX has helped them personally.
Order HempWorx by phone 1-800-253-4201 (toll free)
Testimonies from HempWorx CBD Oil Customers with Diabetes
I have type 2 diabetes and started CBD oil almost two weeks ago. My blood sugars have been good, with no medication.
I am taking 500mg, 10 drops twice a day. I know, just like medication, everybody is different. I just cant believe how low my sugar levels have been, without my prescribed meds and just taking HempWorx!
Type 1 diabetes, neuropathy, glaucoma, kidney disease and HempWorx CBD Oil
Type 1 diabetes: started A1C 9.7 as of today 5.4, he is also taking less insulin Daily and at night!
Glaucoma: He lowered his eye pressure from 36 and 37 to 16 and 18 as of today! He was taking medications and Trabeculoplasty (targeted laser treatments) he Continue reading

Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes

Resist diabetes: A randomized clinical trial for resistance training maintenance in adults with prediabetes

Abstract
Research design and methods
Sedentary, overweight/obese (BMI: 25–39.9 kg/m2) adults aged 50–69 (N = 170) with prediabetes participated in the 15-month trial. Participants completed a supervised 3-month RT (2×/wk) phase and were randomly assigned (N = 159) to one of two 6-month maintenance conditions: SCT or standard care. Participants continued RT at a self-selected facility. The final 6-month period involved no contact. Assessments occurred at baseline and months 3, 9, and 15. The SCT faded-contact intervention consisted of nine tailored transition (i.e., supervised training to training alone) and nine follow-up sessions. Standard care involved six generic follow-up sessions. Primary outcomes were prevalence of normoglycemia and muscular strength.
The retention rate was 76%. Four serious adverse events were reported. After 3 months of RT, 34% of participants were no longer prediabetic. This prevalence of normoglycemia was maintained through month 15 (30%), with no group difference. There was an 18% increase in the odds of being normoglycemic for each % increase in fat-free mass. Increases in muscular strength were evident at month 3 and maintained through month 15 (P<0.001), which represented improvements of 21% and 14% for chest and leg press, respectively. Results did not demonstrate a greater reduction in prediabetes prevalence in the SCT condition.
Resistance training is an effective, maintainable strategy for reducing prediabetes prevalence and increasing muscular strength. Future research which promotes RT initiation and maintenance in clinical and comm Continue reading

Diabetes Type 2 CEU | Wild Iris Medical Education

Diabetes Type 2 CEU | Wild Iris Medical Education


LEARNING OUTCOME AND OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this continuing education course, you will demonstrate increased knowledge of evidence-based guidelines for caring for patients with type 2 diabetes. Specific learning objectives include:
Review the underlying causes of types 1 and 2 diabetes.
Describe the incidence, prevalence, costs, and groups at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Discuss prevention strategies for patients at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Describe the assessment and screening criteria used to diagnose and monitor patients.
Review current recommendations for treating patients with type 2 diabetes.
Describe the components of a long-term plan of care for patients with type 2 diabetes.
Explain the necessary lifestyle modifications for patients.
Discuss the most serious patient complications associated with type 2 diabetes and their effective treatment interventions.
Diabetes mellitusor, simply, diabetesis a chronic illness in which the body is exposed to continual high levels of blood glucose, a condition known as hyperglycemia. In the short term, extreme hyperglycemia can lead to life-threatening dehydration and coma. Over the long term, hyperglycemia damages capillaries and larger blood vessels by thickening their walls and narrowing their inner diameters. This reduces the blood flow to many areas of the body and causes permanent tissue damage, notably to the retinas and the kidneys. Long-term high blood glucose levels also damage nerve endings.
An estimated 29.1 million people, or 9.3% of the U.S. population, has diabetes.
As many as Continue reading

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