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Insulin Vaccine May Prevent Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Insulin Vaccine May Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Children

Insulin Vaccine May Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Children

A vaccination for type 1 diabetes may soon be a reality for children, according to a new study from the German Research Centre for Environmental Health.
The Pre-POINT study is a continuation of a previous study that found powdered insulin could trigger a positive immune response in children who have a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes. Now, researchers will test whether this effect can be achieved with oral insulin.
"The [study] will treat children between the ages of six months and two years who carry a genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes or have a family history of the disease, but who have not yet developed an autoimmune response," a press release on the study stated.
Children in the study will take the insulin every day with their food for 12 months.
Oral insulin acts like a vaccine
Oral insulin has no effect on blood sugar levels because it is absorbed through the digestive tract, researchers explained. Therefore, it acts like a vaccine that triggers the immune system.
"The autoimmune response that causes type 1 diabetes in childhood is often initially directed at the insulin," said Professor Anette-Gabriele Ziegler, Director of the Institute of Diabetes Research.
By building up immune tolerance to the insulin, the hope is that the children's bodies can block the autoimmune process that causes type 1 diabetes by stimulating the growth of protective immune cells.
"Medical examinations will be conducted at three-month intervals in order to monitor the general health of the participants," the report stated.
Image courtesy of Baitong333/FreeDigitalPhotos.ne Continue reading

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Cancer and diabetes: Often more than a chance encounter

Cancer and diabetes: Often more than a chance encounter

Like familiar faces in a crowd, cancer and diabetes seem to bump into each other often. At first blush, the two diseases appear to be strangers, but scientists have found they have multiple connections and often are found together in the same patients. The results of a new study, conducted at the University of Toronto and published this summer in the American Cancer Society's Cancer magazine, conclude that patients with diabetes have an increased chance of being diagnosed with cancer just months later.
Although most research supports a link between cancer and diabetes, finding the root of that connection has proven elusive. The Toronto study offers no direct physiological connection between the two diseases, but it suggests the dual diagnosis may be explained by "increased health care visits and screening tests following a diagnosis of diabetes," says co-author Dr. Iliana Lega, in an interview with medicalxpress.com.
Cancer and diabetes are two of the most damaging and prevalent diseases in the United States, and the world. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 30 million Americans—more than 9 percent of the population—have diabetes. The CDC also estimates that 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), nearly 14 million Americans have a history of cancer and 1.6 million new cases will be diagnosed each year.
The numbers alone suggest it's inevitable that some patients will develop both diseases. But research shows the connection is more than just happenstance. In 2010, the American Diabete Continue reading

Statins linked to 46-percent increased diabetes risk for men

Statins linked to 46-percent increased diabetes risk for men

The use of statins can increase diabetes risk by 46 percent in men, according to new research published in Diabetologia.
Even after accounting for various factors like age, body mass index, waist circumference or physical activity, the study revealed that patients treated with statins were more likely to develop diabetes, especially if they were taking higher doses of these medications.
The statins mentioned in the study were simvastatin (Zocor) and atorvastatin (Lipitor).
Insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion decreased
The study included 8,749 non-diabetic men between the ages of 45 and 73 who were tracked for a period of 5.9 years.
Overall, statin treatment was associated with a 24 percent decrease in insulin sensitivity and a 12 percent decrease in insulin secretion.
"Statin therapy was associated with a 46% increased risk of type 2 diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors, suggesting a higher risk of diabetes in the general population than previously reported," the researchers wrote.
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up.
Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatment.
In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't produce any insulin, or the insulin that is produced is not properly utilized. This is due to a condition known as insulin resistance, which prevents key par Continue reading

Meal Planning Quick Start Guide

Meal Planning Quick Start Guide

Figuring out what a healthy meal looks like can be confusing to LOTS of people, but the truth is that it’s just not that complicated. This handy “Quick Start Guide” will make it a lot simpler… choose two vegetables from the list of veggies on the left, some protein and a serving of whole grains or starchy vegetables and you’re all set!
Print out this page and tape it to your refrigerator or a cabinet so that you can refer to it whenever you need to. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll be able to plan a delicious and nutritious meal with your eyes closed! You can download it by clicking here!
And if you’d like to see some actual examples of healthy meals using this approach, click here. Continue reading

Five Diabetes-Friendly Recipes for Peanut Butter Lovers

Five Diabetes-Friendly Recipes for Peanut Butter Lovers

Peanut butter not only tastes great but also can help to control blood sugar levels and appetite, according to research.
Enjoy this delicious and nutritious spread with these five diabetes-friendly recipes:
3.1 grams of carbohydrate per cookie
4.4 grams of carbohydrate per serving
10 grams of carbohydrate per slice
12.6 grams of carbohydrate
13.5 grams of carbohydrate
Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up.
Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatment.
In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't produce any insulin, or the insulin that is produced is not properly utilized. This is due to a condition known as insulin resistance, which prevents key parts of the body (such as muscle, fat and the liver) from responding to insulin as they should.
Insulin resistance means that sugar never makes it into the cells where it can be used for the body's energy needs. Instead, massive levels of it build within the bloodstream.
Type 2 diabetes has a gradual onset
Type 2 diabetes also differs from its younger counterpart in that onset can be very slow, lasting for years. The gradual progression is typically not noticed by the individual until the condition becomes full-blown. Being overweight helps the disease to develop faster.
Genetics can also play a part in the likelihood of diagnosis. If a pa Continue reading

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